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Download The Uncertain Revolution: Washington and the Continental Army at Morristown eBook

by John T. Cunningham

Download The Uncertain Revolution: Washington and the Continental Army at Morristown eBook
ISBN:
1593220286
Author:
John T. Cunningham
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Down The Shore Publishing; First Edition edition (October 10, 2007)
Pages:
352 pages
EPUB book:
1779 kb
FB2 book:
1984 kb
DJVU:
1285 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
427


But this ''geological fortress'' - Washington and the Continental Army's winter quarters for four years - may . John Cunningham is a New Jersey living treasure. His lively writing makes The Uncertain Revolution easy to rea. .A dramatic tale that is well worth reading.

But this ''geological fortress'' - Washington and the Continental Army's winter quarters for four years - may well be the place where America survived. In The Uncertain Revolution. Legendary historian John T. Cunningham explores New Jersey's pivotal role in the Revolutionary Wa.Vivid and enjoyable history.

The Uncertain Revolution book. Now I want to go investigate Washington’s Headquarters in the Ford Mansion in Morristown, and the Jockey Hollow National Historic Park, where Washington and his army spent more winters, and more severe winters, than in Valley Forge. Most fascinating was a fire beacon system of twenty-three sites along the Watchung Mountains, to alert the militias on the Jersey coastal plains of a British attack. Remember the fire beacon scene in the Lord of the Rings movie? We actually lived that in the Revolutionary War!

Washington and the Continental Army at Morristown.

Washington and the Continental Army at Morristown. By John T. Cunningham. In The Uncertain Revolution, John T. Cunningham tells the story of those forgotten winters in Middlebrook and Morristown and of their critical importance to the course of the war. Geographically, the mountains made an excellent defensive position, hiding from the British the disarray of the American army and the horrific conditions.

New Jersey historian John T. Cunningham explores the overlooked Revolutionary War winters of General George Washington?s army encampments at Morristown and Middlebrook

New Jersey historian John T. Cunningham explores the overlooked Revolutionary War winters of General George Washington?s army encampments at Morristown and Middlebrook. He makes the case that the Continental Army ? and the American Revolution ? may have survived from 1777 until 1781 because of the ?geological fortress? of New Jersey?s Watchung Mountains and because of the residents of the region?s small towns and farms.

The Uncertain Revolution. Washington and the Continental Army at Morristown. Published October 10, 2007 by Down The Shore Pub.

Product - The Uncertain Revolution: Washington and the Continental Army at Morristown. Nearly all addresses in the continental . except those marked as ineligible below. Select items that are not included in ShippingPass will ship for free but with value shipping. Look for items sold by Walmart. com and marked with FREE shipping. You will also see this noted in checkout. Addresses in the following State Codes AK, HI, AE, AP, AA, PR, GU, MP, PW, AS, VI, FM and APO/FPO addresses with . ZIP Codes will ship for free with value shipping. You will see this noted in checkout. Ineligible items & addresses.

Hyatt Regency Morristown.

At the premier, remarks were provided by a number of the people that were part of the making of the video including John T Cunningham (now deceased) who wrote the book that was the inspiration for its creation: "The Uncertain Revolution: Washington and the Continental Army at Morristown. com/watch?v lx5YkyHuPvQ. Hyatt Regency Morristown.

George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) commanded the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783). After serving as President of the United States (1789 to 1797), he briefly was in charge of a new army in 1798

George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) commanded the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783). After serving as President of the United States (1789 to 1797), he briefly was in charge of a new army in 1798. Washington, despite his youth, played a major role in the frontier wars against the French and Indians in the 1750s and 1760s. He played the leading military role in the American Revolution

by Gratian11 Mar 26 via Android.

George Washington and the Continental Army are defeated by General Howe's force marching north. It was here at Morristown that the Continental Army was nearly starved out of existence

George Washington and the Continental Army are defeated by General Howe's force marching north. Howe was able to successfully flank the American forces holding positions across the Brandywine Creek near Chadds Ford. Battle of Brandywine. The Brandywine Campaign of 1777: An Interview with Michael Harris. It was here at Morristown that the Continental Army was nearly starved out of existence. The constant lack of food and the never-ending hard winter led to the mutiny of several Continental regiments. Washington declared that the army could "perish for want of food. Morristown, New Jersey.

