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Download Hā‘ena: Through the Eyes of the Ancestors eBook

by Carlos Andrade

Download Hā‘ena: Through the Eyes of the Ancestors eBook
ISBN:
0824834100
Author:
Carlos Andrade
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Latitude 20 (May 11, 2009)
Pages:
184 pages
EPUB book:
1168 kb
FB2 book:
1963 kb
DJVU:
1768 kb
Other formats
mobi lrf lit lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
604


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Ha'ena is a land steeped in antiquity yet vibrantly beautiful today as any Hollywood fantasy of a tropical paradise.

Suitable for historians, ethnologists and students of Hawaiian literature and culture, this work examines the stories that identify the origins and places of the earliest inhabitants of Ha'ena. It outlines the unique relationships developed by Hawaiians with the environment and describes the system used to look after the land and the se. 2 people like this topic.

Ha‘ena: Through the Eyes of the Ancestors is a distinctive work, which blends folklore, geography, history, and ethnography. It casts a wide net over information from earliest times to the present, primarily related from a Native perspective.

Ha‘ena is a land steeped in antiquity yet vibrantly beautiful today as any Hollywood fantasy of a tropical paradise. Haena: Through the Eyes of the Ancestors (Latitude 20 Books) Paperback – May 11, 2009. by. Carlos Andrade (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

Ha'ena: Through the Eyes of the Ancestors. Ha'ena is a land steeped in antiquity yet vibrantly beautiful today as any Hollywood fantasy of a tropical paradise.

Find out what other deviants think - about anything at all. Motion book. Spirit of the Eagle - Native American Music: ww. outube. Create comics and graphic novels that jump off the screen.

Through the Eyes of the Law (Ante Los Ojos De La Ley), a book by Major League Baseball pitcher Miguel Batista, is a thriller about a serial killer. It was released on January 25 in the Dominican Republic and on February 10 in Puerto Rico. It has achieved success in both countries.

Hā‘ena is a land steeped in antiquity yet vibrantly beautiful today as any Hollywood fantasy of a tropical paradise. He ‘āina momona, a rich and fertile land linked to the sea and the rising and setting sun, is a place of gods and goddesses: Pele and her sister, Hi‘iaka, and Laka, patron of hula. It epitomizes the best that can be found in the district of northwestern Kaua‘i, known to aboriginal Hawaiians as Hale Le‘a (House of Pleasure and Delight). This work is an ambitious attempt to provide a unique perspective in the complex story of the ahupua‘a of Ha‘ena.

Carlos Andrade begins by examining the stories that identify the origins and places of the earliest inhabitants of Hā‘ena. The narrative outlines the unique relationships developed by Hawaiians with the environment and describes the system used to look after the land and the sea. Andrade goes on to research the changes wrought by concepts and perceptions introduced by European, American, and Asian immigrants. He delves into the impact of land privatization as Hawai‘i struggled to preserve its independence. The Mahele and the Kuleana Act, legislation that laid the foundation for all landholding in Hawai‘i, had a profound influence on Hā‘ena. Part of this story includes a description of the thirty-nine Hawaiians who pooled their resources, bought the entire ahupua‘a of Hā‘ena, and held it in common from the late 1800s to 1967―a little-known chapter in the fight to perpetuate traditional lifeways. Lastly, Andrade collects the stories of kupuna who share their experiences of life in Hā‘ena and surrounding areas, capturing a way of life that is quickly disappearing beneath the rising tide of non-Native people who now inhabit the land.

Hā‘ena: Through the Eyes of the Ancestors is a distinctive work, which blends folklore, geography, history, and ethnography. It casts a wide net over information from earliest times to the present, primarily related from a Native perspective. It should be of great interest to historians, ethnologists, sociologists, and students of Hawaiian language, literature, and culture.

  • Bolv
I read this book while staying in my husbands grandparents house in Wainiha, on Kauai. This book was on the bookshelf in the livingroom. I had to buy one for myself once I left Kauai and returned to the mainland. This book reveals true stories,legends mostly forgotten by the few remaining true Hawaiians. This book, and its wisdom, are priceless.
  • Arakus
While on the North Coast, I picked this book up and couldn't put it down. It's well written and researched. I highly recommend it!
  • Uste
I am a frequent visitor to Ha'ena and this book has added understanding and richness to my experience of this special place.
  • Kison
Since I will be traveling there, I purchased the book. It is well written and very informative. The photo's are priceless.
  • Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
A detailed and easy to read book for people interested in social structures and the impact of colonisation on indigenous people. Thoroughly enjoyed this.
  • Dalarin
Hawaiian history
  • Froststalker
This is the first of what I hope will be many books of Native Hawaiian geography. I mean that this geography springs from Native Hawaiians concerns, sensibilities, language, and practices. It includes mo'olelo (traditions, tales), wind and rain names, surfing and fishing site names, and the stories of the people of Haena. This work is part of the emerging trend in native scholarship to shift the center of scholarship to work produced BY natives rather than about natives. In addition, Andrade is an accomplished musician and lyricist and the eloquent prose in this book reflects those talents. This book should serve as the model for truly native-centered scholarship in Hawaiian studies, geography, anthropology, and history.
GOOD BOOK. LOVE IT.