almediah.fr
» » The Yellowstone Story: A History of Our First National Park VOL. 1

Download The Yellowstone Story: A History of Our First National Park VOL. 1 eBook

by Aubrey L. Haines

Download The Yellowstone Story: A History of Our First National Park VOL. 1 eBook
ISBN:
0870811045
Author:
Aubrey L. Haines
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Univ Pr of Colorado; First Edition edition (June 1, 1977)
Pages:
401 pages
EPUB book:
1407 kb
FB2 book:
1721 kb
DJVU:
1118 kb
Other formats
mobi lrf doc txt
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
111


Aubrey Hains's two-volume set on Yellowstone National Park is the authoritative history of the first American national park.

Aubrey Hains's two-volume set on Yellowstone National Park is the authoritative history of the first American national park.

The Yellowstone Story book. The Yellowstone Story traces the history of the Yellowstone region from the time when hunters and gatherers migrated into the Rocky Mountains thousands of years ago to the post-World War II era when tourists began inundating Yellowstone National Park.

Haines, Aubrey L. Publication date. Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. : Yellowstone Library and Museum Association. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

First published in 1977, former park historian Aubrey Haines's two-volume set on Yellowstone National Park has long been acknowledged as the authoritative history of the United State's first national park. Now updated with new photographs and revised text, The Yellowstone Story covers the park from prehistoric times through the Native Americans and early explorers to the establishment of the park and increasing use. It concludes with a discussion of the alternative policy choices that park administrators and the public will confront in the near future.

Mobile version (beta). The Yellowstone Story : A History of Our First National Park : Volume 1. Aubrey L. Haines. Download (epub, . 6 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format. (1977). The Yellowstone Story-A History of Our First National Park. Yellowstone National Park, WY: Yellowstone Library and Museum Association. Haines, Aubrey L. (1996). I (Second Revised e. Niwot, CO: University Press of Colorado. The following references are primarily related to promoting tourism and recreational opportunities in the park, to include memoirs and recollections of prominent tourist experiences. Biddulph, Stephan P. (2013). Five Old Men-The Rise of Interpretation in the First National Park. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press.

The Yellowstone Story, Volume I : A History of Our First National Park. By (author) Aubrey L.

Author: Aubrey L. Yellowstone National Park.

The Yellowstone Story traces the history of the Yellowstone region from the time when hunters and gatherers migrated into the Rocky Mountains thousands of years ago to the post-World War II era when tourists began inundating Yellowstone National Park. Volume II covers the years of military administration of the park and the more recent developments under the National Park Service.

The Yellowstone Story A History of Our First National Park VOL. 1
  • Whilingudw
This book is part one of a two-volume history of Yellowstone National Park, written by a long-time park historian. Haines is an old-style historian, the kind who could write a book entitled "Yellowstone Place Names," or begin this book with a chapter on the name of the park. He has maps showing the dates in which today's Yellowstone changed hands from France, England, or Spain; or from Louisiana to Missouri to Nebraska to Dakota to Idaho to the current states. He likes documenting such things. His years in the National Park Service did not train him to think outside the box.

But those years also taught him the park inside out. The book is full of little hints about special places off the beaten track, unmarked on any map. Haines also knows the park's history thoroughly. He commands the facts and can weigh in on various debates about this and that. As a result, this book is a valuable reference for those interested in Yellowstone.

The book is a great source of anecdotes about early visitors. Haines spends a lot of time on the mountain men who were the first whites in the area. He tells the story of each American expedition in the region. He introduces us to all the early Euro-American settlers. (He also spends a little time on the pre-European Natives.) Though Haines is not self-conscious about what he's doing, this story fits into he usual one of Conquest, of Explorers taming the land.

What, in Haines' mind, does it all add up to? It's not clear. Haines is not one to give you an overall narrative. He does not give us an interpretation of the park and its history. He doesn't tell us why the park's story is important to tell.

That, dear reader, is left to you. When you do it, though, you'll want this book on your shelf to refer to.
  • Vizuru
My interest in Yellowstone history was founded in my father's tales as I matured. He was born in 1886, and virtually orphaned at age four. Ten years later he ran away from the orphanage, and headed west from Iowa. Among his life experiences, there was a period as a stage coach driver for tourists visiting the young park. Included was a wintering at the then new Old Faithful Lodge. His caretaking included removing snow buildups on the dangerously steep and high roof areas. In Yellowstone he carried a required six gun, to clear rattle snakes from the roads where horses bolted when sensing a snake in the path of the stages. I have that gun, still in good condition, for the protection of our home and our family. My father subsequently homesteaded land in the Dakotas, becoming a cattle rancher. An older brother was the sheriff in the closest town. In those times, nearby reservation Indians routinely entered the town and galloped their horses down the unimproved main street, firing their rifles in the air. They had had too much liquor, and felt free to let off steam for the Pale Faces.

In Volume 1, there is an account of the grand opening of Yellowstone in 1880. It involves the Battle of The Big Hole, and the involvement of the Nez Perce Chief Joseph. He refused to relocate to a reservation. Instead his tribe was moving in total from what is today the northeasterly corner of Oregon, and had entered the westerly areas of the new park. My dad knew what was occurring there, as well as he new about the Battle at the Little Bighorn, and Custer's defeat. Indians for him were a reality. I and my son have visited the Big Hole Battlefield and also the location where Joseph surrendered in Montana near the border with Canada. My daughter and I have spent time in Yellowstone. We've immersed ourselves in the beauty of the park and its history.

The reason I wanted to acquire Vol. 1, is that I had read much of Vol. 2. The irony of what was happening in in the earlier years of the Park's opening in 1880, was that hundreds of visitors and leaders from elsewhere in the world were being entertained on its eastern side, while the short war with Joseph's tribe was taking place in the Park's western reaches. Many violent deaths happened, both Indians and whites, while the Army and Indians clashed. Some of the dead were visitors. Both volumes are fascinating reading.
  • Stonewing
I really wanted to like this book more than I did. It gets down right boring and plodding to read.
  • greed style
I had actually owned this two-volume set years ago, but over the years lost them. I am a history buff and a long-time lover of all things Yellowstone. Aubrey Haines does a wonderful job of chronicling the history of America's first national park from prehistoric visitors to modern times. I love this work and was thrilled to be able to acquire it again!
  • Levion
Magnificent and comprehensive review of how the Park got where it is today. Well documented/ particularly enjoyed the passion for the land and its inhabitants. My family grew up on the edge of the Park and this book greatlly enhanced my understanding of their history.
  • Qag
very detailed, covers many facets of Yellowstone development over long time span. Extensive notes for those interested in persuing more detailed research. More for the history addict than beach blanket reading.
  • Gavikelv
Haines' complete "Yellowstone Story", vol. 1 and 2, are what can only be described as sensational. The sheer volume of intricate detail leaves the reader feeling as if he or she had lived each moment or event. From the race to "discover" the area to the push to "civilize" it, the reader is left feeling sad that an era of exploration, inginuity and discovery is now far behind us. But, at least for a few brief moments, Haines is able to bring us back to that time and to impart to us the sense of history and pride and wonder that many of the parks earliest vistors must have felt. This book is not for the casual visitor of Yellowstone, rather, it is for the rabid fan of Wonderland!! Enjoy!!
This book isn't what I'd call a "light read." It's a hard-core history book packed with detail, verification of the detail, and even more detail. At times, this depth is fascinating. At others, it's a little dry. If you're looking for the facts mixed with some really great stories, you'll love this book.