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Download Peace and War on the Anglo-Cherokee Frontier, 1756--63 eBook

by John Stuart Oliphant

Download Peace and War on the Anglo-Cherokee Frontier, 1756--63 eBook
ISBN:
0807126373
Author:
John Stuart Oliphant
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
LSU Press (June 1, 2001)
Pages:
269 pages
EPUB book:
1246 kb
FB2 book:
1731 kb
DJVU:
1739 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
164


As Oliphant shows, war and treaty increased the Cherokee's chances of stabilizing their South Carolina frontier, and thanks to an imperial policy of protection and conciliation and dogged individuals such as James Grant, John Stuart, Cherokee leader Attakullakulla, and their collaborators.

As Oliphant shows, war and treaty increased the Cherokee's chances of stabilizing their South Carolina frontier, and thanks to an imperial policy of protection and conciliation and dogged individuals such as James Grant, John Stuart, Cherokee leader Attakullakulla, and their collaborators, rivals, and colleagues, a firmly defined boundary was finally attained in 1766. An important addition to the history of American Indians and British agents, Peace and War on the Anglo-Cherokee Frontier, 1756-1763 will be of interest to all scholars and students of colonial America.

Oliphant demonstrates that arrogance, misunderstanding and simple villainy were amply present on both sides and bade fair to create a state of permanent war on the Cherokee frontier in the Carolina Alleghanies. The tide turned, however, when a body of leaders took control of the situation and pursued a moderate solution: British Col. Richard Montgomery and Col. James Grant rebuilt Cherokee trust in British intentions.

The savage Anglo-Cherokee war was resolved by Cherokee headmen willing to accept . Bibliographic Information. Peace and War on the Anglo-Cherokee Frontier, 1756–63.

The savage Anglo-Cherokee war was resolved by Cherokee headmen willing to accept a dignified peace; and by the sympathy of the very man sent to crush them. Colonel James Grant forced his treaty upon South Carolina, demonstrated the value of imperial frontier management and started some Carolinians on the road to revolution. In his time he has been a successful school teacher, a clerk, and tax collector as well as scholar.

This book is a fitting testament to their contributions

Peace and War on the Anglo-Cherokee Frontier, 1756–63 J. Oliphant Springer 9780333778395 : While the Seven Years War pushed London towards a protective Native American policy, outcomes were d. This book is a fitting testament to their contributions. From passionate speeches to articulately drafted personal letters, Carney helps readers explore the many nuances of these timeless voices.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 9. 5% restored. Главная Peace and War on the Anglo-Cherokee Frontier, 1756–63. Format Hardback 269 pages.

John Oliphant has produced a useful, thorough study of the Anglo- Cherokee War (1760-61). Other historians-notably, David Corkran in The Cherokee Frontier (1962) and Gregory Dowd in several articles-have explored this moment of crisis in the otherwise longstanding alliance between the Cherokee Nation and Great Britain. Oliphant's contribution is in providing such a detailed, straightforward narrative of the war, from its initial causes to the most significant military engagements and eventually to the series of peace treaties that finally brought an end to the conflict.

Peace and War on the Anglo-Cherokee Frontier, 1756–63. Tortora, Daniel J. Carolina in Crisis: Cherokees, Colonists, and Slaves in the American Southeast, 1756–1763. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 2001. The Memoirs of Lt. Henry Timberlake: The Story of a Soldier, Adventurer, and Emissary to the Cherokees, 1756-1765. Museum of the Cherokee Indian Press, 2007. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2015.

In the winter of 1760, Cherokee warriors attacked the South Carolina frontier, driving British settlements back over one hundred miles. Intrusive colonists, the failing deerskin trade, and the treachery of a British governor all contributed to the collapse of trust between the two vastly different cultures, and Cherokee leaders and imperial commanders struggled to reestablish a fragile middle ground, negotiating a peace based on protection and consensus.

Previous works have suggested that extreme cultural differences between Indians and whites and especially colonial expansionism led inevitably to the Anglo-Cherokee War of 1759--1761, but in this original study, John Oliphant emphasizes the central role of individuals in shaping the course of relations between the two societies. Oliphant argues that in a world where four colonial governments, an over-burdened Superintendent of Indian Affairs, and the increasingly important military commanders all competed for a share of southern Indian relations, determined individuals could--and did--have an immense influence over Anglo-Amerindian relations.

As Oliphant shows, war and treaty increased the Cherokee's chances of stabilizing their South Carolina frontier, and thanks to an imperial policy of protection and conciliation and dogged individuals such as James Grant, John Stuart, Cherokee leader Attakullakulla, and their collaborators, rivals, and colleagues, a firmly defined boundary was finally attained in 1766. An important addition to the history of American Indians and British agents, Peace and War on the Anglo-Cherokee Frontier, 1756-1763 will be of interest to all scholars and students of colonial America.