almediah.fr
» » Grant's Lieutenants: From Chattanooga to Appomatox (Modern War Studies)

Download Grant's Lieutenants: From Chattanooga to Appomatox (Modern War Studies) eBook

by Steven E. Woodworth

Download Grant's Lieutenants: From Chattanooga to Appomatox (Modern War Studies) eBook
ISBN:
070061589X
Author:
Steven E. Woodworth
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
University Press of Kansas; First Edition edition (June 19, 2008)
Pages:
272 pages
EPUB book:
1149 kb
FB2 book:
1187 kb
DJVU:
1523 kb
Other formats
azw txt lrf docx
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
308


Combined with Grant's Lieutenants, Vol 1, the book provides a good introduction to the war under Grant.

Combined with Grant's Lieutenants, Vol 1, the book provides a good introduction to the war under Grant. 2 people found this helpful. Picking up from where the first volume, "From Cairo to Vicksburg," left off, the second volume, "From Chattanooga to Appomattox," follows Ulysses S. Grant as he moves from the Western theater of operations to the Eastern theater, from his relief of the besieged city of Chattanooga Tennessee to accepting the surrender of Robert E. Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox.

Grant's Lieutenants book. Like its companion volume, Grant's Lieutenants: From Chattanooga to Appomattox is an essential touchstone for Civil War scholars and aficionados

Grant's Lieutenants book. A companion to Grant's Lieutenants: From Cairo to Vicksburg, this new. Like its companion volume, Grant's Lieutenants: From Chattanooga to Appomattox is an essential touchstone for Civil War scholars and aficionados. It offers new and profound insights into the command relationships that fundamentally shaped both the conduct of the war and its final outcome.

Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2008 The book’s nine chapters highlight Grant’s professional and personal relationships with his Union colleagues.

Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2008. Woodworth’s Grant’s Lieutenant’s From Chattanooga To Appomattox is a collection of essays written by distinguished scholars in the field that illustrate the ways Grant’s lieutenants contributed to or challenged their commander’s success and developments as a general. The book’s nine chapters highlight Grant’s professional and personal relationships with his Union colleagues.

Book's title: Grant's lieutenants. Library of Congress Control Number: 2008015338. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 9780700615896 (cloth : alk. paper). International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 070061589X (cloth : alk.

Steven E. Woodworth (born January 28, 1961) is an American historian specializing in studies of the American Civil War. He has written numerous books concerning the Civil Wa. . He has written numerous books concerning the Civil War, and as a professor has taught classes on the Civil War, the Reconstruction Era, and military history. Steven E. Woodworth was born in Ohio on January 28, 1961 and spent most his early life in Illinois. He graduated from Southern Illinois University in 1982 with a .

From Chattanooga to Appomatox. Like its companion volume, Grant's Lieutenants: From Chattanooga to Appomattox is an essential touchstone for Civil War scholars and aficionados

From Chattanooga to Appomatox. Woodworth is professor of history at Texas Christian University.

Commanders who serve on the losing side of a battle, campaign, or war are often harshly viewed by posterity. Labeled as mere "losers," they go unrecognized for their very real abilities and achievements in other engagements. The writers in this volume challenge such simplistic notions. By looking more closely at Civil War generals who have borne the stigma of failure, these authors reject the reductionist view that significant defeats were due simply to poor generalship.

Find nearly any book by Steven E. Woodworth (page 2). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 . Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Coauthors & Alternates. Learn More at LibraryThing.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Steven E Woodworth books online. Davis and Lee at War. Woodworth. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

A companion to Grant's Lieutenants: From Cairo to Vicksburg, this new volume assesses Union generalship during the final two years of the Civil War. Steven Woodworth, one of the war's premier historians, is joined by a team of distinguished scholars—Mark Grimsley, John Marszalek, and Earl Hess, among others—who critique Ulysses S. Grant's commanders in terms of both their working relationship with their general-in-chief and their actual performances.The book covers well-known Union field generals like William T. Sherman, George Thomas, George Meade, and Philip Sheridan, as well as the less-prominent Franz Sigel, Horatio Wright, Edward Ord, and Benjamin Butler. In addition, it includes an iconoclastic look at Grant's former superior and wartime chief of staff Henry W. Halleck, focusing on his wise counsel concerning Washington politics, the qualities of various subordinates, and the strategic environment. Each of these probing essays emphasizes the character and accomplishments of a particular general and shows how his relationship with Grant either helped or hindered the Union cause. The contributors highlight the ways Grant's lieutenants contributed to or challenged their commander's own success and development as a general. In addition to revisiting Grant's key collaboration with Sherman, the essays illuminate the hostile relationship between Grant and Thomas, commander of the Army of the Cumberland; Grant's almost daily contact with "Old Snapping Turtle" Meade, whose expertise relieved Grant of the close tactical direction of the Army of the Potomac; and the development of a highly successful command partnership between Grant and Sheridan, his new commander of the Army of the Shenandoah. Readers will also learn how Grant handled the relative incompetence of his less sterling leaders—perhaps failing to give Butler adequate direction and overlooking Ord's suspect political views in light of their long relationship.Like its companion volume, Grant's Lieutenants: From Chattanooga to Appomattox is an essential touchstone for Civil War scholars and aficionados. It offers new and profound insights into the command relationships that fundamentally shaped both the conduct of the war and its final outcome.
  • Der Bat
Good collection of essays on Grant's subordinates. Interesting interpretation of O.C. Ord's career, of which I knew nothing. Nature of the writing precluded much in depth analysis or tactical detail of the various officers' battles/operations. Combined with Grant's Lieutenants, Vol 1, the book provides a good introduction to the war under Grant.
  • Ohatollia
If eight people went to a theatrical event staged in the round, depending on where they were seated, you may have eight slightly different descriptions of the same show that each just witnessed. By assembling each of these descriptions and forming them into a single narrative one is able to get a more complete, detailed and nuanced account of the show they have just seen.

