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by Dwight Boyer

Download Ships and Men of the Great Lakes eBook
ISBN:
0396074464
Author:
Dwight Boyer
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dodd Mead; 1st edition (June 1, 1977)
Pages:
208 pages
EPUB book:
1719 kb
FB2 book:
1965 kb
DJVU:
1867 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
723


Dwight Boyer (November 18, 1912 in Elyria, Ohio – October 15, 1978 in Willoughby, Ohio) was a reporter and marine historian of the . More exciting stories of the ships and men of the history of Great Lakes maritime trade.

Dwight Boyer (November 18, 1912 in Elyria, Ohio – October 15, 1978 in Willoughby, Ohio) was a reporter and marine historian of the Great Lakes. He wrote for The Blade (Toledo, Ohio) from 1944-1954, and for The Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio) from 1954-1978. Outstanding tales of an often-ignored, but extremely interesting part of the history of North America, told by the Late Dwight Boyer, who was one of the outstanding experts concerning this part of the history of the Midwest.

very well detailed book of ship wrecks and disasters on the great lakes, a very good read on a cold rainy night with a cup .

very well detailed book of ship wrecks and disasters on the great lakes, a very good read on a cold rainy night with a cup of hot tea by the fire, makes one appreciate the difficulties mariners go through on the inland waterways. According to the late reporter and marine historian, Dwight Boyer (True Tales of the Great Lakes,Great Stories of the Great Lakes, et., even the plodding ore freighters, limestone haulers, and coal barges of our great inland lakes are referred to as 'she'- whether her name is 'Frank C. Barnes' or 'James H. Reed,' 'she' could be a sweet-handling lady or a. cranky shrew with a tendency to sink at the slightest provocation.

Great stories of the Great Lakes. com User, March 6, 2006. Strange Adventures of the Great Lakes.

Ships and men of the Great Lakes spans more than a century of Great Lakes history in a series of true, thoroughly documented dramas, most of them describing the misadventures of vessels and the men who sailed them

Dwight Boyer (November 18, 1912 in Elyria, Ohio – October 15, 1978 in Willoughby, Ohio) was a reporter and marine historian of the Great Lakes.

She never made it!The . Author. Arnold was smashed to pieces on Lake Superior in 1869, when aids to navigation were practically nonexistent. Yet, 106 years later, in 1975, the gigantic ore carrier, Edmund Fitzgerald, loaded with state-of-the-art navigational equipment, also disappeared, with all hands, in Lake Superior. Years after the fact, the circumstances leading to their demise are still subject to speculation, suspicion, and heated debate.

Michigan (built 1843), ignominiously destroyed, together with a century of Great Lakes history, in 1948.

The tales in that volume and the four succeeding volumes, Ghost Ships of the Great Lakes (1968), True Tales of the Great Lakes (1971), Strange Adventures of the Great Lakes (1974), and Ships and Men of the Great Lakes (1977), range from the familiar, such as the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald (built 1958) o. Michigan (built 1843), ignominiously destroyed, together with a century of Great Lakes history, in 1948. All volumes are illustrated with photos, etchings, and maps and include bibliographies and indexes.

Books storage database. Ships and Men of the Great Lakes . Read Ships and Men of the Great Lakes by Dwight Boyer Ê eBook or Kindle ePUB. About the Author Dwight Boyer (November 18, 1912 in Elyria, Ohio – October 15, 1978 in Willoughby, Ohio) was a reporter and marine historian of the Great Lakes. Illustrated with photographs and maps, this volume tells the stories of some of the brave souls who encountered the elements, some successful.

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Ships and men of the Great Lakes spans more than a century of Great Lakes history in a series of true, thoroughly documented dramas, most of them describing the misadventures of vessels and the men who sailed them.
  • Longitude Temporary
The late marine historian, Dwight Boyer has written many of my favorite books about the Great Lakes, including Ghost Ships of the Great Lakes and Great Stories of the Great Lakes. This particular volume is one of his lesser efforts, but still interesting. Except for the last two stories, "A Stranger on the Life Raft" (the sinking of the `Daniel J. Morrell') and "A Bell Tolls Twenty-Nine for `Big Fitz'" Boyer has chosen to illuminate lesser known shipwrecks on the Lakes, such as the sad saga of the `Egg Harbor Express' and the sinking of the overloaded `Margaret Olwill.'