Without New Jersey's Watchung Mountains and the towns around Morristown, would the American Revolution have succeeded? Would George Washington's army have survived? New Jersey's esteemed historian John T. Cunningham explores the harsh circumstances and geography of this region during the War of Independence. It is an account of American history that has been overlooked and overshadowed until now. But this ''geological fortress'' -- Washington and the Continental Army's winter quarters for four years -- may well be the place where America survived. In The Uncertain Revolution, John T. Cunningham tells the story of those forgotten winters in Middlebrook and Morristown and of their critical importance to the course of the war. Geographically, the mountains made an excellent defensive position, hiding from the British the disarray of the American army and the horrific conditions. Reports of the strength and numbers of American troops fluctuated wildly as Washington and his officers tried to stave off desertion and mutiny. Washington's army survived a small pox epidemic at Morristown, a season of short supplies at Middlebrook, the most brutal winter of the war in 1779-80, and the war's most dire mutiny on New Year's Day 1781. There's drama -- including the cat-and-mouse game played with the unpredictable British general, George Clinton, and treachery -- with one of his favorite officers, Benedict Arnold. There's also the fierce performance of the New Jersey militia in defense of their homes and farms. In The Uncertain Revolution John T. Cunningham makes the case for the importance of Morristown and the mountains to an understanding of the war itself. And just as the history of those harsh winters has long been neglected, so were the physical places over time. The soldiers huts in the mountains at Jockey Hollow disintegrated, and the houses that had served as Washington's headquarters were almost lost to neglect and development. The author's account of their reclamation and eventual incorporation into the America's first National Historical Park in 1933 is a fitting conclusion to his story of Washington in the Watchungs.
  • Zorve
I have just finished reading this book last night and boy, I am left believing that this is one of the best books I have ever read. First I want to address issues raised by the writers of the bad reviews, first that it is in textbook format. I don't know whether he is referring to the size and shape of the book, or whether it is a reference to the passages of information that are included throughout the book that add detail and history to the already rich history text. I have been to school before and I am a college graduate, let me tell you if this book was a textbook format then I would never have been able to get through the first chapter. This book is a rich historical narrative following the accounts of Washington's Army as they encamp numerous times in and around Morristown, New Jersey.

Second, the other bad review that called the book a colossal disappointment, I believe this guy has his own ideas about why the soldiers suffered and since the author didn't cover what he wanted him to he just blatantly decided to automatically hate the book. I don't say that he is not entitled to his opinion of course, but I disagree that whole wonderful history presented in this book is ruined just because a few things didn't get covered that he thinks should have.

Overall, I say if you are on the fence line wondering whether or not to buy the book I say don't let the bad reviews sway you. The reviews are of a more biased and personal dislike rather than a real through critique of the history reviewed here. The story of Morristown is wonderfully presented by the author, beginning with the winter encampment of 1777 that immediately followed the Battles of Trenton and Princeton. The author follows the adventures of the Continental Army under Washington through the remaining years of the war and the many times that they encamped there, four times to be exact. While this doesn't cover just the worst winter of the war during 1779-1780, it adds a rich and wonderful following of the war and is a excellent walk through of the war to anyone who loves history or is a big fan of the Revolution.

The most fun part of the book for me was the part dealing with the mutiny that occurred in January of 1781, I was on the edge of my seat as I read about it, and I was mad too because they never covered those mutinies in school when I was there. To that end this is a story of a forgotten and neglected part of our history. The author makes the most wonderful and heartfelt case at the end to why the history has been forgotten and overlooked compared to Valley Forge. Nothing diminishes what happened at Valley Forge, but as the author suggest, since records can't say that as many people died in Morristown it is judged that the men did not suffer as much there. Reading this you will come to see the truth, men don't have to die in huge numbers to suffer. Those who suffered at Morristown during the many winters there deserve our remembrance and gratitude.

This is now one of my favorite books, I am a avid reader of history and I can't count all the history books I have read. So take it from a actual and real history buff, this book is worth every penny and dime you spend to learn about a overlooked and unappreciated history of our Founding Fathers, don't let the bad reviews sway you. They are entitled to their opinion but what they have chosen to criticize about this book doesn't make it a bad book, it was just not what they wanted. I am so eager now to read my next book on the American Revolution, and that in of itself is where this book succeeded for me, leaving me wanting to learn more about the American Revolution.
  • SARAND
This book covered more than the two winters at Morristown and the one at nearby Middlebrook. It provided good insight into the times and the bitterness of winter during the little ice age. It was a bit lean on parallel events, such as the forage war, but overall was informative and a good read.
  • GoodBuyMyFriends
I just really love this book and the subject. This book is very informative about an area I grew up in and did not know how much history was there.
  • Ieregr
I live in Morristown and it's local history, but also well written and researched by a local historian, now deceased.
  • Shakataxe
John T Cunningham has made me aware of the hard times that troops had in the winter of 1779-80 who knew it was a harder winter than the one spent in Valley Forge! a well written yarn with lots of illustrations and a great story of survival under awful conditions
  • Gholbirius
Best history book for New Jersey citizens, as well as all Americans. Clearly and vividly written. Each chapter a complete story. Very well researched. I have given and lent to several others.
  • Delagamand
An excellent description and analysis of Washington's army during the winter, 1779-80, one of the most severe in recent history.The analysis points out the strategic importance of the Watchung mts. near Morristown, the financial difficulties of the Continental Congress in paying the troops. the suffering of the troops in Jockey Hollow, and the threats to mutiny and refusals to re-up. Given the paucity of literature on this period, this work is provides valuable insights into Washington's and his men's perseverance during a period that set the stage for their later victory.
This book was made very unentertaining by the reader as our librarian read it out loud to us and it couldn't have been more boring. Maybe the book is good and it was just the reader......