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Download The Feud That Wasn’t: The Taylor Ring, Bill Sutton, John Wesley Hardin, and Violence in Texas (Sam Rayburn Series on Rural Life, sponsored by Texas A&M University-Commerce) eBook

by James M. Smallwood

Download The Feud That Wasn’t: The Taylor Ring, Bill Sutton, John Wesley Hardin, and Violence in Texas (Sam Rayburn Series on Rural Life, sponsored by Texas A&M University-Commerce) eBook
ISBN:
1603440178
Author:
James M. Smallwood
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Texas A&M University Press (February 5, 2008)
Pages:
256 pages
EPUB book:
1351 kb
FB2 book:
1191 kb
DJVU:
1961 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
188


The Feud That Wasn’t book. In 1874 in the streets of Comanche, Texas, on his twenty-first birthday, Hardin and two other members of the Taylor ring gunned down Brown County Deputy Charlie Webb.

The Feud That Wasn’t book. This cold-blooded killing-one among many-marked the beginning of the end for the Taylor ring, and Hardin eventually went to the penitentiary as a result. The Feud That Wasn’t reinforces the interpretation that Reconstruction was actually just a continuation of the Civil War in another guise, a thesis Smallwood has advanced in other books and articles.

The Feud That Wasn't : The Taylor Ring, Bill Sutton, John Wesley Hardin, and Violence in Texas. by James M. Smallwood. Marauding outlaws, or violent rebels still bent on fighting the Civil War? For decades, the so-called "Taylor-Sutton feud" has been seen as a bloody vendetta between two opposing gangs of Texas gunfighters.

by James M. Texas A & M University Press, Promotional blurb on dust jacket says "Dr. James Smallwood's work is a major addition to revisionist literature of the era and will undoubtedly produce. Texas A & M University Press,. 8vo. Red cloth, titles stamped in gold gilt on the spine, xxiv, 229 p. foreword, acknowledgments, introduction, illustrated, portraits, maps, afterword, appendix, notes, sources, index. Promotional blurb on dust jacket says "Dr. James Smallwood's work is a major addition to revisionist literature of the era and will undoubtedly produce a stimnlating intellectual debate. Inventory Number: 32233.

The feud that wasn't by James Smallwood, 2008, Texas A&M University . The feud that wasn't. the Taylor ring, Bill Sutton, John Wesley Hardin, and violence in Texas. Prefer the physical book? Check nearby libraries with: WorldCat.

The feud that wasn't. 1st ed. by James Smallwood. Published 2008 by Texas A&M University Press in College Station.

Month Day. August 19. John Wesley Hardin killed in Texas. John Wesley Hardin, one of the bloodiest killers of the Old West, is murdered by an off-duty policeman in a saloon in El Paso, Texas. Born in central Texas on May 26, 1853, Hardin killed his first man when he was only 15 during the violent period of post-Civil War reconstruction.

The true story of famed Texas gunslinger John Wesley Hardin.

The Sutton-Taylor Feud of DeWitt, Gonzales, Karnes, and surrounding counties began shortly . This book presents a study of the Sutton-Taylor Feud

The Sutton-Taylor Feud of DeWitt, Gonzales, Karnes, and surrounding counties began shortly after the Civil War ended. This book presents a study of the Sutton-Taylor Feud.

Of all the Texas feuds, the one between the Sutton and Taylor forces . Bill Sutton stepped down from the hack first, and then helped his pregnant wife Laura, holding her arm gently.

Of all the Texas feuds, the one between the Sutton and Taylor forces lasted longer and covered more ground than any other. William E. Sutton was the only Sutton involved, but he had many friends to wage warfare against the large Taylor family. Texas Rangers attempted to quell the violence, but when they were called away, the killing began again. She was now in her early months, strong, smiling, and confident, but to loving husband Bill she was delicate and fragile, and he was more than ordinarily concerned about her.

