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Download The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Old West eBook

by Peter Newark

Download The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Old West eBook
ISBN:
0831765992
Author:
Peter Newark
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Gallery Books; Reprint edition (January 1, 1985)
EPUB book:
1345 kb
FB2 book:
1753 kb
DJVU:
1213 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
443


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Authors: Newark, Peter. Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Old West. We hope you enjoy your book and that it arrives quickly and is as expected. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Old West by Peter Newark (Paperback). Pre-owned: lowest price.

Find nearly any book by Peter Newark. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Old West: An Illustrated History of Cowboys and Indians. by Peter Newark, Robin May. ISBN 9780831765828 (978-0-8317-6582-8) Hardcover, Gallery Books, 1985.

Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Old West'. Baptist City Mission, Baptists, City missions. What has the author Peter McBrien written?

Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Old West'. What has the author Peter McBrien written? Peter McBrien has written: 'Poems'. What has the author Peter Daddone written? Peter Daddone has written: 'In the Black'. What has the author PETER HUMFREY written? PETER HUMFREY has written: 'CARPACCIO'.

Peter Newark's encyclopedia of the Old West covers people, places, and things west of the Mississippi River, and during the 19'th century. As an encyclopedia, it covers subjects alphabetically, from "Abilene, Kansas" to "Zuni Indians

Peter Newark's encyclopedia of the Old West covers people, places, and things west of the Mississippi River, and during the 19'th century. As an encyclopedia, it covers subjects alphabetically, from "Abilene, Kansas" to "Zuni Indians.

Illustrated Encyclopedia of Battleships. It has a lot of information but suffers from a lack of diagrams. It is not quite what I hoped for.

With more than 200 photographs, illustrations and paintings, the book is a must-have for anyone interested in the history of ships and the conflicts of the period. Illustrated Encyclopedia of Battleships.

This wonderfully illustrated book begins with a history of the truck, covering its origins, evolution, and the early pioneers of truck design and engineering. A wide variety of trucks are featured, with more than 700 photographs, from general load carriers such as box vans and furniture- removal vans, to specialized vehicles such as fire trucks, military trucks and mobile cranes. Trucks from Europe, North America and many other countries are discussed, highlighting differences in design and the manufacturers who made them.

Here are some of the beautiful Old West books that have passed through my hands and now reside in private collections. America PICTURESQUE Illustrated ANTIQUE . TRAVEL Railroad OLD WEST Indians. Neetmok Rare & Antique Books. Old Books About the Old West.

Information about the people, places, and events of America's Old West is enlightened with hundreds of vintage photographs and portraits
  • Ustamya
My husband loved it.
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Peter Newark's encyclopedia of the Old West covers people, places, and things west of the Mississippi River, and during the 19'th century. As an encyclopedia, it covers subjects alphabetically, from "Abilene, Kansas" to "Zuni Indians." In addition, there is a brief introduction, a condensed table of major events, a table showing when the various states were admitted into the Union, a pretty nice map, and an alphabetical list of entries at the back of the book.
The book tends to cover each topic in a somewhat truncated manner. And, of course, it's not necessarily intended to be read cover to cover. It's really the sort of book that should be left out on the coffee table, and read at odd times during the day, by kids, adults, and the occasional visitor who happens to notice it. I find our copy wandering around the house, from room to room, as first one person, and then another, picks it up, reads a bit, and lays it down for the next curious interloper.
The book is nicely illustrated with black-and-white drawings and vintage photographs. The photographs, in particular, help capture the flavor and essence of the Old West, from the image of hunters posing with their kill of a grizzly bear to a close up of one of the saddles used by the riders of the pony express. Looking through some of these old photographs I could almost smell the dusty leather and the horse sweat that left it stained. Some of the images are touching; others are gruesome. Together, they paint a picture of rugged individualism garnished with frequent personal tragedy. One photograph, in particular, touches me deeply. It is that of the frozen corpse of Chief Big Foot, killed during the massacre at Wounded Knee.
For me, this book resurrects memories of working my grandfather's ranch in northeast Utah, set against the foothills of the high Uinta Mountains, not far from Fort Bridger. Although my grandfather (James Kent Olson) was born just after the end of the 19'th century, he instilled in me a love for the vanished lifestyle that died with the last of the cowboys. Knowing my love for the Old West, my mother in law bought me this book for Christmas. It's been one of the nicest presents I've had in a long time.
Having grown up with just a taste of the Old West, I immediately looked up Fort Bridger, which was just 30 miles from Grandfather's ranch. As a kid I would sometimes go there with my aunts and cousins, and wonder what it must have been like to have live in the Wild West. We had our horses, and we knew ranch work. Still, it was a sanitized version, and I complained bitterly at having missed the opportunity to grow up in the "real" Old West. My constant lamentations frequently left my flabbergasted mother to proclaim that I'd been born 100 years to late.
Next, I read the section on Butch Cassidy. As a young boy I would coax my grandmother, Sara, to tell me about Butch Cassidy and his gang. Butch supposedly had a hideout near the Green River gorge, not far from the ranch, and she would tell me stories about how Butch would ride through the area. As a young boy I would take my horse up into the hills after cutting and stacking hay, and explore the canyons where wild daydreams filled my head of finding Butch's old hideout.
Reading this book, I often felt transported me back in time. Seeing a photograph of an old pair of spurs I found myself back on the ranch thirty years ago, in the old ranch-house kitchen with Grandmother as she set about cooking chicken wings for lunch. With a creak the old screen door opened and then slammed as Grandfather came in from riding the irrigation ditch. He took of his hat, stained with sweat, and slapped off the dust as he hung it in the entryway. Coming across the old wood floor, I could hear his spurs ringing with each heavy footstep as he walked through the sunbeam that shone through the kitchen window, kissed Grandmother, and noted with approval the aroma of our noonday meal.
Flipping through the pages I came across a black-and-white photograph of an old Remington army pistol and suddenly found myself by Grandfather's side as he gazed along the sights at a rock sitting on a small knoll, the pistol held firmly in his big hands. He took steel aim at the target with his deep blue eyes, and with a tremendous roar the gun discharged and the rock went sailing through the air. He grinned at me with a knowing smile as the thick acrid smoke wafted away through the afternoon sunshine, and I realized, as I gazed across the green hayfields to the Wyoming badlands in the distance, what heaven must be like.
At almost every page I found nostalgia and the old ache that's stayed with me since I was 16 years and working that old ranch. The world moves on. Today, cowboys are just a dream. That way of life is gone, but a part of it lives on in books like this, and particularly in the frozen moments in time that have been captured on film, leaving bits and pieces of clues about the way the Old West was fought, won, and drifted into history.