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Download Talk with You Like a Woman: African American Women, Justice, and Reform in New York, 1890-1935 (Gender and American Culture) eBook

by Cheryl D. Hicks

Download Talk with You Like a Woman: African American Women, Justice, and Reform in New York, 1890-1935 (Gender and American Culture) eBook
ISBN:
0807871621
Author:
Cheryl D. Hicks
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (December 13, 2010)
Pages:
392 pages
EPUB book:
1614 kb
FB2 book:
1362 kb
DJVU:
1839 kb
Other formats
lit mbr lrf docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
268


With this book, Cheryl Hicks brings to light the voices and viewpoints of black working-class women, especially southern migrants, who were the . Series: Gender and American Culture. Published by: University of North Carolina Press.

With this book, Cheryl Hicks brings to light the voices and viewpoints of black working-class women, especially southern migrants, who were the subjects of urba. DOI: 1. 149/9780807882320 hicks. 5149/9780807882320 hicks.

A masterly study of black women, reform, and the criminal justice system. Journal of American History. An excellent, often riveting series of portraits of working-class black women in New York City whose lives intersect with social reform, city policing, the first sexual revolution, and the great migration of southern African Americans to the North. Hicks provides an ambitious and important corrective to the scant treatment of these women by academic historians. Patricia Schechter, Portland State University.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Talk with You Like a Woman: African . This creative, cross-disciplinary book will make significant contributions to African American and women's history, as well as sociology and legal studies.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Talk with You Like a Woman: African American Women, Justice, and Reform in New York, 1890-1935 (Gender and American Culture). Tera Hunter, author of To 'Joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women's Lives and Labors after the Civil War.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Talk with You Like a Woman: African American Women, Justice, and Reform in New York, 1890-1935 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Seri: Gender and American culture. Gender & American culture. çindekiler: To live a fuller and freer life : black women migrants' expectations and New York's urban realities, 1890-1927 - The only one that would be interested in me : police brutality, black women's protection, and the New York Race Riot of 1900 - I want to save these girls : single black women and their protectors, 1895-1911 - Colored.

With this book, Cheryl Hicks brings to light the voices and viewpoints of black working-class women . This is business I want to talk with you like a woman. Lucy Cox, letter to superintendent of Bedford reformatory, 1924.

With this book, Cheryl Hicks brings to light the voices and viewpoints of black working-class women, especially southern migrants, who were the subjects of urban and penal reform in early twentieth-century New York. Hicks compares the ideals of racial uplift and reform programs of middle-class white and black activists to the experiences and perspectives of those whom they sought to protect and, often, control.

Since the proliferation of scholarship on African American women’s reform efforts, the notion of respectability .

Since the proliferation of scholarship on African American women’s reform efforts, the notion of respectability has come to shape how African American women sought to present themselves to the world. Cheryl D. Hicks expands both the reach of respectability and its definition in Talk with You Like A Woman: African American Women, Justice, and Reform in New York, 1890-1935.

Gender-related violence and international criminal law and justice. This 1946 novel dramatizes the difference between law and justice as experienced by a young black woman in Harlem. What type of file do you want? RIS. BibTeX.

Cheryl D. Hicks, Talk With You Like a Woman: African American Women, Justice, and Reform in New York, 1890–1935, Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2010.

Volume 30, Issue 1. February 2012, pp. 285-286. Gwen Hoerr Jordan (a1).

With this book, Cheryl Hicks brings to light the voices and viewpoints of black working-class women, especially southern migrants, who were the subjects of urban and penal reform in early-twentieth-century New York. Hicks compares the ideals of racial uplift and reform programs of middle-class white and black activists to the experiences and perspectives of those whom they sought to protect and, often, control. In need of support as they navigated the discriminatory labor and housing markets and contended with poverty, maternity, and domestic violence, black women instead found themselves subject to hostility from black leaders, urban reformers, and the police. Still, these black working-class women struggled to uphold their own standards of respectable womanhood. Through their actions as well as their words, they challenged prevailing views regarding black women and morality in urban America. Drawing on extensive archival research, Hicks explores the complexities of black working-class women's lives and illuminates the impact of racism and sexism on early-twentieth-century urban reform and criminal justice initiatives.