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Download 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York eBook

by Clifton Hood

Download 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York eBook
ISBN:
0801880548
Author:
Clifton Hood
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press; Centennial edition (August 23, 2004)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1312 kb
FB2 book:
1728 kb
DJVU:
1717 kb
Other formats
azw mbr mobi txt
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
979


Clifton Hood is associate professor of history at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, New York. He was formerly a curator of the LaGuardia Archives at LaGuardia College, City University of New York.

Clifton Hood is associate professor of history at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, New York. From the germ of an idea based on similar attempts all over the globe, to the planning and construction of the multi-layered system of tracks, tunnels, signals and stations that make up New York's 722-mile system, the world's longest, are discussed with both passion and detail.

In this definitive history, Clifton Hood traces the complex and fascinating story of the New York City subway system, one of the urban engineering marvels of the twentieth century.

Clifton Hood's 722 Miles. my only criticism of this book is that 1/3 of it is of footnotes. when the book ended, there was too much reference material here. the jackson heights subway line info is interesting as it is not common to focus on an area outsideof manhattan as much

Clifton Hood's 722 Miles. the jackson heights subway line info is interesting as it is not common to focus on an area outsideof manhattan as much. the poltical machinisms to get the work done are a worthy read.

In this definitive history, Clifton Hood traces the complex and fascinating story of the New York City subway system, one . When it first opened on October 27, 1904, the New York City subway ran twenty-two miles from City Hall to 145th Street and Lenox Avenue-the longest stretch ever built at one time.

- Nathan Glazer, Harvard University. Describes how the subway attempted to meet the enormous need to move urban residents far faster than any existing form of mass transit (primarily the elevated railway and the streetcar) and disperse the growing population into unsettled areas at the fringe of the city. An interesting read, describing how the subway helped shape New York City.

In 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York, Clifton Hood wrote, "Belmont's foul temperament was his main failing. The fat little banker was arrogant, pompous, mean-spirited and quick to anger

In 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York, Clifton Hood wrote, "Belmont's foul temperament was his main failing. The fat little banker was arrogant, pompous, mean-spirited and quick to anger. He sometimes flew into a rage when not accorded the obsequious treatment he thought was due a gentleman of his elevated station.

A thorough history follows the evolution of the New York subway system from visionary idea, through political machinations and feats of urban planning, to engineering reality, and looks at the diverse ways in which mass transportation has shaped New York City and the lives of its inhabitants. 722 Miles: The Building Of The Subways And How They Transformed New York. Get specific details about this product from customers who own it.

The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York. Hood provides a few fresh insights, however, as when he analyzes the discriminatory practices that shaped the original development of the Jackson Heights section of Queens.

Clifton Hood is professor of history at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. He is the author of 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York. Simon & Schuster, 1993; Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995) and In Pursuit of Privilege: The Upper Class and the Making of New York City, since 1753 (Columbia 2016). In Pursuit of Privilege. One fee. Stacks of books.

Clifton Hood, 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York. New York: Simon Schuster, 1993.

When it first opened on October 27, 1904, the New York City subway ran twenty-two miles from City Hall to 145th Street and Lenox Avenue―the longest stretch ever built at one time. From that initial route through the completion of the IND or Independent Subway line in the 1940s, the subway grew to cover 722 miles―long enough to reach from New York to Chicago.

In this definitive history, Clifton Hood traces the complex and fascinating story of the New York City subway system, one of the urban engineering marvels of the twentieth century. For the subway's centennial the author supplies a new foreward explaining that now, after a century, "we can see more clearly than ever that this rapid transit system is among the twentieth century's greatest urban achievements."

  • Araath
Having lived in NYC most of my life, I wanted to find a book which provided a comprehensive overview of the development of our public transit network, from the omnibus of the Civil War era to the present period. This book does it, and without running to encyclopedic length (its about 260 pages, not counting about 50 pages of supportive notes/footnotes).

A good deal of attention is given to the political machinations which were of such importance in building our current complex route system, including unfortunate gaffs, payoffs and a frequent lack of vision. (Editorial note: What we have is wonderful; what we might have had would be a marvel (like the rest of America, NYC has a history of periodic distain for public transit infrastructure development, preferring instead to nurture a love affair with the automobile - think Robert Moses).

