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Download Sippewissett: Or, Life on a Salt Marsh eBook

by Bobbi Angell,Tim Traver

Download Sippewissett: Or, Life on a Salt Marsh eBook
ISBN:
1933392789
Author:
Bobbi Angell,Tim Traver
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chelsea Green Publishing (March 12, 2008)
Pages:
254 pages
EPUB book:
1942 kb
FB2 book:
1979 kb
DJVU:
1824 kb
Other formats
rtf mbr docx lrf
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
136


Sippewissett is a salt marsh with history, and Tim Traver is an ideal guide who steers his readers through layers of. .

Sippewissett is a salt marsh with history, and Tim Traver is an ideal guide who steers his readers through layers of birth natural and human, personal and expansive. The science of home is a noble pursuit, and Cape Cod has spawned some of our finest literary naturalists. With Sippewissett Traver joins the legacy of gifted seaside storytellers John Hay, Henry Beston, Henry David Thoreau, and Robert Finch. -Ted Levin, author of Liquid Land: A Journey Through the Florida Everglades, winner of the 2004 Burroughs Medal.

Tim Traver's Sippewissett is heir to a rich history of nature writing. Akin to classics like Aldo Leopold's A Sand County Almanac and Annie Dillard's Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, the book forms an eloquent bridge between ecology and memory, science and art. Traver alternates between remembrances of the Cape Cod salt marsh where he spent his boyhood summers and the history of Sippewissett, a place that has been studied by many of America's great biologists, from Louis Agassiz to Rachel Carson.

Sippewissett is an intimate exploration of place by a man of science and strong family bonds. Tim Traver's Sippewissett is heir to a rich history of nature writing

Sippewissett is an intimate exploration of place by a man of science and strong family bonds. Here is one of ecology's most studied places through the eyes of someone determined to make sense of its beauty and complexity-at once private and public-filled with poetry yet grounded in science, a place disappearing in the face of development and global climate change. Tim Traver's Sippewissett is heir to a rich history of nature writing.

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Published six times a year, British Wildlife .

Subscriptions from £30 per year. Go to British Wildlife. Tim Traver's Sippewissett forms an eloquent bridge between ecology and memory, science and art.

Please select "One time" or "Monthly". Please select an amount (minimum 5 USD). Saving Sippewissett - Waquoit - Keeper - Fire. Donate with a payment method. Choose a payment method. Select a payment method. lock Your payment will be securely processed. Questions or problems donating? Maybe later. Presents a history and includes anecdotes about life along the Sippewisset Salt Marsh.

Sippewissett; or, Life on a Salt Marsh, illustrations by Bobbi Angell . Tim Traver is a freelance writer and environmentalist who writes frequently about both travel and science.

Sippewissett; or, Life on a Salt Marsh, illustrations by Bobbi Angell, Chelsea Green Publishing (White River Junction, VT), 2006. Former columnist for the Providence Journal and the Falmouth Enterprise. SIDELIGHTS: Tim Traver is a freelance writer and environmentalist who writes frequently about both travel and science. In his Sippewissett; or, Life on a Salt Marsh, Traver revisits the marshlands of Cape Cod, where he spent his childhood, providing readers with a look at the local ecology and a history of the area that, in part, was responsible for his interest in environmental work.

The Sippewissett Salt Marsh/ Microbial Mat is located along the lower eastern Buzzards Bay shoreline of Cape Cod, about 5 miles north of Woods Hole and 1 mile southwest of West Falmouth, Massachusetts, in the United States. The marsh has two regions, the Great Sippewisset Marsh to the north and Little Sippewisset Marsh to the south, separated from each other by a narrow tongue of land (Saconesset Hills).

Books tagged as 'Marshes' by the Listal community. 2. Sippewissett: Or, Life on a Salt Marsh. Sort by: Tag popularity - Top Rated - Top Rated Popular - Wanted - Recently wanted - Date Added.

Tim Traver's Sippewissett is heir to a rich history of nature writing. Akin to classics like Aldo Leopold's A Sand County Almanac and Annie Dillard's Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, the book forms an eloquent bridge between ecology and memory, science and art. Traver alternates between remembrances of the Cape Cod salt marsh where he spent his boyhood summers and the history of Sippewissett, a place that has been studied by many of America's great biologists, from Louis Agassiz to Rachel Carson.

There is poetry in his retelling of the past, a childhood of mud and tides and water; there is great love in the peace and satisfaction he finds later in life fishing and clamming and watching his own children discover the secrets of the marsh. Traver manages to weave these personal details into mesmerizing historical passages and meditations on the ecology of place that read like whodunits; one discovery leads to another, from the most beautiful dance of life to more somber considerations, such as the way the marsh can tell us so much about our environmental crises. Sippewissett is an intimate exploration of place by a man of science and strong family bonds. Here is one of ecology's most studied places through the eyes of someone determined to make sense of its beauty and complexity--at once private and public--filled with poetry yet grounded in science, a place disappearing in the face of development and global climate change.

