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Download Property Rules: Political Economy in Chicago, 1833-1872 eBook

by Robin L. Einhorn

Download Property Rules: Political Economy in Chicago, 1833-1872 eBook
ISBN:
0226194868
Author:
Robin L. Einhorn
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press (December 1, 2001)
Pages:
295 pages
EPUB book:
1741 kb
FB2 book:
1338 kb
DJVU:
1296 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
479


In Property Rules, Robin L. Einhorn uses City Council records-previously thought destroyed-and census data to track the course of city government in Chicago.

In Property Rules, Robin L. Einhorn uses City Council records-previously thought destroyed-and census data to track the course of city government in Chicago, providing an important reinterpretation of the relationship between political and social structures in the nineteenth-century. Einhorn uses City Council records-previously thought destroyed-and census data to track the course of city government in Chicago, providing an important reinterpretation of the relationship between political and social structures in the nineteenth-century American city. A Choice "Outstanding Academic Book" " masterful study of policy-making in Chicago. major contribution to urban and political history.

Start by marking Property Rules: Political Economy in Chicago, 1833-1872 as Want to Read .

Start by marking Property Rules: Political Economy in Chicago, 1833-1872 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In Property Rules, Robin L.

In roperty Rules, Robin L. Choice " major contribution to urban and political history.

Property Rules: Political Economy in Chicago, 1833–1872. ByRobin L. Einhorn · Chicago, Il. University of Chicago Press, 1991. xvii + 295 pp. Figures, maps, notes, appendixes, bibliography, and index.

However, Robin L. Einhorn’s work Property Rules: Political Economy in Chicago, 1833 – 1872 examines the political and economic history of the metropolis’ experiment with a segmented government system. Unlike the machine politics of latter eras, the segmented system prevented corruption to such an extent that its government was clean enough to satisfy even the most fastidious of urban reformers.

Property Rules: Political Economy in Chicago, 1833-1872. Species of Property: The American Property Tax Uniformity Clauses Reconsidered," Journal of Economic History 61 (2001): 973-1007. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991. Reissued with new Preface, 2001. Slavery and the Politics of Taxation in the Early United States," Studies in American Political Development 14 (2000):197-225. The Civil War and Municipal Government in Chicago," in Toward a Social History of the American Civil War: Exploratory Essays, ed. Maris A. Vinovskis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990, 117-38.

In "Property Rules," Robin L. A Choice "Outstanding Academic Book"" A] masterful study of policy-making in Chicago.

Chudacoff, Howard . 1993. Property Rules: Political Economy in Chicago, 1833–1872. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

In Property Rules, Robin L. Einhorn uses City Council records-previously thought destroyed-and census data to track the course of city government in Chicago, providing an important reinterpretation of the relationship between political and social structures in the nineteenth-century American city.A Choice "Outstanding Academic Book""[A] masterful study of policy-making in Chicago."—Choice"[A] major contribution to urban and political history. . . . [A]n excellent book."—Jeffrey S. Adler, American Historical Review"[A]n enlightening trip. . . . Einhorn's foray helps make sense out of the transition from Jacksonian to Gilded Age politics on the local level. . . . [She] has staked out new ground that others would do well to explore."—Arnold R. Hirsch, American Journal of Legal History"A well-documented and informative classic on urban politics."—Daniel W. Kwong, Law Books in Review