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Download Open: Inside the Ropes at Bethpage Black eBook

by John Feinstein

Download Open: Inside the Ropes at Bethpage Black eBook
ISBN:
0316778524
Author:
John Feinstein
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Back Bay Books (April 12, 2004)
Pages:
384 pages
EPUB book:
1361 kb
FB2 book:
1487 kb
DJVU:
1181 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
337


This book is about the 2002 . Open Golf Championship at the Bethpage Black Golf Course, a New York State Park course on Long Island. The subtitle, "Inside the Ropes at Bethpage Black," is used here as a figure of speech, meaning "behind the scenes.

This book is about the 2002 . "Inside the ropes" is normally used in the context of a professional golf tournament to refer to the actual playing area itself - spectators are separated from the golfers, caddies, officials, and other chosen few by thin ropes that tell the spectators how close they can get to the action.

With Open, John Feinstein goes behind the scenes to tell for the first time the full story of how the 2002 . Open at Bethpage Black was the first time in history that golf's greatest championship had been held at a true public course. Open Championship came into being-how a public course was transformed into one of the most difficult and surprising in the tournament's history, and how the greatest golfers in the world rose to its almost insurmountable challenges. The Black course at the public golf club in Bethpage, New York, has long had a mythic status among golfers.

The book is less inside the ropes at Bethpage Black than it is inside the USGA trailer outside the clubhouse before the tournament starts. I remember the tournament well, in particular Sergio Garcia’s incessant wiggle. In fact I thought Feinstein took it a bit easy on Garcia.

John Feinstein, whom the Boston Globe calls 'the best writer of sports books in America today, captures the fiercest four days in golf as no. .Feinstein Goes Low at Bethpage Black. com User, July 9, 2003.

John Feinstein, whom the Boston Globe calls 'the best writer of sports books in America today, captures the fiercest four days in golf as no other writer could. Having read "A Good Walk Spoiled" and "The Majors" I surmised that John Feinstein had exhausted his insights on the subject of golf. However, "The Open" showed me that Feinstein can go low whenever he writes about golf. Somehow, he is able to provide information that make events come alive and keep the pages turning.

John Feinstein, whom the Boston Globe calls 'the best writer of sports books in America today,' captures the fiercest four days in golf as no other writer could. Open as it was played, for the first time in history, on a true public golf course-and one of the most challenging courses in the country (only one player, Tiger Woods, finished under par at Bethpage Black)-Feinstein lifts the mystery shrouding golf's most celebrated event and takes the reader through every shot, every trap, every thorny.

Bethpage Black also hosted the 2009 . Open, which was won by Lucas Glover. Feinstein, John (2004). Open: Inside the Ropes at Bethpage Black. Prior to 2002, all . Opens had been staged at private golf or country clubs or at privately owned resorts that, while open to the public, were very expensive for the public to play, with greens fees of several hundred dollars per round. Back Bay. ISBN 9780316778527.

Open: Inside the Ropes at Bethpage Black. The Punch: One Night, Two Lives, and the Fight That Changed Basketball Forever. A Good Walk Spoiled: Days and Nights on the PGA Tour. Published in the United States by Doubleday, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, New York, and distributed in Canada by Random House of Canada, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Lt. Toronto. Open at Bethpage Black, in Bethpage, New York, was the first time in history that golf's greatest championship has been help at a true public golf course

With Open, John Feinstein goes behind the scenes to tell for the first time the full story of how the 2002 . Open at Bethpage Black, in Bethpage, New York, was the first time in history that golf's greatest championship has been help at a true public golf course. Open is the full drama of that championship, from the moment that officials first considered holding it there until the last putt rolled in at dusk on Sunday. Along the way John Feinstein reveals the full glory of golf as it's never been explored before.

John Feinstein, whom the Boston Globe calls 'the best writer of sports books in America today,' captures the fiercest four days in golf as no other writer could. Chronicling the U.S. Open as it was played, for the first time in history, on a true public golf course-and one of the most challenging courses in the country (only one player, Tiger Woods, finished under par at Bethpage Black)-Feinstein lifts the mystery shrouding golf's most celebrated event and takes the reader through every shot, every trap, every thorny hole, and every bitter rivalry of golf's greatest tournament.
  • Dammy
Typical Feinstein ("A Season on the Brink" excepted). Quick, gossipy, superficial, fawning, etc., etc. This book is about the 2002 U.S. Open Golf Championship at the Bethpage Black Golf Course, a New York State Park course on Long Island. The subtitle, "Inside the Ropes at Bethpage Black," is used here as a figure of speech, meaning "behind the scenes." ("Inside the ropes" is normally used in the context of a professional golf tournament to refer to the actual playing area itself -- spectators are separated from the golfers, caddies, officials, and other chosen few by thin ropes that tell the spectators how close they can get to the action.) Feinstein's purpose is to give the reader a look at the unfolding of a golf tournament from its conception to its completion. We see U.S Golf Association (the organization that conducts the tournament) leaders in action and learn something about the logistics of putting on a golf tournament (e.g., 4,850 people willing to volunteer their time so that the professional golfers and U.S.G.A. can have a huge payday), about random qualifiers and random competitors, and about the resurrection of the Black golf course. Yet the book does not fulfill its promise. My guess is that Feinstein's indebted to too many golf people for both his past and anticipated future lifestyle to offer the kind of critical insights and analysis I had hoped for.
  • Vizil
John Feinstein finds a lot more interesting things about the preparations for the 2002 U.S. Open than I would. He writes about parking pressures and vendor pilfering the way Cornelius Ryan wrote about D-Day.

