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Download The Divorce Seekers: A Photo Memoir of a Nevada Dude Wrangler eBook

by William W. Bliss,William L. McGee

Download The Divorce Seekers: A Photo Memoir of a Nevada Dude Wrangler eBook
ISBN:
0970167814
Author:
William W. Bliss,William L. McGee
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
BMC Publications; 1st edition (March 1, 2004)
Pages:
444 pages
EPUB book:
1408 kb
FB2 book:
1722 kb
DJVU:
1930 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
478


The Divorce Seekers book.

The Divorce Seekers book. The wealthy and the famous who wanted privacy from the press while they resided in Nevada for six weeks to get a "quickie" divorce often preferred to stay on a dude ranch outside of Reno, and the Flying . was the most exclusive of them all.

Williams interviews former Nevada divorce ranch wrangler Bill McGee at the Western Writers of America Mega-Book Signing, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, Oklahoma City, June 19, 2009. McGee is the author of THE DIVORCE SEEKERS: A PHOTO MEMOIR OF A NEVADA DUDE WRANGLER, an illustrated memoir about his years on the divorce ranch that catered to wealthy Easterners, socialites, and the occasional Hollywood celebrity.

The Divorce Seekers: A Photo Memoir of a Nevada Dude Wrangler, 1947-1949. How I Learned to Sell and Make Deals, 1950-1958. The Broadcasting Years, 1958-1989. A New Year – 12 New Chapters, 365 New Chances December 25, 2019. The Dogs I Have Known in 2 Wars Book 1: Iraq December 18, 2019. In Bill’s honor December 14, 2019.

Bill McGee, recently discharged from the .

book by Sandra V. McGee. The place, Reno, Nevada. Young and handsome Montana cowboy, Bill McGee, recently discharged from the .

The Divorce Seekers: A Photo Memoir of a Nevada Dude Wrangler. Her first marriage resulted in a stay at a Nevada divorce ranch in the early '50s. Norden has sung with big bands, appeared on TV, stage, and in film, and is a professional artist

The Divorce Seekers: A Photo Memoir of a Nevada Dude Wrangler. Norden has sung with big bands, appeared on TV, stage, and in film, and is a professional artist. Remarried to a clinical psychologist, she founded two community theaters in San Diego County, California and served on the Steering Committee for the Greer Garson Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

In 1950, William L. McGee left the Flying M E and made a successful transition into the film, radio and TV industry. Bill and his wife Sandra are authors of The Divorce Seekers: A Photo Memoir of a Nevada Dude Wrangler

In 1950, William L. Bill and his wife Sandra are authors of The Divorce Seekers: A Photo Memoir of a Nevada Dude Wrangler. They live in Tiburon, California, but can often be spotted at Adele’s in Carson City. Visit BMCPublications. com for video clips and book details. BORIS KARLOFF Frankenstein’s Monster lived in Boulder Dam Hotel in Boulder City to establish residency for divorce in 1946.

A Photo Memoir of a Nevada Dude Wrangler. by William L. McGee, Sandra V. McGee, William W. Bliss. Published March 1, 2004 by BMC Publications. I've always had a love affair with the American cowboy.

William L. McGee reminisces about wrangling dudes at the renowned Flying M E, describes the various personalities he encountered, and briefly looks . Bibliographic Details Publisher: BMC Publications, St. Helena, CA. Publication Date. McGee reminisces about wrangling dudes at the renowned Flying M E, describes the various personalities he encountered, and briefly looks into the migratory divorce trade. Publication Date: 2004.

In his new book, Divorce Seekers: A Photo Memoir of a Nevada Dude Wrangler, co-written with his wife Sandra, Bill McGee recalls what it was like to be a dude wrangler at a 1940's upscale dude ranch in Nevada. Clientele included Hollywood celebrities, entitled Europeans, and wealthy easterners. He also details the migratory divorce trade of the era. Lenient divorce laws made Nevada the place to go for a quickie divorce.

Former Nevada dude wrangler Bill McGee reminisces about working on the exclusive Flying . 9 September ·. williammcgeebooks. is r. illiam L. McGee & Sandra V. McGee, Author Page.

