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Download Matt Field on the Santa Fe Trail (American Exploration and Travel Series) eBook

by Clyde Porter,Mae Reed Porter,John E. Sunder,Mark L. Gardner,Matthew C. Field

Download Matt Field on the Santa Fe Trail (American Exploration and Travel Series) eBook
ISBN:
0806127163
Author:
Clyde Porter,Mae Reed Porter,John E. Sunder,Mark L. Gardner,Matthew C. Field
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Oklahoma Press (April 15, 1995)
Pages:
368 pages
EPUB book:
1705 kb
FB2 book:
1521 kb
DJVU:
1411 kb
Other formats
rtf doc azw mobi
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
763


Matt Field (a former stage actor) was about 31 in 1839 when he joined a caravan heading to Santa Fe from Missouri.

Matt Field (a former stage actor) was about 31 in 1839 when he joined a caravan heading to Santa Fe from Missouri. I enjoyed a lot of Matt's adventures and anecdotes.

by Clyd cess, Clyde Porter, Matthew C. Field, et a. In 1839 a journalist for the New Orleans Picayune, Matthew C. Field, joined a company of merchants and tourists headed west on the Santa Fe Trail

In 1839 a journalist for the New Orleans Picayune, Matthew C. Field, joined a company of merchants and tourists headed west on the Santa Fe Trail.

Items related to MATT FIELD ON THE SANTA FE TRAIL. High-Lonesome Books, located in the foothills of the Gila National Forest of southwest New Mexico, has been in business since 1986. Matt field on the santa fe trail. The journal of Matt Field during his summer on the Santa Fe Trail and in the settlements of New Mexico during the summer of 1839 as well as many articles he proceeded to write for the New Orleans Picayune. Bookseller Inventory 10133. Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details.

Matt Field on the Santa Fe Trail (American Exploration and Travel Series).

collected by Clyde and Mae Reed Porter. Other Products from alexshanbooks (View All). Franklin Library Confessions of Saint Augustine 1982 Hardcover Illustrated.

The Magoffins traveled along the Santa Fe trail and down into Mexico in the wake of the invading United States army during the Mexican–American . Field, Porter & Porter 1995, p. 208-209. University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 978-0-8061-2716-3.

Field, Porter & Porter 1995, p. Telgen 1993, p. 52. ^ Ortiz Hill 2012.

Few Americans knew much about New Mexico when Willard set out on his journey from St. Charles, Missouri, where he had recently completed a medical.

The Magoffins traveled along the Santa Fe trail and down into Mexico in the wake of the invading United States army during the . Field, Matthew . Porter, Clyde; Porter, Mae Reed (1995).

The Magoffins traveled along the Santa Fe trail and down into Mexico in the wake of the invading United States army during the Mexican–American War (1846-1848) Across the plains.

The Santa Fe Trail’s role as the major western trade route in the early to mid-nineteenth century made it a critical part of America’s Westward expansion and the stories of its heyday include some of the greatest adventures in the history of the Old West.

The Santa Fe Trail is a 1930 American pre-Code western film, directed by Otto Brower and Edwin H. Knopf, released by Paramount Pictures, and starring Richard Arlen, Rosita Moreno, and Eugene Pallette. Richard Arlen as Stan Hollister. Rosita Moreno as Maria Castinado. Eugene Pallette as Doc Brady. Mitzi Green as Emily. Junior Durkin as Old Timer. Hooper Atchley as Marc Coulard. Luis Alberni as Juan Castinado. Lee Shumway as Slaven. Chief Standing Bear as Chief Sutanek. Blue Cloud as Eagle Feather.

In 1839 a journalist for the New Orleans Picayune, Matthew C. Field, joined a company of merchants and tourists headed west on the Santa Fe Trail. Leaving Independence, Missouri, early in July "with a few wagons and a carefree spirit," Field recorded his vivid impressions of travel westward on the Santa Fe Trail and, on the return trip, eastward along the Cimarron Route. Written in verse in his journal and in eighty-five articles later published in the Picayune, Field’s observations offer the modern reader a unique glimpse of life in the settlements of Mexico and on the Santa Fe Trail.

  • Perius
Really beautiful book, better than described. Hard to find item which arrived very promptly. Very happy with transaction and would recommend!
  • The Sphinx of Driz
Matt Field (a former stage actor) was about 31 in 1839 when he joined a caravan heading to Santa Fe from Missouri. This book contains his newspaper articles about his trip there and back (however the beginning of the book contains quite a lengthy poem about the trip... about 45 pages!). I enjoyed a lot of Matt's adventures and anecdotes. The downside for me was Matt's need to keep reminding the reader about his Christianity, writing things like (and I paraphrase): "We have just left the last Christian habitation as we enter the plains." However, I have to consider the time period in which he grew up that would make him write these types of things. As someone who does not believe in religion, I found this a bit disconcerting but it didn't ruin the book for me. Like I said, many of his adventures and anecdotes were pretty good and offset what I disliked. All in all, a good read and I'm the better for it.
  • Venemarr
Matt Field, a middling actor down on his luck, sickly, rejected twice by two different women when he proposed marriage, decided in 1839 to take a trip to Santa Fe with one of the trading caravans headed to that city from Independence, Missouri. Accompanied by a few friends, he steamboated from St. Louis to Independence, where in July he joined a small (18 men) caravan and set out across the plains. Going through Council Grove on to Bent's Fort, he continued over Raton Pass after which he left the main caravan and followed a trail to Taos and then down to Santa Fe. Thoroughly enjoying his stay in Santa Fe, but fearing a winter crossing of the plains, he left the capital late in September, took the Cimarron Cutoff, and made it back to Independence by the last day in October.

Fortunately for posterity, Field kept a journal of his trip, which is included here; he was also later hired by the New Orleans Picayune to write a number of articles based on his travels and experiences (they also are included here and make up the main portion of the book). A budding poet as well as an actor, Field turned his outward-bound journal into a long epic poem (the return leg remained in typical diary form). Though his poetic skills are not very good, this poem remains a unique document in the annals of western literature. The newspaper articles are another matter; they are superbly written and fascinating to read. The articles were meant to entertain readers, and hearsay and embellishment abound, but their bases are in fact and in what Field experienced. Everything seemed to be worthy of his attention and subsequent relating, from sights along the trail to humorous anecdotes related to him by others he met along the way. There is the obligatory grizzly bear story and thunderstorm-on-the-prairie story, but also more personal items such as a funeral in Taos and a wedding in Santa Fe. The articles ran for two years in the Picayune and as they still do today must have brought much enthusiasm to their first readers. The trade along the Santa Fe Trail was in decline by 1839, and to have Field's first-hand impressions of what it was like then is remarkable. It's among the half-dozen most important original works regarding the trail and the trade and the people who were involved with both, and it's a delight to read. Highly recommended.