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Download The Politics of Public Housing: Black Women's Struggles Against Urban Inequality (Transgressing Boundaries) eBook

by Rhonda Y. Williams

Download The Politics of Public Housing: Black Women's Struggles Against Urban Inequality (Transgressing Boundaries) eBook
ISBN:
0195158903
Author:
Rhonda Y. Williams
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (September 9, 2004)
Pages:
320 pages
EPUB book:
1141 kb
FB2 book:
1532 kb
DJVU:
1307 kb
Other formats
lit txt mobi mbr
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
281


Rhonda Y. Williams is Associate Professor of Women's Studies and History at Case Western Reserve University.

Rhonda Y. Series: Transgressing Boundaries: Studies in Black Politics and Black Communities. In this landmark case study, historian Rhonda Y. Williams redefines postwar urban history by placing black women's struggles at the center of an engaging and richly detailed narrative. Specifically, Williams focuses on the housing activism of poor black women in Baltimore to craft a story that expands the contours of the black freedom movement.

Электронная книга "The Politics of Public Housing: Black Women's Struggles against Urban Inequality", Rhonda Y. Williams

Электронная книга "The Politics of Public Housing: Black Women's Struggles against Urban Inequality", Rhonda Y. Williams. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Politics of Public Housing: Black Women's Struggles against Urban Inequality" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Black women have traditionally represented the canvas on which many debates about poverty and welfare have been drawn. For a quarter century after the publication of the notorious Moynihan report, poor black women were tarred with the same brush: "ghetto moms" or "welfare queens" living off the state, with little ambition or hope of an independent future. In this collective biography, Rhonda Y. Williams takes us behind, and beyond, politically expedient labels to provide an incisive and intimate portrait of poor black women in urban America.

The Politics of Public Housing Black Womens Struggles Against Urban Inequality Transgressing Boundar.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. Black women have traditionally represented the canvas on which many debates about poverty and welfare have been drawn. For a quarter century after the publication of the notorious Moynihan report, poor black women were tarred with the same brush: ghetto moms or welfare queens living off the state, with little ambition or hope of an independent future.

Struggles Against Urban Inequality, by. Rhonda Y. The book begins with a history of. public housing policies and the Wentworth.

Inequality by Rhonda Y. Struggles Against Urban Inequality, by. University Press, 2004.

The Politics of Public Housing: Black Women's Struggles Against Urban Inequality (Transgressing Boundaries). Download (pdf, . 1 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

In this collective biography, Rhonda Y. Drawing on dozens of interviews, Williams challenges the notion that low-income housing was a resounding failure that doomed three consecutive generations of post-war Americans to entrenched poverty. Instead, she recovers a history of grass-roots activism, of political awakening, and of class mobility, all facilitated by the creation of affordable public housing. Oxford University Press, 9 сент.

In similar ways, Rhonda Williams The Politics of Public Housing .

In similar ways, Rhonda Williams The Politics of Public Housing: Black Women’s Struggle Against Urban Inequality explores public housing as a site in which poor black women not only found shelter but also immersed themselves in political activism/education that perhaps may not have been possible otherwise. In doing so, Williams hopes to accomplish several tasks.

Following the New Deal era black women with low-incomes were dependent upon help from growing government programs.

Black women have traditionally represented the canvas on which many debates about poverty and welfare have been drawn. For a quarter century after the publication of the notorious Moynihan report, poor black women were tarred with the same brush: "ghetto moms" or "welfare queens" living off the state, with little ambition or hope of an independent future. At the same time, the history of the civil rights movement has all too often succumbed to an idolatry that stresses the centrality of prominent leaders while overlooking those who fought daily for their survival in an often hostile urban landscape. In this collective biography, Rhonda Y. Williams takes us behind, and beyond, politically expedient labels to provide an incisive and intimate portrait of poor black women in urban America. Drawing on dozens of interviews, Williams challenges the notion that low-income housing was a resounding failure that doomed three consecutive generations of post-war Americans to entrenched poverty. Instead, she recovers a history of grass-roots activism, of political awakening, and of class mobility, all facilitated by the creation of affordable public housing. The stereotyping of black women, especially mothers, has obscured a complicated and nuanced reality too often warped by the political agendas of both the left and the right, and has prevented an accurate understanding of the successes and failures of government anti-poverty policy. At long last giving human form to a community of women who have too often been treated as faceless pawns in policy debates, Rhonda Y. Williams offers an unusually balanced and personal account of the urban war on poverty from the perspective of those who fought, and lived, it daily.
  • Jarortr
This book was awesome, informative and give a better understanding of each one of these women struggles to overcome social injustice. Also my mom Rudell Martin is one of the women in the struggle. What a blessing to understanding her struggle and so many like her.
  • Velellan
Great study of many of the personalities I knew so well.
  • Yar
I has to read this book for my Integrative Studies class at Michigan State. I was enlightened on the subject of urban housing and the women who lived and worked in them. Toward the middle end, the book got very repetitive and it dragged along. This was ok. The Author could have done a better job.
  • Kriau
In this landmark case study, historian Rhonda Y. Williams redefines postwar urban history by placing black women's struggles at the center of an engaging and richly detailed narrative. Specifically, Williams focuses on the housing activism of poor black women in Baltimore to craft a story that expands the contours of the black freedom movement. By detailing the activism of low income women around everyday issues of "housing, food, clothing, and daily life in community spaces"--what the author describes as "activism at the point of consumption--The Politics of Public Housing unveils a hidden history of political struggle. Ultimately, this book chronicles the lives and heroic activism of tenants, community organizers, and single mothers who demanded dignity instead of demonization and held onto their self-respect in the face of horrible living conditions, insensitive bureacrats, and stigmas against pubic housing residents that relegated them to the political margins. Rhonda Y. Williams has successfully rescued these women's stories from history's dustbin and in the process produced a groundbreaking work of history. Readers interested in African-American, women's, urban, and working class history will enjoy this book.
  • Āłł_Ÿøūrš
I can't believe my grandmother is one of these amazing ladies in the cover! Well researched and told the real struggle