"The story I'm going to tell you is about three of the best years of my life, from 1947 to 1950, when I was the head dude wrangler on the Flying M.E., the exclusive Nevada divorce ranch south of Reno that catered to wealthy Easterners, socialites and the occasional Hollywood celebrity, most seeking a six-week divorce. At age twenty-two, surrounded by all those women, I thought I'd died and gone to heaven." -Bill McGee In the 1930s to 1960s, if you wanted a quick, simple exit from marriage, Reno, Nevada was the place to go. Divorce seekers by the thousands -- Eastern socialites, movie stars and housewives -- came running to Reno to seek a six-week divorce. Reno was known worldwide as the "Divorce Capital of the World" ... and "I'm going to Reno!" became synonymous with getting "a quickie divorce" and "taking the cure".Former Nevada dude wrangler Bill McGee takes us back to the heydays of the six-week Reno divorce when Eastern ladies mixed it up out West with cowboys. The wealthy and the famous who wanted privacy from the press while they resided in Nevada for six weeks to get their "quickie divorce" often preferred to stay on a dude ranch outside of Reno ... and the Flying M.E. was the most exclusive of them all. McGee provides an up-close glimpse into daily life on the divorce ranch and how the guests passed their time. He writes about his day job ... taking guests for trail rides in the Sierras ... and his night job ... escorting guests to their favorite watering holes in Carson City and the saloons in Virginia City. The author presents a collection of stories that illustrate the different types of guests who stayed on the Flying M.E., plus the occasional Hollywood celebrity like Clark Gable and Ava Gardner. "The images -- with their smoky, black-and-white, retro allure -- are what brought the time and place alive for me so that I could bring my characters to life in my novel ... This book is a treasure if only for the photos alone."-Deb Caletti, bestselling author "The Secrets She Keeps"Part I, "Cowboyin' Memoirs" - The author's years in the 1930s and early '40s cowboying in the West.Part II, "The Famous Flying M.E. Ranch and the Changing Cast of Characters" A collection of stories about the parade of fascinating guests and how they spent their six weeks on the Flying M.E.Part III, "Gettin' Untied" - The serious business of divorce in Nevada.Part IV, "Other Leading Nevada Dude-Divorce Ranches, Circa 1930-1960" - Profiles of the Pyramid Lake, Washoe Pines and Donner Trail guest ranches. Also a profile of the TH Ranch, Nevada's first ranch to take in paying dudes in the late 1920s. 444 pp, 502 b&w photos (many never before published), plus maps, appendices, notes, bibliography, and index.
  • Mave
Great history for the Washoe Valley, NV area.
  • Ferri - My name
Fascinating bit of history and great stories.
  • Aiata
Interesting.
  • Hulis
McGee discussing a fascinating era in our social history, and I'm happy to see some sort of documentation of the period, but I felt that there were some things that detract from the enjoyment of the book.
One is the pictures. The quality of many is very poor, and very rarely is the reproduction good. I know the pictures are old, but lots of them are very hard to make out. More distracting is the fact that they are often not closely related to the text. It often seemed as though McGee found a bunch of old pictures and felt he had to use all of them regardless of their quality or relation to his text. And maybe he was given a quota of solid text pages? I suppose some of the pictures are supposed to be representative, but they're often many years (as many as 80) off from events in the text and frequently of people who don't figure in the text at all (just a bunch of folks around a generic craps table in Reno, for instance, or little tiny horseback riders off in the distance). At first, I'd read the captions trying to figure out how the pictures related to what I just read. I finally gave up and started just glancing at the caption to see IF the picture related.
More disturbing is the change in writing style from section to section. The author does best when he's doing straight reporting. He's much less successful at dialog. I doubt that anyone would remember conversations in as much as much detail as McGee puts on paper, so I'm surmising that he's creating dialog that gives the sense of the conversation rather than reporting verbatim. I hope so, anyway, because I can't imagine one individual having the misfortune of meeting so many people who talk like characters in badly written fiction.
Worse than the general dialog is the dialog in the sex scenes. Fortunately, there weren't too many of them. The writing for these changes dramatically. In addition to the poor dialog, we have to put up with all the cliches: forward-thrusting nipples, pert breasts, etc. And then there were the "kisses [that] devoured me" (note - the kisses did the devouring, not the woman; didn't know that was possible). Sometimes, things just sound plain silly: "To my male surprise"? Male surprise is different from female surprise or just surprise in general? The level of writing is embarrassing - maybe suitable for the lower ranks of cheesy paperback romances.
I like a good sex scene - if it fits in the book. While McGee's subtitle tells us this is a memoir and we expect personal stories, insights, recollections, etc., the detailed sex scenes here are out of place. I kept waiting for there to be a reason for them - maybe after this night of ecstasy the girl was going to come back and demand marriage or something? - but they seem pointless. They don't actually contribute to the narrative. Bill has sex with so-and-so. So-and-so leaves the narrative, never to reappear - but we got to hear about "sensual pleasure," "hair spread over the pillows," ambrosial fragrance, wiggling in pur joy, and so on. Ick. The scenes come across as poorly written score-keeping and have nothing to do with the ostensible premise of the book.
While all the dialog sounds like the first attempts of someone who's only read pulp fiction, at least the non-sex dialog scenes give us a sense of time, place, and events.
I was fascinated by the period and individual's portrayed in the book, but felt that McGee needed to decide at the outset whether he was writing nonfiction or a novel based on fact. He didn't mix the styles well. A skilled editor could perhaps have pointed him in a single direction and greatly improved the book.
  • Vudojar
If you love history, Clark Gable, Ava Gardner and cowboys, this book is for you. Being from Minnesota and working at Lake Tahoe in the mid-70's and now being a resident of Reno, I found this book to be a lot more than it's title indicates. Yes, the Reno area was known for being the Divorce Capital of the World, but Bill McGee takes the reader into the back mountains of the Sierras, into the world of New York socialites settling in Virginia City and into what must have been a unique place to live and work - the Flying ME Ranch. The Flying ME was located in what I think is one of the most beautiful spots in Northern Nevada today - Franktown. Even before I knew of the dude ranch, this spot between Carson City and Reno is one of beautiful ranches with white picket fences, Ponderosa Pines and mountain views second to none.

