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Download Black Life on the Mississippi: Slaves, Free Blacks, and the Western Steamboat World eBook

by Thomas C. Buchanan

Download Black Life on the Mississippi: Slaves, Free Blacks, and the Western Steamboat World eBook
ISBN:
0807829099
Author:
Thomas C. Buchanan
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press; 1st edition (November 29, 2004)
Pages:
272 pages
EPUB book:
1239 kb
FB2 book:
1900 kb
DJVU:
1120 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
406


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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. All along the Mississippi-on country plantation landings, urban levees and quays, and the decks of h-century African Americans worked and fought for their liberty amid the slave trade and the growth of the cotton South. Offering a counternarrative to Twain's well-known tale from the perspective of the pilothouse.

Thomas Buchanan follows David Cecelski's study of North Carolina's black maritime sailors with this excellent study of black steamboat workers on the Mississippi

Thomas Buchanan follows David Cecelski's study of North Carolina's black maritime sailors with this excellent study of black steamboat workers on the Mississippi. Buchanan describes the culture in which the free black and enslaved steamboat crewmen lived, their importance to the southern antebellum economy, as well as, their impact on the institution of slavery. It is in this area that Buchanan an important contribution to our understanding of African American resistance to slavery.

the western steamboat world, Thomas C. Buchanan

the western steamboat world, Thomas C. Buchanan. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Portions of this book appeared earlier, in somewhat different form, in Thomas C. Buchanan, Black Life on the Mississippi: African American Steamboat Laborers and the Work Culture of Antebellum Western Steamboats, in The African American Urban Experience: Perspectives from the Colonial Period to the Present, ed.

Home Browse Books Book details, Black Life on the Mississippi: Slaves, Free. Black Life on the Mississippi: Slaves, Free Blacks, and the Western Steamboat World. By Thomas C. The networks African Americans created allowed them to keep in touch with family members, help slaves escape, transfer stolen goods, and provide forms of income that were important to the survival of their communities. The author also details the struggles that took place within the steamboat work culture.

St. Louis, my home, being an essential part of the "western steamboat world," I was fairly sure I would enjoy this book

The networks African Americans created allowed them to keep in touch with family members, help slaves escape, transfer stolen goods, and provide forms of income that were important to the survival of their communities. St. Louis, my home, being an essential part of the "western steamboat world," I was fairly sure I would enjoy this book.

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The networks African Americans created allowed them to keep in touch with family members, help slaves escape, transfer stolen goods, and provide forms of income that were important to the survival of their communities.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2006, Nikki Taylor and others published Black Life on the Mississippi: Slaves, Free .

The Emancipation Proclamation of 1862 marked more than the ostensible freeing of slaves in the United States; it also marked the beginning of a transmigration of black people that would forever alter the culture of the country. Many ex-slaves moved north or stayed in the South; others (far fewer in number) decided to test the American dream of success in the West that stretched from the.

All along the Mississippi-on country plantation landings, urban levees and quays, and the decks of steamboats .

All along the Mississippi-on country plantation landings, urban levees and quays, and the decks of h-century African Americans worked and fought for their liberty amid the slave trade and the growth of the cotton South. Although the realities of white supremacy were still potent on the river, Buchanan shows how slaves, free blacks, and postemancipation freedpeople fought for better wages and treatment.

Monday, October 3, 2011 Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome - Jo. .

Monday, October 3, 2011. Home slavery Black Life on the Mississippi: Slaves, Free Blacks, and the Western Steamboat World by Thomas C. Black Life on the Mississippi: Slaves, Free Blacks, and the Western Steamboat World by Thomas C. Black Life on the Mississippi. 6:45 PM. Daily Life slavery Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome - Joy DeGruy. The Vixen Diaries by Karrine Steffans.

All along the Mississippi--on country plantation landings, urban levees and quays, and the decks of steamboats--nineteenth-century African Americans worked and fought for their liberty amid the slave trade and the growth of the cotton South. Offering a counternarrative to Twain's well-known tale from the perspective of the pilothouse, Thomas C. Buchanan paints a more complete picture of the Mississippi, documenting the rich variety of experiences among slaves and free blacks who lived and worked on the lower decks and along the river during slavery, through the Civil War, and into emancipation.Buchanan explores the creative efforts of steamboat workers to link riverside African American communities in the North and South. The networks African Americans created allowed them to keep in touch with family members, help slaves escape, transfer stolen goods, and provide forms of income that were important to the survival of their communities. The author also details the struggles that took place within the steamboat work culture. Although the realities of white supremacy were still potent on the river, Buchanan shows how slaves, free blacks, and postemancipation freedpeople fought for better wages and treatment. By exploring the complex relationship between slavery and freedom, Buchanan sheds new light on the ways African Americans resisted slavery and developed a vibrant culture and economy up and down America's greatest river.All along the Mississippi--on country plantation landings, urban levees and quays, and the decks of steamboats--nineteenth-century African Americans worked and fought for their liberty amid the slave trade and the growth of the cotton South. Offering a counternarrative to Twain's well-known tale from the perspective of the pilothouse, Thomas Buchanan paints a more complete picture of the Mississippi, documenting the rich variety of experiences among slaves and free blacks who lived and worked on the lower decks and along the river during slavery, through the Civil War, and into emancipation. By exploring the complex relationship between slavery and freedom, Buchanan sheds new light on the ways African Americans resisted slavery and developed a vibrant culture and economy up and down America's greatest river.-->
  • Beydar
I've read this book two times and loved it so much I had to buy my own copy! I am intrigued by the history of the Antebellum era, and Thomas Buchanan presents a well-researched look at life on and around the Mississippi river for African Americans, both enslaved and free. It is a well organized and easy read. African Americans served as laborers, waiters, porters etc. The success of the commerce on the Mississippi depended on them. The mobility of African Americans working the major waterway and tributaries provided them some measure of freedom.
  • Gtonydne
Thomas Buchanan follows David Cecelski's study of North Carolina's black maritime sailors with this excellent study of black steamboat workers on the Mississippi. Buchanan describes the culture in which the free black and enslaved steamboat crewmen lived, their importance to the southern antebellum economy, as well as, their impact on the institution of slavery. It is in this area that Buchanan an important contribution to our understanding of African American resistance to slavery.

