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Download A Portion of the People: Three Hundred Years of Southern Jewish Life eBook

by McKissick Museum,Theodore Rosengarten,Dale Rosengarten

Download A Portion of the People: Three Hundred Years of Southern Jewish Life eBook
ISBN:
1570034451
Author:
McKissick Museum,Theodore Rosengarten,Dale Rosengarten
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of South Carolina Press; First Edition edition (September 2002)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1620 kb
FB2 book:
1595 kb
DJVU:
1293 kb
Other formats
azw doc mbr mobi
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
224


When Dale and Theodore Rosengarten sent out the invitations to their .

When Dale and Theodore Rosengarten sent out the invitations to their son’s bar mitzvah in 1993, their northern friends and family members barely concealed their surprise, according to Dale (Rosen) ’69, P. Photographs courtesy of the McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina. The show’s title and focus come from a letter sent to then-U.

Grass Roots: African Origins of an American Art, Authors Dale Rosengarten, Theodore Rosengarten, Enid Schildkrout, Judith Ann Carney, Museum for African Art, 2008, ISBN 978-45802-50-1. International Who's Who of Authors and Writers 2004 (Psychology Press, 2003: ISBN 1-85743-179-0), p. 479. ^ "National Book Awards – 1975". National Book Foundation.

A Portion Of The People book. A Portion Of The People: Three Hundred Years Of Southern Jewish Life. A photographic essay by Bill Aron, who has documented Jewish.

Theodore Rosengarten of College of Charleston, Charleston C of C with .

Theodore Rosengarten of College of Charleston, Charleston C of C with expertise in History of Religion.

In the year 1800, South Carolina was home to more Jews than any other place in North America. The record of a landmark exhibition that will change the way people think about Jewish history and American history, A Portion of the People: Three Hundred Years of Southern Jewish Life presents a remarkable group of objects and a provocative investigation of the people and circumstances that produced them. Retrieved 2012-03-09.

A Portion of the People: Three Hundred Years of Southern Jewish .

A Portion of the People: Three Hundred Years of Southern Jewish Life" chronicles the long, eventful saga of Jews in the American South-anticipating the 350th anniversary of Jews in America in 2004. Becoming "a portion of the people" also meant that southern Jews might assimilate into the mainstream and marry out of Judaism altogether. Indeed, few descendants of Carolina's first families are still Jewish, though most are proud of their Jewish lineage. In September 2003, it moves to the Levine Museum of the New South in Charlotte, North Carolina-not a Jewish museum, but named for a major Jewish contributor.

A Portion of the People Three Hundred Years of Southern Jewish Life . The book and exhibition culminate a seven-year collaboration by the Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina, the McKissick Museum of the University of South Carolina, and the College of Charleston.

Theodore Rosengarten is an independent historian whose work focuses on the lives .

Theodore Rosengarten is an independent historian whose work focuses on the lives of slaves and freedmen in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Rosengarten teaches in the Jewish Studies Program and the Department of History at the College of Charleston.

Theodore Rosengarten is an independent historian whose work focuses on the lives of slaves and freedmen in. .

In the year 1800, South Carolina was home to more Jews than any other place in North America. As old as the province of Carolina itself, the Jewish presence has been a vital but little-examined element in the growth of South Carolina's cities and towns, in the economy of slavery and post-slavery society and in the creation of American Jewish religious identity.The record of a landmark exhibition that will change the way people think about Jewish history and American history, A Portion of the People: Three Hundred Years of Southern Jewish Life presents a remarkable group of objects and a provocative investigation of the people and circumstances that produced them. The book and exhibition culminate a seven-year collaboration by the Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina, McKissick Museum of the University of South Carolina, and the College of Charleston. A Portion of the People is an important addition to southern arts and letters.
  • Llanonte
Beautiful book co-edited by historian Theodore Rosengarten who has given us other glimpses of real life in the recent past with All God's Dangers and Tombee. Dale Rosengarten, founding director of the Jewish Heritage Collection at the College of Charleston Rosengarten, is the editor who spent 7 years researching the presence, influence, and lives of the men and women who made Charleston the Jewish Cultural Center of the United States. The book is a hardcover catalog for the 2003 NY exhibition at the Center for Jewish history. It includes many full color photographs not just of religious objects but of portraits and costumes and household objects showing the ways in which Jewish immigrants -- beginning in the 17th century -- became "a portion of the people" in the American South.
  • Marilace
Great resource for Yankee transplants to South Carolina. Answers the questions of who, what, where and why the various Jewish settler waves made a happy home here -- with the Jews of Charleston outnumbering their brethren in New York in the early days. The end of the Civil War brought cataclysmic changes to Southern society, some not always good for the Jews.
  • Jark
Excellent the great love book to me.
  • HeonIc
At important times in early American history, the largest and most important Jewish Community was in Charleston, South Carolina. Unlike many parts of the world where Jews were then treated as a dispised or distrusted minority, relegated to the fringes of community life, these Jews (like their neighbors in Georgia) were an integral and valued element in the colony form its earliest time. The were truly "a portion of the people." Here Jews blended in and prospered and Judaism flourished. The first Jew was elected to a legislature in modern times in the Revolutionary War period there. Jews fought along side their fellow citizens as colonists, in the Revolutionary War, and in the Civil War. A number of nationally prominent Jewish figures (including one of the first two Jewish Senators, the first Jew nominated to the US Supreme Court, prominent business men and cabinet officials) trace their heritage to this part of the South.
And the authors tell of the cradle of Reform Judaism in Charleston where the first prayer book and hymnal were written. The reforms that were to make Reform Judaism the largest denomination, such as services in English, an important role for women, and full integration into the community, were established there. Beth Elohim, the oldest synagogue in continuous use in America, is located here.
The authors have put together a good set of photographs of people and places and interesting text on this little known chapter of American and Jewish history.
  • Grinin
Dale Rosengarten spent hundreds of hours working on a marvelous exhibit. If you were fortunate enough to have seen the exhibit in Charleston, New York, Columbia or Charlotte, I know you'll agree that it was superb and this book will keep your memory fresh. If you didn't have the chance to see the exhibit and you're interested in the history of Jews in America then this is the book from an exhibit that has sparked a new era of interest by historians to rediscover southern Jewish life from the mid 18th century to the present.