  • Lyrtois
This was an enjoyable book. Traver apparently views the world in a way very similar to my own. He values those long walks in a natural environment more than most everything else. His daughters for instance are an example that take precedence over life outdoors. These are easy things to relate to.

This book is ostensibly about life, memories and ecology as it relates to the Massachusetts' salt marsh Sippewissett. Those of us who are tyros when it comes to salt marshes get some instruction in an understandable way. We learn about the grasses, birds and other life but we learn a lot about Traver. It is very personalized as he relates events and people that were important to him as he grew up in the marsh.

The book is broken into twenty four essays that are only marginally sequential. It is written as if while musing, Traver remembers an event or wants to opine his views. This is not to say that he is sentimental or finger wagging, quite the contrary. Traver is confident that the battle to save swamp marshes will come from science when it comes to the ecology. The people and culture though require something less reductive than that.

When I received the book in the mail the other day, I set aside my current reading to browse it. I hardly put it down. The essays that I found to be the best were the ones on birds, microbes, fences and daughters to be the ones I enjoyed the most.
[...]
  • inform
Excellent read! Traver does a remarkable job of weaving reflections of the salt marsh with larger issues of life! Worthy of future rereads!
  • Landamath
This book is not only about marsh but about nature itself it gives the reader something to think about . Excellent read
  • Zaryagan
We bought four more copies for friends and family. Our UU minister is building a service around just part of this. Add our emphasis on the incredible continuous dedication to researching life of this marsh over 75 years starting with Rachel Carson.
  • August
From the opening sentence of Tim Traver's Sippewisset, you can tell that the author has spent a great deal of his life attuning to the rhythms of Nature. There is a rhythmic, undulatory quality to his prose, echoing the ebb and flow of water, wind, and wondrous life that is the perennial pulse of his beloved Sippewisset salt marsh.

Beloved. Be loved. The tradition of American nature writing might be said to ever and again utter this adjective and this injunction. American places have been celebrated by nature writers because they are beloved by the writer, whose words then invite us readers to love them as well. The act of loving a place is usually in nature books a wholly affirmative undertaking, risking at times and often succumbing to a saccharine sentimentality. Traver's Sippewisset keeps us listening to a muted but undeniable voice of negation as counterpoint to the author's reveling in beauty and slack-jawed marveling at biological process. There is a bit of the ascetic monk in Traver; the lean voice of the desert haunts his reveries about making a home on this good green earth of ours.

One hears in Tim Traver's voice a relentless questioning of the ways that natural science knows this well-studied wet spot on the sand margin of Cape Cod. Along with the lively pictures he gives us of scientists past (like Louis Agassiz & Rachel Carson) and present (John Teal, Lynn Margulis, and others) at work in the field, Traver constantly communicates his own inner landscape as he seeks to answer the driving question of the book: "How do we save both the soul of a place like Sippewisset and our own souls?"

Soul is a quality more endangered on this marshy planet than even the most fragile wetland, and the beauty of this book is that as deeply and intelligently as it penetrates the microbes in the mud of Sippewisset, Traver always puts the smelly stuff in service to the messy muds of our modern alienated minds. And as serious business as this soul-making search for sacred stewardship gets, we feel him always at play. The ten-year-old hunter of crabs and clams is never far away from the seasoned chronicler of biological process.

Seasoned. Sipewisset's seasons -- carried particularly by its animal denizens -- are of course here. And so are the seasonings of tasty prose inspired by the sheer fecundity of the place. But the reader will quickly come to feel that for all of his boyish wonder and playfulness, Traver is fully seasoned, his reflections upon Nature and Life warmed by the practicality that mature humanhood will convey upon any earnest participant in the mystery of life. Go walk and talk and play with him in his favorite place on Earth.

Kevin Dann

Department of History

Plattsburgh State University

author, Lewis Creek Lost & Found; Across the Great Border Fault; Traces on the Appalachians
  • JOIN
Tim Traver writes with grace, humor and insight. He tells the compelling story of a small salt marsh on Cape Cod - where he, his family and friends spent endless summers discovering the world and themselves. His story blends intimate memories of growing up - fearless and curious - with science history and the broad progress of ecological inquiry. Readers are drawn into a thoughtful journey that reveals our place in the living, still-breathing world. Traver's salt marsh is transformed into a harbinger of the planet's health. We learn that everything we do matters.
  • Malojurus
Traver's stories in Sippewissett make the progression of environmentalists in the Eastern United States a tale of interest, rather than one of dry history. And the recounting of Traver's childhood, young adulthood, and recent visits to the magnificient marsh bring this place and its inhabitants of all kinds to life. I can almost hear the birds cry and feel the slimey smoothness of the fish. What a wonderful read. I've even shared some of the passages with my teenage son.

Such a delightful book!
A delight! Well written story of one man's life-long enjoyment of and study of one of Cape Cod's best kept treasures - Sippewisset Salt Marsh. This is an accessible account of the value of salt marshes in protecting our environment and how important it is to preserve marshes for the future.