almediah.fr
» » This Hallowed Ground: The Story of the Union Side of the Civil War (Wordsworth Military Library)

Download This Hallowed Ground: The Story of the Union Side of the Civil War (Wordsworth Military Library) eBook

by Bruce Catton

Download This Hallowed Ground: The Story of the Union Side of the Civil War (Wordsworth Military Library) eBook
ISBN:
1853266965
Author:
Bruce Catton
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Wordsworth Editions Ltd (December 1, 1998)
Pages:
437 pages
EPUB book:
1778 kb
FB2 book:
1466 kb
DJVU:
1363 kb
Other formats
lrf mbr doc azw
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
464


This Hallowed Ground book. This Hallowed Ground deals with the entire scope of the Civil War from the months of unrest and hysteria that led to Fort Sumter to the days of tragedy and hope that followed Appomattox.

This Hallowed Ground book.

This history of the American Civil War chronicles the entire war to preserve .

This history of the American Civil War chronicles the entire war to preserve the Union - from the Northern point of view, but in terms of the men from both sides who lived and died in glory on the fields. Catton's best-selling book, A Stillness at Appomattox, a recount of the most spectacular conflicts between Generals Grant and Lee in the final year of the Civil War, earned him a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award in 1954. Since 1984, the Bruce Catton Prize was awarded for lifetime achievement in the writing of history.

Bruce Catton gives us in this book the Union side of the Civil War, and makes the reader . Bruce Catton's books on the Civil War really make the events live

Bruce Catton gives us in this book the Union side of the Civil War, and makes the reader deeply reverent for all (on both sides) who fought and lost their lives in this great war of the American People. No way to run from the impact of the campaigns, and the maturing of the American mind set from Kansas to Appomattox. Bruce Catton's books on the Civil War really make the events live. His story telling is largely apolitical, though he interweaves the politics of the moment into his story, he remains non judgemental. I'm left to wonder why so many young Americans had to perish, often rotting on the ground after deadly battles, sometimes over non essential farm fields.

Doubleday & Company, Inc. Collection. Universal Digital Library.

Home Browse Books Book details, This Hallowed Ground: The Story of the . Subjects: United War, 1861-1865.

Home Browse Books Book details, This Hallowed Ground: The Story of the Union Side. This Hallowed Ground: The Story of the Union Side of the Civil War. By Bruce Catton. A detailed description of the military and political aspects of the war. Excerpt. The senator was tall and handsome, with wavy hair to frame a proud ravaged face, and if hearty feeding had given him the beginning of a notable paunch he was erect enough to carry it well.

The Story of the Union Side of the Civil War (Wordsworth Military Library). Published January 2001 by Combined Publishing.

The Wordsworth Military Library covers the breadth of military history, including studies of. .

Электронная книга "This Hallowed Ground: A History of the Civil War", Bruce Catton. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки,. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "This Hallowed Ground: A History of the Civil War" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Boston: Little, Brown, 1960. --. Garden City, . Chance, Joseph E. The Second Texas Infantry: From Shiloh to Vicksburg. Lucien . Henry S. Nourse, and John G. Brown. The Story of the 55th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry in the Civil War, 1861–1865.

The following list is a Bibliography of American Civil War Union military unit histories. For an overall national view see Bibliography of the American Civil War. For histories of the Confederacy see Bibliography of American Civil War Confederate military unit histories. For a guide to the bibliography see: Eicher, David J. The Civil War in Books An Analytical Bibliography (1997), an annotated guide to 1100 titles.