Электронная книга "The Sutton-Taylor Feud: The Deadliest Blood Feud in Texas", Chuck Parsons. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Sutton-Taylor Feud: The Deadliest Blood Feud in Texas" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Marauding outlaws, or violent rebels still bent on fighting the Civil War? For decades, the so-called “Taylor-Sutton feud” has been seen as a bloody vendetta between two opposing gangs of Texas gunfighters. However, historian James M. Smallwood here shows that what seemed to be random lawlessness can be interpreted as a pattern of rebellion by a loose confederation of desperadoes who found common cause in their hatred of the Reconstruction government in Texas. Between the 1850s and 1880, almost 200 men rode at one time or another with Creed Taylor and his family through a forty-five-county area of Texas, stealing and killing almost at will, despite heated and often violent opposition from pro-Union law enforcement officials, often led by William Sutton. From 1871 until his eventual arrest, notorious outlaw John Wesley Hardin served as enforcer for the Taylors. In 1874 in the streets of Comanche, Texas, on his twenty-first birthday, Hardin and two other members of the Taylor ring gunned down Brown County Deputy Charlie Webb. This cold-blooded killing—one among many—marked the beginning of the end for the Taylor ring, and Hardin eventually went to the penitentiary as a result. The Feud That Wasn’t reinforces the interpretation that Reconstruction was actually just a continuation of the Civil War in another guise, a thesis Smallwood has advanced in other books and articles. He chronicles in vivid detail the cattle rustling, horse thieving, killing sprees, and attacks on law officials perpetrated by the loosely knit Taylor ring, drawing a composite picture of a group of anti-Reconstruction hoodlums who at various times banded together for criminal purposes. Western historians and those interested in gunfighters and lawmen will heartily enjoy this colorful and meticulously researched narrative.
  • Brakree
Great Book for Family research John Wesley Hardin was a distant cousin of mine, I really got to see how some of the tales of the ole' west happened! The Taylor Gang came from a Patriot and Lawman (Creed Taylor) also a relative.
  • Ylal
Extremely interesting
  • Uscavel
I wished to have more information on John Wesley Hardin's geneology but this was still an great and interesting read.
  • Xar
My wife is a first cousin twice removed from John Wesley Hardin (on his mother's side). This book adds some history to that we have known before, and agrees with what we have known.

It would be a valuable addition to this history to include explicitly the lesson of the tragedy of failure to secure the peace after a war.
  • Angana
Another good book on this famous feud.
  • Vudomuro
I've been researching John Wesley Hardin for years. The Sutton-Taylor Feud ... and believe me, it was a feud ... is a huge part of Hardin's story.
For that reason, I picked up a copy with interest. The author lost me when he started talking about cattle rustling in the 1850s. Heck, why rustle in the 1850s? A cow worth a dollar on the range was worth only $1.25 at the tallow-and-hide plants two hundred miles away on the coast. Rustling was not a big deal. Too much work. Only after the great cattle drives started after the Civil War, when cattle worth a dollar or two could be sold in Kansas for $50 or $75 each did rustling get off the ground.
This and other facts--contemporary accounts calling this a feud, for example--knock the premise right out of this book. The author believes his premise ... but he did not convince me, the reader.
Don't waste any money on this.
  • Livina
John Wesley Hardin was a one-man killing machine who claimed to have shot over forty men to death. His killing spree started at age fifteen and ended nine years later when incarcerated at Huntsville Prison, convicted of second degree murder of a Deputy Sheriff.

How could Hardin get away with murder for that long? The answer is partly provided by James M. Smallwood in his book The Feud That Wasn't.

Smallwood's Thesis

Smallwood's thesis is that the so-called Sutton-Taylor feud was actually an undeclared war between Confederate sympathizer Creed Taylor and his extended clan, and the Texas state authorities represented by the post-war Reconstruction government.

According to Smallwood, Creed Taylor operated a criminal "empire" financed by the post-war burgeoning cattle trade in east Texas. According to the author, the feud was actually the exercise of legitimate law enforcement by state police against a cornpone mafia of the plains.

The Reconstruction state police comprised a large proportion of Negroes (40%) whose previous employment as slaves would naturally result in the holding of grudges against whites in general and white Confederate sympathizers in particular. The arming of so many Negroes to "police" a region populated by hardcore resisters to Reconstruction turned out to be, like so many other post civil war social experiments, a disaster.

