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Download Do You Remember?: The Whimsical Letters of H. L. Mencken and Philip Goodman eBook

by Jack Sanders

Download Do You Remember?: The Whimsical Letters of H. L. Mencken and Philip Goodman eBook
ISBN:
0938420542
Author:
Jack Sanders
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Maryland Historical Society; 1st edition (January 1, 1976)
Pages:
208 pages
EPUB book:
1319 kb
FB2 book:
1120 kb
DJVU:
1100 kb
Other formats
lrf mobi docx rtf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
890


Do You Remember? book. Mencken rose instantly to the challenge and wrote a letter in similar vein. For three years the correspondents tried to out-do each other in telling tall stories

Do You Remember? book. For three years the correspondents tried to out-do each other in telling tall stories. Sanders has reconstructed and annotated this correspondence.

Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. Philip Goodman, Jack Sanders, H. L. Mencken. 100% Money Back Guarantee.

The Whimsical Letters of H. Mencken and Philip Goodman. by Philip Goodman, . Mencken, Jack Sanders.

Are you sure you want to remove Do you remember? from your list? There's no description for this book ye. Do you remember?: the whimsical letters of .

Do you remember?: the whimsical letters of . 1996, Maryland Historical Society.

Do You Remember? The Whimsical Letters of H. He invented characters and events and wrote with irony and affection for those better times.

Henry Louis Mencken (September 12, 1880 – January 29, 1956) was an American journalist, essayist, satirist, cultural critic and scholar of American English.

Henry Louis Mencken was born in Baltimore, Maryland on 12 September 1880 .

Do you remember when we first met? .

Do you remember when we first met? I sure do It was some time in early September Though you were lazy about it, you made me wait around I was so crazy about you I didn't mind. Do you remember when we first moved in together? The piano took up the living room You played me boogie-woogie I played you love songs You'd say we're playing house now you still say we are. We built our getaway up in a tree we found We felt so far away but we were still in town Now I remember watching that old tree burn down I took a picture that I don't like to look at.

H. Mencken: Confessions of a Believing Critic

H. Mencken: Confessions of a Believing Critic. Christopher Hitchens - . Mencken Memorial Lecture. An American Iconoclast: . Mencken - The 20th Century's Greatest Journalist (2005).

Mencken rose instantly to the challenge and wrote a letter in similar vein

He invented characters and events and wrote with irony and affection for those better times. For three years the correspondents tried to out-do each other in telling tall stories

In 1918, while Henry Louis Mencken was editing The Smart Set in New York and working on The American Language in his native Baltimore, his best friend, Philip Goodman, a New York advertising man, bon vivant, and fledgling publisher, wrote a letter "reminiscing" about their old German-American neighborhood in the 1880s and 1890s. He invented characters and events and wrote with irony and affection for those better times. Mencken rose instantly to the challenge and wrote a letter in similar vein. For three years the correspondents tried to out-do each other in telling tall stories. Sanders has reconstructed and annotated this correspondence.

  • Voodoogore
The discovery of a "new" book of H. L. Mencken's writing is always a special pleasure for those of us who love the old grouch and his work. This particular book, however, is something of an oddity. Anyone who has read much Mencken will be familliar with the style; from the scurrilous asides he liked to sprinkle into his narratives. In his published writing they served as a condiment, adding a scandalous spice to accounts of Political Conventions and the like. Here they are the whole meal, and it can become something of a muchness.
The subtitle "The Whimsical Letters..." is somewhat misleading. Whimsy has overtones of gentility, like two little old ladies exchanging stories about the faries that live in their gardens. Here we have two old so and so's raking up scandal in the "Old Neighborhood"; indulging in vulgarity, innuendo, and (had the subjects of their discourse been real) slander.
Fans of Mencken (and, presumably, of Goodman) will probably enjoy the book, although it is not a new Newspaper Days or Prejudices. Non fans should probably avoid it until they are familliar with Mencken and his world. This is not a good introduction.
  • Bodwyn
A beautiful book, nicely edited with notes so that you can get the obscure references, and funny--nay, uproarious--impromtu tall tales. Mencken and Goodman knowingly comment on the goings-on of all-too-human folk, with Olympian and sunlit wit and detachment. If you like to read Mencken, don't miss this one.