As the editor of "Grant's Lieutenants," Steven E. Woodworth has done something very much similar. Picking up from where the first volume, "From Cairo to Vicksburg," left off, the second volume, "From Chattanooga to Appomattox," follows Ulysses S. Grant as he moves from the Western theater of operations to the Eastern theater, from his relief of the besieged city of Chattanooga Tennessee to accepting the surrender of Robert E. Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Courthouse.

As with the first volume, this book is a collection of essays written by prominent historians. Each essay is a mini-biography, of one of Grant's subordinates and his relationship with them. Those of featured in the book, are William T. Sherman (making a 2nd appearance), George H. Thomas, George G. Meade, Franz Sigel, Benjamin F. Butler, David Hunter Lew Wallis, Horatio Wright, Philip H. Sheridan, Edward O. C. Ord and Henry Halleck. And the historians writing about them are John F. Marszaleck, Steven E. Woodworth, Ethan S. Rafuse, Earl J. Hess, Mark Grimsley, Benjamin F. Cooling, Steven E. Nash, and William B Feis.

Neither in the first, nor in the second volume, is there an essay dedicated to Ulysses S. Grant alone. Neither is there is no final essay tying all of the essays together. Mr. Woodworth has left his readers to put all the narrative pieces together and draw their own conclusions about the evolution of Grant's leadership style. Taken together both volumes form a biography in the round.
  • Cordann
Doing a book of essays is challenging. Each essay needs to contribute to a central theme while being able to standalone. The essayists bring different perspectives and styles that need to mesh or the result is a mess. Weaving this into a recognizable intelligent book that contributes to the readers understanding of the main subject is no small accomplishment. Steven E. Woodworth once again demonstrates his ability to do just that. This is the second book of essays on Grant's Lieutenants he has edited. This book benefits from star power covering the campaigns where Grant deals with major Civil War figures. While covering Thomas, Meade, Halleck, Sheridan & Sherman, we see a number of obscure generals too. This approach gives us a balanced look what Grant faced and how he managed to handle this very mixed group of men.
Woodworth's essay on George H. Thomas is one of the best things written about Thomas. In 24 pages, he provides a balanced portrait and covers the difficulties of his relationship with Grant. The considerable Thomas fan club will find much here to be upset over but this is one of the fairest looks at the man I have seen.
Ethan S. Rafuse looks at George G. Meade in the longest essay in the book. This is the critical relationship during this period and gets the required space. This excellent piece captures the contentious, friendly and often difficult relationship. This is very factual, devoid of sentiment or blame detailing the command structure that wins the war in Virginia.
Earl J. Hess covers the always-difficult Franz Sigel and Grant's immersion in ethnic politics. Benjamin Franklin Cooling provides a different perspective on Jubal Early's 1864 Raid and the North's response looking at Hunter, Wallace and Wright. This leads us into Steven E. Nash's excellent look at Philip H. Sheridan. Grant was not always right about people and William B. Feis gives us an example of this with Edward O. C. Ord.
Mark Grimsley contributes two excellent views given Benjamin F. Butler he made the case that Henry W. Halleck had to be included. After getting them to agree, he got the assignment to write it. The happy result is two excellent essays that fairly cover these difficult generals.
You will not find a detailed in-depth analysis in 20-pages. It is not possible to produce something readable in that short a space. What you have is an excellent overview of these men. While not highly detailed, nothing important is omitted and many secondary items are considered. Each author is a respected historian with deep knowledge of the subject and excellent writing skills. The result is an enjoyable, informative read that completes the series on a high note.