Contrary to the author's contention that the conflict was not a feud, it bore all the attributes of a feud. On the Taylor side, the combatants largely consisted of kin and extended family. Both sides engaged in retaliatory vengeance attacks, including outright assassination. The state police forces summarily executed unarmed and bound Taylor family members who were shot while "attempting to escape" or delivered(most likely by prearrangement) into the hands of "vigilantes."

The author's research consists in large part of newspaper accounts but he fails to acknowledge the editorial slant provided by the Reconstructionist (Republican) press. Thus, summary executions that may have been perpetrated by vigilantes and state police posses become "attempts at escape" and gunfights while resisting arrest. The author himself cites numerous instances of the deaths of dozens of Taylor partisans shot while "attempting to escape."

The feud-like nature of the conflict is so apparent even in Smallwood's account that one suspects that the author ignores such evidence to protect his thesis. He provides detailed descriptions of actions by historical characters that could only have been known by eyewitnesses, giving the distinct impression that the author has dramatized the facts which by extension calls into question the validity and objectivity of the presentation.

Factual Errors

Two examples of information presented as factual by the author which other biographers of John Wesley Hardin have dismissed. The author claims that in 1870 Hardin encountered another noted Texas gunman, Bill Longley, in a poker game and that "they came away from their game with mutual grudging respect. Indeed, the two joined forces and started stealing horses from farmers and ranchers in the region." The author claims that "Longley at times rode with the Taylor gang although he did not appear to be a leader like Hardin became once he joined the unholy band."

Hardin's own account in his autobiography has him besting Longley in a high stakes poker game. Longley, preparing to rake in the pot says "I've got an ace full." To which Hardin replies "Hold on, I have two pair." Longley says "They aren't worth a damn." Hardin announces triumphantly "I reckon two pair of jacks are good."

Hardin shows a sense of humor in this story, entertaining for the reader but not necessarily true. A complete reading of his autobiography gives the sense that Hardin isn't shy about embellishing the truth or simply outright lying if the end result is self-aggrandizement. Leon Metz notes in Dark Angel of Texas that "Historians are divided over whether Hardin's autobiographical account of the Longley meeting is true. Hardin's statement is the only support for their encounter."

In any event, Hardin does not claim that he spent much time with Longley or that they shared any criminal adventures. Smallwood's assertion that Longley was some sort of underling in the Taylor "crime ring" simply isn't credible. In fact, the time period of this alleged alliance of Hardin and Longley predates Hardin's own involvement with the Taylors upon his return from a Kansas cattle drive in 1871.

More evidence of a loose interpretation of fact is Smallwood's description of an historical event that occurred while Hardin was on the run. "During the political season of 1876, a fight between political partisans in a Mobile saloon entrapped Hardin and Kennedy. They apparently killed two men, but they threw away their weapons before the police arrived. Arrested for malicious mischief, they spent a few days in jail before being released for lack of evidence." Smallwood gets these facts directly from the Hardin autobiography.

Regarding this same episode, Leon Metz (citing "the Alabama Mobile Register of May 3, 1877), writes `Gus Kennedy and J. H. Swayne (Hardin's alias) were arrested for disorderly conduct on Tuesday last night, and fined $5.'" No deaths were mentioned although one policeman was wounded. Hardin and Kennedy were kicked out of town. So what appears clearly to be another Hardin exaggeration is accepted by Smallwood as fact.

Writing errors

The author's stilted narrative is riddled with clichés so this book, from beginning to end, takes some getting used to. On page 116 he uses the term "ambushcade" (confusion of ambush and ambuscade) and on page 95 his narrative includes cast "dispersion" (for aspersion). It is apparent that the book would have benefited from a thorough copy edit before publication.

There are internal inconsistencies within the book as well. On page 158 the author writes "near the end of 1874, John (Hardin), his wife and his children relocated to the Florida Panhandle" and on page 159 he states "In late January or early February 1875, Bell County Deputy Sheriff William M. York received intelligence that Hardin and Jim Taylor were south of the Rio Grande, information that was true about Taylor but false about Hardin, who was already in Louisiana." How could he be in Louisiana and Florida at the same time? According to Leon Metz, by September 1874 Hardin was living (without his wife and children) in Gainesville, Florida.

This book is useful for anyone who wishes to extend his knowledge about the lawless state of post-civil war Texas. The reader must take care to question some of the author's conclusions, however.