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Download The Shame of Savo: Anatomy of a Naval Disaster eBook

by Chris Coulthard-Clark,Bruce Loxton

Download The Shame of Savo: Anatomy of a Naval Disaster eBook
ISBN:
1864482869
Author:
Chris Coulthard-Clark,Bruce Loxton
Category:
Australia & Oceania
Language:
English
Publisher:
Allen & Unwin (April 1997)
Pages:
352 pages
EPUB book:
1440 kb
FB2 book:
1807 kb
DJVU:
1488 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
789


The Shame of Savo book.

The Shame of Savo book. Bruce Loxton (who served on the Canberra) and Chris Coulthard-Clark confront the American perception of Australian culpabilty in the disaster, questioning the competence of US Allied forces: Why did the US destroyer "C This is a controversial look at the events surrounding the Allied disaster of the battles of Savo Island and Guadalcanal, and the sinking of the "Canberra".

Chris Coulthard-Clark is one of Australia's leading historians in the field of Australian defence history. Bruce Loxton retired as a commodore in 1978 having commanded three ships and served, amongst other positions, as Director of Naval Intelligence and Australian Naval Attache, Washington.

Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.

Anatomy of a Naval Disaster. Descripton: This book covers the tragedy that became known as the Battle of Savo Island. By Loxton, Bruce with Coulthard-Clark, Chris 1997, Allen & Unwin ISBN 1557508380 Paperback, 320 pages, 14 maps, b&w photos. HMAS Canberra was sunk without firing a shot, and scuttled without an attempt being made to save her. The Japanese force responsible escaped virtually unscathed. How did the Japanese gain the element of surprise, where was the Allied air cover and why did the aircraft carriers depart so quickly?

Chris Coulthard-Clark is one of Australia's leading historians in the field of Australian defence history.

The Shame of Savo: Anatomy of a Naval Disaster. Bruce Loxton, Chris Coulthard-Clark

The Shame of Savo: Anatomy of a Naval Disaster. Bruce Loxton, Chris Coulthard-Clark. This is a controversial look at the events surrounding the Allied disaster of the battles of Savo Island and Guadalcanal, and the sinking of the "Canberra". Bruce Loxton (who served on the Canberra. More).

by Bruce Loxton, Chris Coultard-Clark (Contributor). For more than half a century, an air of innuendo, accusation and mystery has surrounded the Battle of Savo Island, fought off the southern Solomon Islands during the early morning hours of 9 August 1942

by Bruce Loxton, Chris Coultard-Clark (Contributor). For more than half a century, an air of innuendo, accusation and mystery has surrounded the Battle of Savo Island, fought off the southern Solomon Islands during the early morning hours of 9 August 1942. How was it that a powerful group of Allied cruisers had been surprised and almost annihilated by a Japanese striking force obliged to travel hundreds of miles through waters patrolled by Allied reconnaissance aircraft?

Bruce Loxton (who served on the Canberra) and Chris Coulthard-Clark confront the American perception of Australian culpabilty in the disaster, questioning the competence of US Allied forces: Why did the US destroyer.

Bruce Loxton (who served on the Canberra) and Chris Coulthard-Clark confront the American perception of Australian culpabilty in the disaster, questioning the competence of US Allied forces: Why did the US destroyer Chicago fail to join the battle and wander off westward, leaving landing anchorages exposed to enemy action? . Compelling evidence is presented that the Canberra was crippled by friendly fire - hit on the starboard side while engaging the enemy to port. The Shame of Savo looks at the various investigations made into the disaster, discusses the accuracy (or otherwise) of their conclusions and looks to wider reasons why the Allies performed so badly.

For more than half a century, an air of innuendo, accusation and mystery has surrounded the Battle of Savo Island, fought off the southern Solomon Islands during the early morning hours of 9 August 1942. How was it that a powerful group of Allied cruisers had been surprised and almost annihilated by a Japanese striking force obliged to travel hundreds of miles through waters patrolled by Allied reconnaissance aircraft? And why - given the overwhelming air strength available to the Allies due to the presence of their aircraft carriers - were the Japanese able to escape afterwards practically unscathed, leaving more than a thousand Allied seamen dead in their wake? Who was to blame - if anyone was to blame - for such a monumental disaster? In this brilliant study, written by a retired senior Ausutralian naval officer, many of the myths and misunderstandings concerning this important naval action have been exposed and corrected. Bruce Loxton, then a midshipman, was seriously wounded on the bridge of HMAS Canberra when that heavy cruiser was disabled during the opening stages of the battle. For him, reaching the truth of this affair became the passionate culmination of a lo
  • Zeleence
i've yet to finish the book as the information is complex as are most cause/effect references in battle analysis. yet, the narrative flows well and should keep even novice historians glued to it. well worth having if you want the 'whole' story. considering i've been attempting to delve into the full story of this theatre of action, it has taken years of work for many authors to come up with definitive answers to the oh so many unanswered questions. this author has done well indeed.
  • Delaath
Very good account
  • Insanity
Nice to read a book that shows flaws in U.S. commanders.Most books,especially autobiograhpies tend to show all of them as never making any mistakesWould. have liked it to include amount of damage to Japanese ships in greater detail.Also photos from Ballards trip would have been nice.
  • Reighbyra
"The Shame of Savo: Anatomy of a Naval Disaster", by Bruce Loxton, United States Naval Inst.; (November 1994). At first, I was taken aback by the title, expecting some Anglo-American finger pointing. Despite the title, Commodore Loxton does not heap shame on the USN or even suggest that there was shame. In fact, the only shame was the shame that the USN felt at such a humiliating defeat. Loxton is clear that he regarded the entire debacle as due to lack of war time experience. It was a necessary knock on the head that got the USN out of its peace-time mind set.
The Canberra gets disproportionate coverage, but that is not a defect. After all, that is where Loxton had first hand knowledge. Loxton was at the battle as a mid-shipman on the Canberra. However, the coverage of the other ships is also informative. As a reader of naval history, I have often wondered just what went wrong on the ships of the Northern group. How could they be taken by surprise when there was obvious combat going on a few miles away? Loxton reveals that they were not taken entirely by surprise, but rather they were not drilled in quickly coming to general quarters. They were in the wrong type of watch. Damage control closed water tight doors before crewmen could get to their stations, creating huge traffic jams. The US ships were simply not prepared for the rapidly evolving type battle that would characterize the drive by shooting type of night combat in the slot.
  • Shliffiana
Detailed description of the battle action. However a deeply flawed analysis of the overall strategic position. The Americans were right not to risk their carriers close to shore based Japanese bombers. The loss of the carriers would would have laid the marines wide open to destruction.