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Download Cowboys and Indians: The Shooting of J.J. Harper eBook

by Gordon Sinclair Jr.

Download Cowboys and Indians: The Shooting of J.J. Harper eBook
ISBN:
0771080824
Author:
Gordon Sinclair Jr.
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
McClelland & Stewart; First Edition edition (November 20, 1999)
Pages:
416 pages
EPUB book:
1791 kb
FB2 book:
1960 kb
DJVU:
1537 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
349


Cowboys and Indians book. Pursued doggedly by Winnipeg Free Press columnist Gordon Sinclair J. the n story of the shooting of .

Cowboys and Indians book. Harper points a finger at the growing disaster of race relations and policing in Canada’s inner cities.

Cowboys and Indians", various children's games, similar to Cops and robbers. Cowboys & Indians: The Killing of . Harper, a 1999 book by Gordon Sinclair Jr. about the killing of John Joseph Harper. Cowboys and East Indians, a 2015 novel. All Indian Rodeo Cowboys Association, a Native American organization which promotes Indian rodeo. American Indian Wars. Cowboy (disambiguation). Indian (disambiguation).

Title: Cowboys and Indians: The . Harper Story (TV Movie 2003). grabbing for his gun, which resulted in the shooting for Cross to protect himself. In private, Cross is slowly unraveling mentally about his.

Harper of the Island Lake Tribal Council was fatally shot on a wintry Winnipeg street in 1988, the city police department was quick to absolve the officer involved from all blame. Less than a day after the shooting, Police Chief Herb Stephen announced that Harper had died during a struggle for Constable Robert Cross's gun. But the truth was not so cut and dried.

Harper's shooting was described in a 1999 book, "Cowboys & Indians: The Killing of . Harper", written by Winnipeg Free Press columnist Gordon Sinclair J. and later a 2003 television movie by the same name. and later a 2003 television movie by the same name References. Sawatzky, Wendy (2003-03-07). Harper: 15 Years Later". Retrieved 2008-08-13.

Pic is based on tome by journo Gordon Sinclair J. who helped expose the departmental cover-up that ensued . Screenplay, Andrew Rai Berzins, based on the book "Cowboys and Indians: The Killing of . who helped expose the departmental cover-up that ensued after unarmed Manitoba tribal leader . Harper was shot to death. Running time: 91 MIN.

Cowboys & Indians (magazine), an American magazine for adults that focuses on the Western lifestyle. This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Cowboys and Indians. This Canadian biographical article is a stub.

When J.J. Harper of the Island Lake Tribal Council was fatally shot on a wintry Winnipeg street in 1988, the city police department was quick to absolve the officer involved from all blame. Less than a day after the shooting, Police Chief Herb Stephen announced that Harper had died during a struggle for Constable Robert Cross’s gun.But the truth was not so cut and dried. Far from closing the case, Stephen’s remarks were just the start of this dramatic tale of sex, death, threats, flimsy charges, and a police force so out of control that a prominent lawyer, a senior Crown attorney, and a respected journalist all had reason to suspect they were being watched by the police.Pursued doggedly by Winnipeg Free Press columnist Gordon Sinclair Jr., the stranger-than-fiction story of the shooting of J.J. Harper points a finger at the growing disaster of race relations and policing in Canada’s inner cities.
  • Biaemi
The story behind J.J. Harper's death seems to be obscure; there's very little out on the internet about it at the time of this review. It's a complicated story that gets bogged down by what appears to be an earnest attempt to tell the whole story and give it broader context.

Sinclair embeds himself into the story; based on the book, he became part of the greater story. The 'new journalism' style of subjective dramatization becomes byzantine, and what works well in a column doesn't translate well to a 400+ page book. It's already hard to track with a seemingly endless cast of characters that are unrelated yet share surnames. It isn't helped by bad editing/typesetting (as if someone went crazy with spellcheck and no one proofread it afterwards -- ironic considering that in one case there's a blatantly wrong name used, when one of the plot points is a misunderstood name).