As always, Boyer sketches the lives of his sailors, with quick, telling details. He has included photographs of the ships in these tales, none of them objects of beauty. These are the sturdy, utilitarian carriers, tugs, and even sandsuckers that ply our fresh-water seas in search of the next cargo or job. Nevertheless, some of these ships have inspired songs and poetry: the book opens with "Ach! Wer ist John Maynard?" about a brave wheelsman who remained at his post on a burning sidewheeler, in order to steer her passengers to shore. Charles Dickens and Horatio Alger, Jr. both wrote fictional accounts of the fiery passenger ship and her courageous wheelsman. The poet, Theodor Fontane composed verses that ended with the epitaph: "Here rests John Maynard./ He held the wheel firm in his hands/ through smoke and fire./ He saved us all, he wears a crown,/ he died for us, our love his only reward."

Unfortunately, according to Boyer, the wheelsman's real name was Augustus Fuller. The small list of survivors from the burning `Erie' included "Captain Titus and Augustus Fuller's two fellow wheelsmen, Jerome McBride and James Lafferty." There was no monument erected in memory of Augustus Fuller. Nor did the authors and poets get his name right.

Such is fame on the Great Lakes. At least we had Dwight Boyer to set the record straight.

"Ships and Men of the Great Lakes" was published in 1977, two years after the sinking of the `Edmund FitzGerald' and the author has dedicated this book to the memory of her crew, especially his good friend, First Mate, John H. McCarthy. The last story attempts to reconstruct the final voyage of `Big Fitz' and includes photographs of her wreckage 530 feet beneath the surface of Lake Superior.
  • Malak
The Great Lakes have taken their share of unfortunate victims, the daily dramas and misadventures common to any seafaring venture, where the indomitability of nature presupposes the predictable. Illustrated with photographs and maps, this volume tells the stories of some of the brave souls who encountered the elements, some successful, most consigned to the anonymity of the seas, leaving behind a growing body of lore that speaks to man's continuing engagement with the elements. For more than a century these epic battles have been accounted, many before the technical advances that today's vessels enjoy. My own great-grandfather lost somewhere beneath these mighty waters, I thought to learn more of those, like him, who fought the good fight and lost, all of them ghostly neighbors in that vast, watery grave. Not a recent edition, Ships and Men of the Great Lakes was published in 1977, but time is insignificant in such matters, each tale adding to the history of the region's claim on its adventurers.

Years ago, sailors spoke of "sailing through a crack in the lake", but in truth, most are lost to the violent storms, enormous swells and dangerous shoals, the regular hazards of any Great Lakes vessel. One of the most well known disasters befell the Edmund Fitzgerald, which disappeared in Lake Superior on November 10, 1975, scant moments after her captain radioed, "I am holding my own. We are going along like an old shoe. No problems at all." On the afternoon of August 9, 1841, the Erie departed, a steamer serving freight and passenger trade, a large number of hopeful immigrants on board. A brisk wind developed rapidly into a raging sea, the craft set ablaze by turpentine, carelessly placed too close to the boilers. In what became one of the great tragedies of the century, the wooden hull was consumed, leaving only fifty survivors, none of them children. Eventually, Charles Dickens would pen his "Helmsman of Lake Eerie", inspired by the folklore of the conflagration of the Erie.

In 1908, the Soo City promised twenty-one carpeted staterooms, luxurious furnishings, stained glass windows and other trappings of wealth. Constricted by a fluctuating maritime economy, the Soo City set sail from Michigan City with a skeleton crew of fourteen men, far short of the usual twenty-eight required by law, destination New Orleans. Berthing after eleven days at Ogdensburg, New York, the vessel again set sail on November 11, but never even reached the security of New York Harbor, listed missing after ten days overdue. Detritus was later found off the westernmost point of Newfoundland, the ship a victim of a freak forty-eight hour storm, crew and passengers buried beneath roiling, mountainous seas. Chapter after chapter reveals such tales, the Sand Merchant, the City of Bangor, the Penobscot, all victims of inclement weather or fire, each decade with its own memorial to the forces of the deep. Well-researched, with an eye toward the real human tragedies involved, this is a fascinating history of the natural attrition of the Great Lakes. Luan Gaines/ 2006.
  • Phenade
The great lakes have many ship stories to tell and this is just one of the many true story books printed about the lakes and it's history. The story's are short enough to maintain intrest with out boaring you with fill in details. I recommen this read to anyone interested abour ship stories.
  • Linn
Arrived in excellent condition.
  • Perilanim
When I was a kid, I had begun to learn a bit about local history of my town. (Ashtabula, OH) A big factor that made up a great deal of the history was the shipping industry that had once flourished in the area. This book by Dwight Boyer was also read to us by one of my history teachers.
Mr. Boyer's research and writing abilities keep alive the many stories of the Men and ships that had sailed on the great lakes with great accuracy that will keep your interest.
  • Goldenfang
More exciting stories of the ships and men of the history of Great Lakes maritime trade. Outstanding tales of an often-ignored, but extremely interesting part of the history of North America, told by the Late Dwight Boyer, who was one of the outstanding experts concerning this part of the history of the Midwest.