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Download Confederate Florida: The Road to Olustee eBook

by William H. Nulty

Download Confederate Florida: The Road to Olustee eBook
ISBN:
0817307486
Author:
William H. Nulty
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
University Alabama Press; First Paperback edition (January 30, 1994)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1655 kb
FB2 book:
1936 kb
DJVU:
1524 kb
Other formats
lit lrf mobi txt
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
868


The University of Alabama Press.

The University of Alabama Press. The paper on which this book is printed meets the minimum requirements of American National Standard for Information Science-Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials, ANSI A3. 8-1984. Nulty, William H. Confederate Florida: the road to Olustee, William H. Nulty. p. cm. Bibliography: p. Includes index. 1. Olustee (Fl., Battle of, 1864. 2. l War, 1861-1864-Campaigns.

William H. Nulty for above and beyond the call for such a detailed and outstanding work. I very much appreciate his efforts. The book’s primary focus is the Battle of Olustee which is down the road from where I reside and which I travel by each time I go to Jacksonville or Gainesville.

Confederate Florida book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Confederate Florida: The Road to Olustee as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Download books for free. William H. Nulty The engagement at Olustee, not far from Gainesville, took place on February 20, 1864

Download books for free. At the end of 1863 the Federal forces in the Department of the South were tied up in siege operations against Charleston and Savannah, operations that showed little progress or promise. The engagement at Olustee, not far from Gainesville, took place on February 20, 1864. it was the largest Civil War battle in Florida and one of the bloodiest Union defeats of the entire war.

Graves of unknown Confederate soldiers killed at Olustee or died in Confederate hospitals located in Lake City . The Civil War Books of Lists. 1990. Confederate Florida: The Road to Olustee. University of Alabama Press.

Graves of unknown Confederate soldiers killed at Olustee or died in Confederate hospitals located in Lake City, Florida. Union casualties were 203 killed, 1,152 wounded, and 506 missing, a total of 1,861 men-about 34 percent. Confederate losses were lower: 93 killed, 847 wounded, and 6 missing, a total of 946 casualties in all-but still about 19 percent. Book Sales, Inc. ISBN 0-7858-1702-6.

Confederate Mobile: A Pictorial History. Mobile, Alabama: Haunted Book Shop, 1971 Nulty, William H. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1994. Mobile, Alabama: Haunted Book Shop, 1971. Denman, Clarence P. The Secession Movement in Alabama. Montgomery, Alabama: Alabama State Department of Archives and History, 1933. The Alabama Confederate Reader: An Exciting Story of the Civil War in Alabama. Severance, Ben H. Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Alabama in the Civil War. 2012. ISBN 978-0-8173-0748-6.

A Confederate victory in a strange place of palm trees and swamp grass, the Battle of Olustee took . Confederate Florida: The Road to Olustee, by William H. Register for the Event.

A Confederate victory in a strange place of palm trees and swamp grass, the Battle of Olustee took place hundreds of miles from the main theaters of action. The army of Georgia and Florida Regiments routed an army of New York, Massachusetts and Colored troops-for the Union, the second bloodiest battle of the war per number of troops engaged. Definitely worth more than a month’s worth of book lessons! And to be remembered for so much longer! Best of all, the tour was Christ-centered in every aspect.

Nulty, William H. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1990. Schafer, Daniel L. "Freedom Was As Close As the River: African Americans and the Civil War in Northeast Florida.

Florida in the Civil War: Olustee, Florida's Bloodiest Battle. Battle of Olustee, Florida. Florida Travel: Visit Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park.