Sinclair attempts to be objective even though his bias is often obvious; his struggle to show the humanity of most of the people involved is evident. This wasn't a case widely or continuously reported on in the US, so it's frustrating not to have references to follow up on beyond "Aboriginal Justice Inquiry". There's a dearth of information about how "Natives" (aboriginals/first peoples) in Canada are treated here in the US -- a subject that seems to be even more complex and tragic than it is in the US. As someone wanting to learn more, I found it frustrating to not be able to use the book to enhance my understanding.

All that said, Sinclair clearly makes an effort to illustrate how there were many victims in this tragedy, and how institutionalized racism is both tenacious and devastating to all.
  • Dusar
Good book with upsetting reality.
  • Malaris
I was given this book to read as part of my journalism program in the city where Gordon Sinclair Jr writes his column. I wasn't too familiar with his writing prior to beginning this book, and I hope not to become anymore familiar with it afterward.

Basically, the story in the book is one that needed to be told. A Native man, guilty of no crime, named J.J. Harper, was killed in a struggle with a police officer in the late 1980's. The police officer, Robert Cross, was almost immediately absolved of any responsibility in the incident, until a number of inquiries into the death of J.J. Harper were called. The book is a detailed account of the inquiries and the people affected by them - with firsthand interviews and transcriptions of the events that transpired over a number of years.

While I was moved by the story, and intrigued by the evidence and stories of the people in the story, Sinclair's writing is rotten. There are a vast number of editorial mistakes, and Sinclair is near-slanderous in some of his writings and editorializing. The worst part of it all is his insertion into the story. I've read many works by authors (journalists to be specific) which use themselves in the story - but only to further the understanding of the person or topic that is being discussed. Sinclair goes too deep into his own personal life, relaying tales of his infidelity and nights at bars and strip clubs. Aside from that, Sinclair goes on to build up his importance in the book, as if he alone was responsible for breakthroughs in the story, and his opinion caused law and police officials to suddenly change their minds on certain topics.

All in all, if you are interested in true crime stories - that are quite detailed and complex (I'd reccommend keeping a list of names of people and who they are beside you as you read this book as Sinclair doesn't do many favours for those who forget a name or two) - then try reading this book. Its not bad, but I feel as though Harper's story could've been better told, or at least, better written.
  • doesnt Do You
Once, many lives ago, I worked near Logan and Main in inner-city Winnipeg, Canada.
At the time, it was the epicenter of poverty and hopelessness, a toxic mix and this neighborhood, referred to as Urban Renewal Area II when I was there, is as bleak as any ghetto in any country. Native Canadians, the racial group who populate the area, are much like any group who are denied their place in the sun - displaced, despondent, frustrated, and angry at the power structure that oppresses them and sooner or later things reach a point where their issues must be addressed.
Sometimes it takes a riot, sometimes an assassination.
Unfortunately, it took too long after a troubled white policeman's murder of J. J. Harper, a First Nations leader, for the investigations by judicial commissions to break through the "blue wall" and place blame where it needed to go -- on bigoted cops. The police power structure was forced to examine itself and start to change. (Perhaps they all had a cold and couldn't smell the stink of institutional racism.)
Sinclair, on the side of the angels and the aboriginals, crafts a fast paced narrative, which he previously reported on as a columnist for the local paper. His style is smooth, economical, and concise and he covers the upheavals that began at Harper's death deftly and with compassion. (Almost every one here is a casualty including the victim, the cop that killed him and their families.)
The book moves with authority and slices and dices through the ultimately futile smokescreens thrown up by the police with a well-practiced hand. The recounting of this tragic story is good for Sinclair's readers and ultimately good for all of the people in the City of Winnipeg.
I was in Winnipeg last week and the centre of the city is poorer and more natives have moved in. The white flight continues. The First Nations people are still marginalized.
Maybe there's more hope because of this book.