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Download Surviving the City: The Chinese Immigrant Experience in New York City, 1890D1970 (Pacific Formations: Global Relations in Asian and Pacific Perspectives) eBook

by Xinyang Wang

Download Surviving the City: The Chinese Immigrant Experience in New York City, 1890D1970 (Pacific Formations: Global Relations in Asian and Pacific Perspectives) eBook
ISBN:
0742508900
Author:
Xinyang Wang
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (July 11, 2001)
Pages:
176 pages
EPUB book:
1257 kb
FB2 book:
1161 kb
DJVU:
1794 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
105


Surviving the City is a tightly focused case study that could work well as a reading in upper-level undergraduate and graduate level courses. Scholars with an interest in New York City or the history of immigration in the . society will also find this study well worth their attention.

Surviving the City is a tightly focused case study that could work well as a reading in upper-level undergraduate and graduate level courses. New York City History).

Surviving the City book. The author shows how, with the rise of an enclave economy in the 1950s, the New York Chinese began to make different survival choices

Surviving The City book. The author shows how, with the rise of an enclave economy in the 1950s, the New York Chinese began to make different survival choices. Now more took up residence in Chinatown, loosened the bonds of regional and kinship networks, and unionized.

Exploring the multifaceted Chinese experience in New York City, Xinyang Wang persuasively illustrates that economic forces more than racism influenced immigrantsO life decisions.

Surviving the City : The Chinese Immigrant Experience in New York City, 1890-1970. Exploring the multifaceted Chinese experience in New York City, Xinyang Wang persuasively illustrates that economic forces more than racism influenced immigrantsO life decisions.

The author, Xinyang Wang, is a social historian who reassesses the history of early Chinese immigrants in New York City, departing from the ethnic-heritage and racism analyses of immigrants' adaptation to America

The author, Xinyang Wang, is a social historian who reassesses the history of early Chinese immigrants in New York City, departing from the ethnic-heritage and racism analyses of immigrants' adaptation to America. Instead, he pursues an actor-oriented approach, showing how economic forces played an important part in the decision-making activities of the immigrants, such as the selection of neighbourhoods for settlement, participation in the labour movement, return to China, and intensification of intra-group solidarity. Export citation Request permission.

Surviving the City: Chinese Immigrant Experience in New York City, 1890-1970, and: Seeking . Echoing recent scholarship in Asian American Studies, Wang refuses to se. .

Surviving the City: Chinese Immigrant Experience in New York City, 1890-1970, and: Seeking Modernity. January 2002 · Journal of Asian American Studies. Xinyang Wang's Surviving the City is a well-organized and thoughtfully conceptualized historical study of a major Chinese American community outside California, namely, Chinese New York. Echoing recent scholarship in Asian American Studies, Wang refuses to see Chinese Americans simply as victims of racial discrimination. He adopts the ethnic economy approach that scholars have fruitfully used in studying other ethnic communities, including Japanese America.

Journal of Asian American Studies. Orrenius, Pia; Zavodny, Madeline; Kerr, Emily (25 June 2012). Chinese Immigrants in the . Labor Market: Effects of PostTiananmen Immigration Policy".

Surviving the City: The Chinese Immigrant Experience in New York City, 1890-1970. Pacific Formations Series, Global Relations in Asian and Pacific Perspectives. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2001. Urban poverty, housing, and social change in China. London; New York: Routledge, 2004. Wank, David L. Commodifying Communism, Business, Trust and Politics in a Chinese City. Structural Analysis in the Social Sciences Series, Vol. 14. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

Chinese settlers in Southeast Asian countries and South Asians in Africa became trading minorities with an important .

Chinese settlers in Southeast Asian countries and South Asians in Africa became trading minorities with an important intermediary role for colonialism. Most of these came from Hong Kong, Taiwan, Korea, and Japan.

This innovative work explores the multifaceted Chinese experience in New York City. Incisively questioning accepted wisdom and easy cultural assumptions, Xinyang Wang persuasively illustrates that economic forces more than racism influenced immigrantsO life decisions. Wang argues that rather than being passive victims, the Chinese were economic actors making rational choices for survival.

This innovative work explores the multifaceted Chinese experience in New York City. Incisively questioning accepted wisdom and easy cultural assumptions, Xinyang Wang persuasively illustrates that economic forces more than racism influenced immigrantsO life decisions. Wang argues that rather than being passive victims, the Chinese were economic actors making rational choices for survival. Wang answers such questions as why for the first half of the century New York Chinese continued to live in white neighborhoods despite severe discrimination there, why they retained their group loyalties even at the expense of fighting discrimination, and why they chose not to join the established labor movement. The author shows how, with the rise of an enclave economy in the 1950s, the New York Chinese began to make different survival choices. Now more took up residence in Chinatown, loosened the bonds of regional and kinship networks, and unionized. By avoiding strictly culturalist explanations and incorporating a comparative analysis of Italian immigrants in the city, Wang erases long-standing stereotypes about the Chinese American experience and brings it into the mainstream discourse on AmericaOs immigrant history.