Those expecting a play-by-play on the golf played during those four days in June, which saw Tiger Woods break away the first day and never look back, may be disappointed. Even when the book's narrative finally reaches the event itself, after some 260 pages, the focus remains on the behind-the-scenes organizers, the USGA, NBC, and state officials. It's a unique situation, Feinstein reminds us, to have used a municipal course to host the U.S. Open, but maybe it's not worth writing a book about.

That said, Feinstein's book is an interesting read, especially for those who care about things like event management, sports broadcasting, or professional golf. As an author, Feinstein is much more engaged than he was when he wrote "The Majors," his style coming up to that of his classic "A Good Walk Spoiled."
Some of his wit is back in evidence. When a volunteer realizes Tiger used the Porta-John he helped set up, he calls a friend to share the good news. "Yes, Woods thrilled people in many different ways," Feinstein concludes.

I also liked the fact he doesn't hold back with the players, something I noticed and minded with "The Majors" after his no-holds-barred approach in "Good Walk Spoiled." Woods still won't shake a TV reporter's hand 18 months after that reporter said Woods was in a "slump." Sergio Garcia has his star moments, while Jeff Maggert comes across as totally unpleasant. At least Feinstein whipping boy John Daly's on his best behavior this time around.

The portraits of the organizers and staff that center this book are smoother, and maybe Feinstein finds more of interest about them than you will. It's an interesting tack to take, though, writing not about the game's stars but those who help to make such marquee events happen. Feinstein is in uncharted territory here, and maybe reclaiming some lost ground as golf's most original working writer.

That said, "The Open" is still a bore in parts, and lacks a strategic or historical overview of what makes Bethpage's Black Course so special. What did course designer A.W. Tillinghast do with the track that was so unique, and how did it preserve that notoriety over the decades as an overused Long Island muni? There's a splendid tale about golf course architecture waiting to get out here that never quite does.

All the same, "The Open" is good for what it is, an appreciation of a very underappreciated aspect of sport. Too bad it isn't a little more interesting, but for those who care (and there are many, given golf's popularity), it will probably be worth your while to check it out.
  • Arabella V.
One of the more disappointing books by John Feinstein. He acts like the people putting on the 2002 U.S. Open were working on a cure for cancer. But seriously if the people described have all the abilities that Feinstein accredits them with, why aren't they doing something more meaningful than putting on a Golf Tournament. ALSO since I am a Huge Tiger Woods fan the usual Feinstein bashing of Tiger is not appreciated. One thing that surprised me is that NBC dictates pairings and starting times. If David Fay has all the integrity that Feinstein gives him credit for, he should not allow NBC to be so selective.
Also, I remeber watching this event on the tube. And Feinstein does not capture the enthusiasm that New Yorkers displayed for Phil Mickelson. The Book does not mention that he was called "The Mick."
The only question was how low to rate this book. Though unscientific 3 stars "feels" right.
  • Goldenfang
My hisband enjoyed this book. He finished it within days of receiving it..
  • Blackbeard
If you are looking for a stroke by stroke description of the Open Championship, look elsewhere. As others have pointed out, this is a story about running an Open, not playing in an Open (perhaps the subtitle is a bit misleading).
If you have any interest in the topic, it's a pretty good book. Feinstein's style is pleasant and interesting and he does a nice job describing the myriad of tasks and personnel required to set up an Open. This is not as good a book as The Majors, but I enjoyed it as much as A Good Walk.
  • Bloodfire
I highly recommend this book. It is a great, behind-the-scenes look at how much work and planning goes into each Open Championship. It's exceptionally well-written, and easy to understand and follow. And reading it on my Kindle made the experience that much more enjoyable.
  • Hiylchis
I'm not a huge fan of this book. I made my way thought it, but it was a bit of a slog. The book is more about the behind the scenes aspects of the Open than the actual Open itself or the professional golfers plying their skills and the competition itself. As such, you'd really have to have an interest in the minutia of event planning to enjoy this read.
Great look at producing the U.S. Open .