At the end of 1863 the Federal forces in the Department of the South were tied up in siege operations against Charleston and Savannah, operations that showed little progress or promise. The commander of the Department, Major General Quincy A. Gillmore, led an expedition into Florida to recruit blacks, cut off commissary supplies headed for other parts of the Confederacy, and disrupt the railroad system within Florida. Expedition forces landed at Jacksonville on February 7, 1864. The engagement at Olustee, not far from Gainesville, took place on February 20, 1864. it was the largest Civil War battle in Florida and one of the bloodiest Union defeats of the entire war. Nonetheless, because the engagement forced the Confederacy to divert 15,000 men from the thinly manned defense of Charleston and Savannah, it delayed critical reinforcement of the Army of Tennessee, which was fighting desperately to prevent the Union invasion of northwestern Georgia. Makin use of detailed maps and diagrams, Nulty presents a vivid account of this fascination Civil War effort.
  • Benn
I found this book in a book shop in Savannah in February while attending a meeting. I recently purchased it with other items from Amazon and was pleasantly surprised that the work filled in many gaps to my understanding of the 1864 period in Civil War Florida.
This book is much to my liking. Written as a research paper with copious references in order of presentation in the text. It reads easy, fast, and concise even for the non-historian. Kudos to Lt. Col. William H. Nulty for above and beyond the call for such a detailed and outstanding work. I very much appreciate his efforts.
The book’s primary focus is the Battle of Olustee which is down the road from where I reside and which I travel by each time I go to Jacksonville or Gainesville. I have been to the battlefield site which is not impressive; but this book brings out the entire story of the events that led to the battle, reasons for Union expedition, a description of the battle, and the aftermath. For the military historian the battle chapter needs to be read twice to understand the maneuver or lack thereof of the combatants. If you’re wondering where the Fifty-Fourth Black Massachusetts went to after the movie” Glory” assault on Ft. Wagner, it was here. If you would like to know what happened to them read this book.
  • Jazu
Were I teaching at West Point as a professor of logistics and or strategy this would be a core requirement. Excellently written with a full bibliography and lots of facts. We learn about the very importance of Florida to the Confederacy's cause. From a source of cattle resources to railroad timber and metal. We also see where, had the Union made a more substantial effort they could have possibly done a lot of damage to the Confederate Cause but unlike General Sherman in Atlanta, Quincy Gilmore and Truman Seymour failed to realize and think outside their boxes. Though the Battle of Olustee was a Union defeat (And for the tactician in you the chapter on the battle is a classic study of the "Defeat-In-Detail" strategy much sought after by commanders) it essentially was a successful diversian and led to the South's logistical problems elsewhere. Fairly easy to read, we get a lot of the political background (Lincoln at first debated about getting Florida back into the Union), social background(the recruitment of Florida blacks into the Negro Regiments, scared Southerners immensely though in actuality very few were actually recruited, so a decisive Union "Scare Tactic") and Military background (General Beauregard was fairly the only Southern or Northern general that realized how vital it was to stop the Union encroachment into Central Florida). Lucky for the Union,Confederate Brig General Finnegan, who was almost as Inept as Brig General Seymour, failed to follow up on essentially his subordinates (most notably Gen. Colquitt)victory with his lack of pursuit. As a side note, the 54th Massachusetts' bravery here was in my opinion, more so than at Battery Wagner, marching 102 miles in 150 hrs, forming the rear-guard as the rest of the Union line collapsed, even after that, dragging a broken down locomotive and cars nearly ten miles that contained wounded comrades who otherwise surely faced capture and all this and they were still not being paid (not until later that year would they receive back pay at the rate equal to their Caucasian comrades in arms).
  • Zieryn
This book has a lot of factual information on the Battle of Ocean Pond. This is a Yankee excuse manual as to why the Union got their tails whipped at Olustee Florida. This whole book is written in obvious bias blue ink. There is much unit detail given to all the Union troops and their strengths and deployments. You will hear all about how they had poor leadership, poor operating weapons, inexperienced troops ect. The Union was not in short supply of ordinance so a change of performing rifles to broken non working rifles seems questionable. Why did these soldiers have these broken weapons in an active war zone. The placement and use of Black Troops is questionable too. What is not really given any real credit is the tactical genius and logistics that was exhibited by the Confederates, to counter the large Union presence that was thrown into Florida. The ability to read the Union mindset and move units at a moments notice shows the tenacity and brilliance Southern leaders. This is the reason that so many battles were won by the Confederates. Excellance in adaptability.
If you are a Bluecoat this book will be a good read. Greys will wonder how and why the Confederate Army gets so liitle credit on a spledid victory.
  • Der Bat
This is a very thorough history of the Union movements before, during and after the Battle of Olustee Florida. Unfortunately, it is a bias exercise as a source for the Confederate History of this battle. It is definitely written in blue ink. It does a terrible injustice to the heroic and fighting spirit displayed by the southern forces. It seems, every excuse is made to explain the errors and blunders that occurred by the Yankee Army. The truth is that the Union was whipped soundly in the field by the Confederate Army. If any side had a advantage, it was the Union. If you want a fair evaluation of this battle, this isn't it. Most of this book is Monday quarterbacking, with lots of excuses as to why the Union lost this battle. The fact that the Confederacy was doomed by attrition in men and surplus from the very beginning, makes their victories worthy of the greatest praise and honor. The author did include a great deal of history, and the story is easy to follow. I also liked the maps showing the battle as it progressed.