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Download Imagined Homes: Soviet German Immigrants During the Cold War (Studies in Immigration and Culture) eBook

by Hans Werner

Download Imagined Homes: Soviet German Immigrants During the Cold War (Studies in Immigration and Culture) eBook
ISBN:
0887557015
Author:
Hans Werner
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Manitoba Press (November 20, 2007)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1133 kb
FB2 book:
1471 kb
DJVU:
1218 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
657


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Imagined Homes: Soviet German Immigrants in Two Cities is a study of the social and cultural integration of two migrations of German speakers from Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union to Winnipeg, Canada in the late 1940s, and Bielefeld, Germany in the 1970s. Employing a cross-national comparative framework, Hans Werner reveals that the imagined trajectory of immigrant lives influenced the process of integration into a new urban environment.

Электронная книга "Imagined Homes: Soviet German Immigrants in Two Cities", Hans Werner. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Imagined Homes: Soviet German Immigrants in Two Cities" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Studies in Immigration and Culture Series. This is, in a nutshell, the main argument posited in Hans Werner’s Imagined Homes. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press, 2007. Immigrants’ expectations about the host country determine the degree of their integration into their new environment. The book follows the journey of two German-speaking groups from the Soviet Union into the West and compares their social and cultural integration in post-World War II Bielefeld, Germany, and Winnipeg, Canada.

The fifteen Soviet socialist republics that made up the Soviet Union all became independent after the breakup of the . Despite a halt in immigration during World War I, another . million immigrants came during the following decade.

The fifteen Soviet socialist republics that made up the Soviet Union all became independent after the breakup of the union in 1991. Ukrainian immigration to the United States has been significant since the 1880’s. At that time most Ukrainian immigrants came from the provinces of Galicia and Bukovina in the eastern reaches of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

What effect did the Cold War conflict have on US immigration policy? .

What effect did the Cold War conflict have on US immigration policy? In the immediate aftermath of World War II, the national immigration quotas established in the Johnson-Reed Act of 1924 remained in effect. The act allowed visas for up to 2,000 immigrants of Chinese origin in the wake of the 1949 Communist victory in the Chinese Civil War. It expired in 1956. The McCarran-Walter Immigration and Naturalization Act eliminated race as a barrier to naturalization, but retained the national origins formula of 1924.

1 Imagined Homes Soviet German Immigrants in Two Cities Hans Werner. In Western culture, it was a time of a levelling of hierarchies, the rise. 2 Mennonite Women in Canada A History Marlene Epp. 3 Sounds of Ethnicity Listening to German North America, 1850–1914 Barbara Lorenzkowski. Introduction 7. of political democracy, and the blurring of boundaries between sacred and profane spaces in contemporary religion. 4 In Stuartburn, two societies were about to collide; the effects of that collision would be mediated largely by geographic factors.

PDF The broad outlines of US immigration policy date back to the early . Cold War allows me to study mobilization as a byproduct of geopolitics.

PDF The broad outlines of US immigration policy date back to the early Cold War. One piece of this system is a screening process initially designed t. .Union and the outbreak of the Cold War, policymakers in Washington created a new. immigration system, which subjected migrants to a screening process to ensure that. communist agents from East-Central Europe did not infiltrate the country.

During this time North-Western European governments increasingly . The end of the Cold War, as well as the wars in the former Yugoslavia led to new flows of asylum seekers to Western Europe.

During this time North-Western European governments increasingly restricted migration, and migrants’ main route of entrance became family reunification and family formation. Furthermore, asylum applications increased.

The Soviet Union used its relationship with Europe to gain economic cooperation with the Arab world during the Cold War and its influence in the Middle East by inciting proxy conflicts between the Arab states and their Jewish neighbors. The superpowers interacted with proxy combatants, which factored into the Soviet Union's omission from the Camp David Accords

Imagined Homes: Soviet German Immigrants in Two Cities is a study of the social and cultural integration of two migrations of German speakers from Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union to Winnipeg, Canada in the late 1940s, and Bielefeld, Germany in the 1970s. Employing a cross-national comparative framework, Hans Werner reveals that the imagined trajectory of immigrant lives influenced the process of integration into a new urban environment. Winnipeg’s migrants chose a receiving society where they knew they would again be a minority group in a foreign country, while Bielefeld’s newcomers believed they were “going home” and were unprepared for the conflict between their imagined homeland and the realities of post-war Germany. Werner also shows that differences in the way the two receiving societies perceived immigrants, and the degree to which secularization and the sexual and media revolutions influenced these perceptions in the two cities, were crucially important in the immigrant experience.