Bill and Sandra take the reader back to a time that was unique and one that will probably never exist again. The photography is wonderful and probably tells a story all by itself.

This is definitely a worthwhile read and a great coffee table book!

D. Geraghty

Reno, Nevada
  • Whitebeard
It's obvious that great care was taken in the research and collection of vintage photos and historical detail, to make this a fabulous book. What fun to go back in time to those exciting times in Reno, Nevada to learn about the time spent in Reno by these women at the dude ranches and local hot spots while waiting for their divorce to become final. Those daring gals made history and many went on to become celebrated citizens. It was a rare treat to hear about their stories from the perspective of the "dude wrangler" that was actually there.
  • WUNDERKIND
Half a century old and I've only lived one year west of the Mississippi, yet the West still seduces me! Cowboys and log cabins, railroads and dude ranches... To find a book brimming with stories and photographs of no-names and celebrities on a Nevada divorce ranch in the 1940's, that was a nostalgia trip; then to read the deeper lines of a hundred romances lost and found, that was a serious journey into the evolving role of women. If only I had a family room with a roaring fireplace, THE DIVORCE SEEKERS would be one of a half dozen books strewn generously across the coffee table. Instead, this intriguing volume invites people in my waiting area at work to reminisce, to feel, to laugh. Sometimes they look like little birds, circling, chirping and pointing toward this picture or that. You'd think they found the last worm on earth!
Jeff Watson
Washington, D.C. (USA)
The McGees have pulled together a remarkable historic and pictoral event in Nevada history. Nevada's easy divorce laws attracted the rich and famous to well known Divorce Ranches, complete with horses and swimming pools. Bill McGee was a wrangler at one of the better known "ranches". McGee introduced divorcees to horses and the spectacular Sierra Nevada Mountains. As the daughter of a former owner of one of the nearby smaller divorce sites (we didn't offer horses or a pool), I was impressed with the results of the McGee's research. Many of the photos have not been produced before; they interviewed many of the ranch's former "guests" and provided information not available earlier. This book is truly a collector's item. The Divorce Ranch years brought many new residents from the East who subsequently enriched northern Nevada's cultural community. Before the McGee's this Nevada saga was largely overlooked.