This history of the American Civil War chronicles the entire war to preserve the Union - from the Northern point of view, but in terms of the men from both sides who lived and died in glory on the fields.
  • Onath
For a short history of the Civil War, this is the book to read. I first read back in 1961 ( the hundredth anniversary of the Civil War ) when I was in second grade. I thought it was great back then. Then I reread it twenty years later, and it didn't disappoint. Now, at 150th anniversary of the end of the war, I've read it a third time. The book grows with each reading. Catton was at the time ( 1956 ) one of the very few non-academic Civil War writers who wrote without a Southern slant. If anything, he gave it a Northern slant, which is only right considering ( that despite protests to the contrary ) the South was fighting to preserve and even expand slavery. The only other one volume Civil War book I can think of to match this is Battle Cry Freedom. Catton wrote other books on the Civil War that are well worth reading, but this is the one to start with.
  • AfinaS
I first read this book almost 40 years ago. With some nervousness, I picked up a copy to read, wondering how well it has held up with the years. Bruce Catton wrote a number of works during his time--from his examination of the Army of the Potomac to his final two volumes of a 3-work biography of U. S. Grant. A number of things stand out about Catton's work. For one, he is an excellent writer. His books move along smoothly and even eloquently. One is captivated by his style. Two, he can, in a few paragraphs, tell us a great deal about the people of the Civil War. Want to get a sense of the crusty veteran general, Charles F. Smith? In a few broad strokes, you get a sense of the man. Three, he provides broader context on the war and its battles, for example, illustrating at one point the difference between the industrial might of the North and the much less advanced industry of the South. A telling commentary on the raw differences between the two sides.

This book, then, has something in common with McPherson's splendid "Battle Cry of Freedom." As McPherson, Catton provides a context in which to examine the Civil War. However, even though his description of battles and campaigns tends to be terse, one nonetheless gets a sense of what was at stake and how the battles unfolded. Even with only a few paragraphs on the battle at Wilson's Creek, for instance, one gets a sense of the strange saga of the pugnacious General Lyon's outnumbered army trying to envelope the superior southern forces (the text does not mention that making the odds even longer, Lyon depended on Franz Sigel to carry out the envelopment--a most unfortunate choice).

Just so, the discussion of both Gettysburg and Vicksburg is brief but in enough detail to get a sense of the challenges facing both armies at these struggles.

Catton unequivocally identifies slavery as a key issue as a part of the cause of the war; he also points out, here and there, how the Union army came slowly to see the evil of slavery, even as they harbored prejudice against slaves.

If the reader wants detailed analyses of battles, this book would not serve well. If the reader is interested in a well written historical work that looks at the Civil War and its context, then this book should do nicely. Over a half century since its original publication, this book holds up pretty well--and it is written superbly.
  • CrazyDemon
This is a book about war, rebellion and freedom. And Bruce Catton weaves these three ideas with great precision in telling this story about our American Civil War. War is about battle and Catton leaves no stone unturned, describing the battles fought and the participants involved with clarity and precision. No significant action in the Eastern or Western theaters of operation is omitted and the reader is left with an understanding of the shifting, near thing with which many of the engagements are fought. From Bull Run in 1861 to the final contest at Five Forks in 1865, Catton works his audience through the campaigns in singular detail.

With regard to rebellion, Catton is not one to mince words and defines it in one word: Treason. He points out that the South's most significant error was their complete failure to understand early on, the North's total dedication to Union. "The South could only win its independence by destroying the government of the United States. As such Southerners were not merely enemies; they were traitors, to be treated as such." It would be a long and vicious war whose terms and methods of waging it would be defined by Abraham Lincoln.

But it is with regard to freedom that Catton is at the top of his form. He regards the Emancipation Proclamation as the most significant weapon fired during those four long years of war. Declaring slavery extinct in exactly all the areas in which the Federal Government could not enforce the decree, the Emancipation was truly an unusual document. But Lincoln knew its ultimate impact. Emancipation isolated the South. In Catton's words, "It closed a great door in the face of the southern Confederacy. It locked the Confederacy with the anachronism that was the Confederacy's dreadful, fatal burden." Europe could not support slavery. The South was alone with limited manpower, no manufacturing capacity to produce the instruments and material with which to wage war and no friends. The millstone of slavery, that for which it had been fighting, would drag it under.

Catton delivers a thoughtful, stirring analysis of the American Civil War. Written in 1956, This Hallowed Ground is totally devoid of rancor, finger pointing, or the revisionism so prevalent in many of the works of its era. Bruce Catton is probably the most prolific writer on this subject; given his superb writing he is also probably the best.
  • Neol
There were so many OCR errors that I simply could not read it. Almost every paragraph had a sentence I had to struggle to figure out.

I got this version of it because it was half the price of the other kindle edition, and now I see why. This *should* have been obvious to me from the preview, but I didn't do due diligence.

The book itself is great: beautiful prose, and a moving depictions of the emotions of the times. The electronic copy was just a horrible reproduction of a great book.