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Download Constructing Black Education at Oberlin College: A Documentary History eBook

by Roland M. Baumann

Download Constructing Black Education at Oberlin College: A Documentary History eBook
ISBN:
0821418874
Author:
Roland M. Baumann
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ohio University Press; 1 edition (January 15, 2010)
Pages:
472 pages
EPUB book:
1663 kb
FB2 book:
1695 kb
DJVU:
1949 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
694


In 1835 Oberlin became the first institute of higher education to make a cause of racial egalitarianism when it. .

In 1835 Oberlin became the first institute of higher education to make a cause of racial egalitarianism when it decided to educate students irrespective of color. Yet the visionary college’s implementation of this admissions policy was uneven. Roland M. Baumann, emeritus archivist and professor of history at Oberlin College, is a Society of American Archivists Fellow and founding member of the Academy of Certified Archivists. He teaches for the School of Library and Information Science, Kent State University, and has authored a number of award–winning publications in archives and history including The 1858 Oberlin–Wellington Rescue: A Reappraisal.

Baumann, Roland M. (July 31, 2014). Constructing Black Education at Oberlin College: A Documentary History". Ohio University Press. See "Introduction: Oberlin - A College and a Cause" – via Google Books. "Oberlin Alumni Magazine". Oberlin College for the Alumni Association. February 3, 1912 – via Google Books. "Historic Preservation - Johnson House". "Oberlin Academy to Close".

Start by marking Constructing Black Education at Oberlin College: A.

Start by marking Constructing Black Education at Oberlin College: A Documentary History as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In Constructing Black Education at Oberlin College: A Documentary History, Roland M. Baumann presents a comprehensive documentary history of the education of African American students at Oberlin College. Following the Reconstruction era, Oberlin College mirrored the rest of society as it reduced its commitment to black students by treating them as less than equals of their white counterparts.

Yet the visionary college’s implementation of this admissions policy was uneven.

Yet the visionary college's implementation of this admissions policy was uneven.

In Constructing Black Education at Oberlin College: A Documentary History, Roland M. By the middle of the twentieth century, black and white student activists partially reclaimed the Oberlin legacy by refusing to be defined by race.

The college and community thrived on progressive causes and social justice. Among Oberlin’s earliest graduates were women and black people

The college and community thrived on progressive causes and social justice. Among Oberlin’s earliest graduates were women and black people. While Oberlin was coeducational from its founding in 1833, the college regularly admitted black students beginning in 1835, after trustee and abolitionist, the Rev. John Keep, cast the deciding vote to allow them entry. Women were not admitted to the baccalaureate program, which granted bachelor’s degrees, until 1837.

Diverse talks with Baumann about his book, which . Constructing Black Education at Oberlin College: A Documentary History (Nonfiction work).

Diverse talks with Baumann about his book, which chronicles a story of fractured progress and unleashes the voices of African-American students and alumni who celebrate and chastise the educational experience that transformed their fives. I'm hoping that in covering 175 years of Oberlin's Black education legacy, it will compel others to look at Oberlin in the 21st century. Related books and articles.

Download PDF book format. African Americans Education Ohio Oberlin History 19th century History 20th century College integration. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Constructing Black education at Oberlin College : a documentary history Roland M. Baumann. Book's title: Constructing Black education at Oberlin College : a documentary history Roland M. Download now Constructing Black education at Oberlin College : a documentary history Roland M. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Oberlin Academy Preparatory School, also known as Oberlin Academy but originally Oberlin Institute and . Baumann, Roland M. Constructing Black Education at Oberlin College: A Documentary History. Ohio University Press

Oberlin Academy Preparatory School, also known as Oberlin Academy but originally Oberlin Institute and then Preparatory Department of Oberlin College, was a private preparatory school in Oberlin, Ohio which operated from 1833 until 1916. It opened as Oberlin Collegiate Institute which became Oberlin College in 1850. The secondary school serving local and boarding students continued as a department of the college. See "Introduction: Oberlin - A College and a Cause".

In 1835 Oberlin became the first institute of higher education to make a cause of racial egalitarianism when it decided to educate students “irrespective of color.” Yet the visionary college’s implementation of this admissions policy was uneven. In Constructing Black Education at Oberlin College: A Documentary History, Roland M. Baumann presents a comprehensive documentary history of the education of African American students at Oberlin College.Following the Reconstruction era, Oberlin College mirrored the rest of society as it reduced its commitment to black students by treating them as less than equals of their white counterparts. By the middle of the twentieth century, black and white student activists partially reclaimed the Oberlin legacy by refusing to be defined by race. Generations of Oberlin students, plus a minority of faculty and staff, rekindled the college’s commitment to racial equality by 1970. In time, black separatism in its many forms replaced the integrationist ethic on campus as African Americans sought to chart their own destiny and advance curricular change.Oberlin’s is not a story of unbroken progress, but rather of irony, of contradictions and integrity, of myth and reality, and of imperfections. Baumann takes readers directly to the original sources by including thirty complete documents from the Oberlin College Archives. This richly illustrated volume is an important contribution to the college’s 175th anniversary celebration of its distinguished history, for it convincinglydocuments how Oberlin wrestled over the meaning of race and the destiny of black people in American society.