John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger's book on runaway slaves is the most extensive treatments of the subject. Unfortunately, they give short shrift to the importance of the Mississippi River and the steamboat trade as a means of escaping slavery. Buchanan corrects this omission by arguing that African Americans, both free and slave, were a vital part of the steamboat industry's labor force. Runaway slaves from throughout the South often made their escape by blending in with other black steamboat workers and riding steamboats out of slavery. Although aware of the problem, and although numerous measures were enacted to stop it, Southerners were never able to completely stop the flow of slaves escaping by riverboat.

In addition to this book, Buchanan has written two articles on this subject. I recommend all them to anyone interested in the study of African American antebellum life.
  • MeGa_NunC
This is a well-researched and smoothly written account of African-American life on the steamboats of the Mississippi before and after the Civil War, highly recommended. However, I strongly resent paying nearly $15.00 for a kindle edition which does not make active links to the (extensive and interesting) notes. I can forgive not live-linking the index, since one can keyword search quite easily, but what's the excuse for not making footnotes live links on the kindle? shame shame shame!!!
  • Qudanilyr
This is an intriguing examination of the Mississippi River as an artery, including some tributaries such as the Ohio and Missouri. Old Muddy drained both free and slave states, and a steamboat trip up or down river necessarily went through both, opening up possibilities for work and for escape for the enslaved. It's a lively account and offers a new take on life on the river for readers interested in the Mississippi. A few stories of individuals liven up the narrative. You'll gain an better appreciation of the complexity of trade and travel in the pre-Civil war steamboat era.

African Americans worked on the river in fairly large numbers, as labor, sometimes crew, wood choppers, cooks, valets on boats and other jobs that needed to be done to keep the boats and ports running. It was a way for blacks to experience varied places, sometimes to earn money for themselves as well as owners, and was a route for information as well. Slaves might be given passes by their owners permitting them to work, or they might be leased out. Free blacks had a better opportunity of earning money on the river than in many cities. River towns had black sections, interconnected in a way by the river. It's not as if the River made people free, because the whole repressive system operated there, too, but the mobile society on the river was more fluid.

The basic point of the book is that even if they were slaves, blacks on the river were much more free than on the land.
  • Isha
Having grown up back in a day when we were taught Antebellum life was a monolithic experience for African Americans, books like this - opening an entirely new door on that era - always fascinate me even though by now, I know better. For example, who knew that some slaves hired themselves out on steamboats for a few weeks or months with no intention of escaping, but simply as respite from the hardships of plantation life?

The title is obviously a play on Mark Twain's nostalgic memoir. Though Buchanan does find some similarities between Twain's liberating experience of the Great River and the opportunities afforded African Americans by the western rivers - for example, mind broadening mobility, communication networks, accumulation of assets by both slave and free persons through labor or trade, and of course, escape routes for fugitives - he notes the dark side absent from steamboat nostalgia is the fact that the horrible "Second Middle Passage" broke up families and transported thousands of slaves in deplorable conditions into the Deep South.

Whether exploring the lives and culture of steamboat workers, free black travelers, abolitionists or scoundrels, the author draws upon the experiences and observations of many individuals through a variety of primary and secondary sources (including slave narratives and travel accounts) demonstrating how multifarious and uncategorizable the experiences of these men and women were. Even many of the laws and customs attempting to control black movement were circumvented in this fluid economy.

Buchanan's writing is concise, and his narrative flows smoothly. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in maritime history as well as those interested in African American Studies.
  • Zargelynd
Buchanan weaves the compelling narratives of slave, free black, and white workers and passengers on Mississippi steamboats with extensive archival information.

He shows how the river network and steamboat work allowed them to craft multiple ways to resist slavery, poor labor conditions, and the separation of families.

This is a history book with broad appeal to non-historians as well.