The book also emphasizes the impact of subway extensions from lower Manhattan into the upper reaches of the borough (Washington Heights, Inwood etc), as well as Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx. At least for a NYer, this is fascinating stuff, and the author uses examples, such as Jackson Heights in Queens, to illustrate the "before and after" impact of bringing multiple lines into what were farmlands and open fields just 100 years ago. The author provides lots of interesting and supportive statistics. There is also an excellent index along with over 50 pages of source footnotes.

The only real failing of the book is a lack of decent maps and a curious avoidance of using current line designations (ie, E train, #7 line etc) to quickly identify line routes as they were built in spurts starting in about 1900), preferring instead to use the old general designations (like IRT, BMT, IND), which no one under 60 remembers.

There are some photos, but they are few and of inferior quality. (See online sites like Museum of the City of NY, NY Historical Society, NYPL, NYC Transit Museum etc for great photo collections). There are also many books in print with photos of various facets of NYC transit history.

Bottom line though, I highly recommend this work. If it had decent maps, I'd give it 5 stars.
  • I ℓ٥ﻻ ﻉ√٥υ
Reading towards the end, the book skipped from page 207 to page 241! This made it a little hard to follow in the continuity of the timeline the book is about. Otherwise, the book merits three stars, as it reads like a dissertation (which it essentially is). The "updated" version does not add much. The missing pages are a printing error, not a physical error. Amazon has amazing customer service and accepted a return, even after the return period was past (four stars for Amazon customer service!).
  • Anayalore
An Insightful History of How the People of the City that Never Sleeps Got Around.
Ever wonder why Queens is isolated from Brooklyn by rail... read this.
  • melody of you
Good price, fast delivery.
  • Shazel
I worked for the New York City transit system (then known as the New York City Transit Authority) from 1982 to 1987, so I had an "up close and personal" look at what it takes to operate the largest rapid transit railroad in the Western Hemisphere on a daily basis. This book is not the one to read, though, if you're fascinated with the details of daily operations. Try Jim Dwyer's book "Subway Lives" for that.

But if you want a close and expert look at the public policy decisions that drove where and when subway lines were constructed, this is your book. The story of the "dual contracts" is well told. This may be the first example in the United States of a "public-private partnership", as they're now called, with the city building the fixed plant and then contracting with private operators to provide service.

There is also the sad story of "Red Mike" Hylan (his nickname was not due to his hair color), who set out to build a city-owned and city-operated subway with the express aim of bankrupting the two private operators. He got his wish. However, his legacy is the "Independent City-Owned Subway", some of the most magnificent, fast, and high-capacity subway lines ever constructed anywhere. The city could not do without them today.

The last chapters, which cover the city takeover of the two private operators in 1948, are not as comprehensive and well-done as the earlier sections of the book, but this is a minor quibble. Many books and articles cover the history of the New York City Transit Authority, created in 1953 to run the subways, later expanded to run most city buses, and finally folded into the New York MTA in 1967.

All told, an excellent read for any student of public policy and transportation.
  • Delan
I enjoyed reading this book and found it informative and thorough.
I'd recommend it to anyone. Fantastic job Professor Hood!!!!!
  • Deodorant for your language
For any student of public infrastructure in major cities of the world, this chronicle of the building of New York's rapid transit subway system is a must-read. From the germ of an idea based on similar attempts all over the globe, to the planning and construction of the multi-layered system of tracks, tunnels, signals and stations that make up New York's 722-mile system, the world's longest, are discussed with both passion and detail. Clearly Clifton Hood has a feel for his subject, and this reader was caught up in that sweeping enthusiasm. The City of New York grew exponentially in the years following the opening of the first subway line in 1904, expanding the population through the five boroughs and creating one of the largest cities in the entire world. Many of those subway lines continue to serve the public today, having been upgraded as technology changed. Truly a testament to the visionaries and those many thousands of citizens who could support their vision financially and with the hard labor required to build what is truly a Wonder of the World.
I am yet to read this book as I haqve had a number of books before still to be read. I am howver, going to love my books as I always ordered exactly what grab my interest. Interestingly, I order to a New York address, someone I know travelling to Jamaica took it to Montego Bay and send to me via courier. Many times I let them remain at my US address until I get there