almediah.fr
» » Paris After The Liberation: New Edition

Download Paris After The Liberation: New Edition eBook

by Antony Beevor

Download Paris After The Liberation: New Edition eBook
ISBN:
0141015543
Author:
Antony Beevor
Category:
Europe
Language:
English
Publisher:
Penguin Books Ltd (May 6, 2004)
Pages:
448 pages
EPUB book:
1485 kb
FB2 book:
1693 kb
DJVU:
1221 kb
Other formats
doc mbr mbr doc
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
360


Yet, I think this book is unfocused

Yet, I think this book is unfocused. Beevor and Cooper really needed to decide whether they were writing a book about the City of Paris in the Liberation and life and events in it, or a history of France from 1944 until 1968. The focus shifts in too many places from goings on and life in the city to the national political alignment in France, international events affecting France, and relations between other countries dealing with France, political events in France outside the city, etc.

Paris after the liberation. Antony Beevor wrote his first novel when he lived in Paris for two years. Antony Beevor and Artemis Cooper. There is hardly any aspect of French life during that period which. His works of non-fiction include The Spanish Civil War, Crete: The Battle and the Resistance, which received the 1993 Runciman Award, Stalingrad, a No. 1 bestseller which won the Samuel Johnson Prize, the Wolfson History Prize and the Hawthornden Prize in 1999, and its companion volume, Berlin: The Downfall, 1945.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Paris: After the Liberation 1944-1949 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Antony Beevor, Artemis Cooper. Категория: КНИГИ ВОЕННАЯ ИСТОРИЯ.

I enjoyed Antony Beevor's book on the. Antony Beevor was educated at Winchester and Sandhurst. Пользовательский отзыв - john257hopper - LibraryThing. A regular officer in the 11th Hussars, he served in Germany and England.

A beautifully written book about a vast tapestry of military, political and social upheaval. I was a witness to events in Paris in the first desperate, glorious, mad weeks, and this is just how it was' Dirk Bogarde. Post-liberation Paris: an epoch charged with political and conflicting emotions

A beautifully written book about a vast tapestry of military, political and social upheaval. Post-liberation Paris: an epoch charged with political and conflicting emotions

Paris After the Liberation 1944-1949. In this brilliant synthesis of social, political, and cultural history, Antony Beevor and Artemis Cooper present a vivid and compelling portrayal of the City of Lights after its liberation

Paris After the Liberation 1944-1949. Antony Beevor & Artemis Cooper. In this brilliant synthesis of social, political, and cultural history, Antony Beevor and Artemis Cooper present a vivid and compelling portrayal of the City of Lights after its liberation. Paris became the diplomatic battleground in the opening stages of the Cold War.

Sunday Telegraph From Antony Beevor, the internationally bestselling .

Sunday Telegraph From Antony Beevor, the internationally bestselling author of D-Day and The Battle of Arnhem In this brilliant synthesis of social, political, and cultural history, Antony Beevor and Artemis Cooper present a vivid and compelling portrayal of the City of Lights after its liberation. Paris after the Liberation has captured the imagination like no other Nazi-liberated city (sure, there's "Roma, Citta Aperta", but can any non-Italian mention any intellectual or politician living in Rome in 1944?). Maybe it's because the French are better at self-promotion.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: G. Antony Beevor, Artemis Cooper.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches. D-Day: The Battle for Normandy. Download (EPUB). Читать.

A revised edition of the book to give it the same format and cover look as Antony Beevor's STALINGRAD and BERLIN. Publication in May 2004 will coincide with the 60 th anniversary of the liberation of Paris during the war.
  • Swordsong
Books co-authored by husband and wife teams are not uncommon. The results can be harmonious; in this case they are not. Antony Beevor is a distinguished historian and Artemis Cooper is a well-connected writer of considerable experience. Unfortunately, their contributions to this work do not mesh well. It’s as if two separate books were chopped up and their pieces randomly pasted together.

This is not to say that the resulting jumble is without interest. On the contrary, there is much absorbing material to be found. The liberation of Paris and the months and years that followed were, after all, a unique and unprecedented time and the authors have managed to pack a lot of fascinating information together. But here’s the problem: they leave it to the reader to find a path through the muddle.

Antony Beevor, one must assume, contributed the political and economic sections of the manuscript while Artemis Cooper added the cultural and societal portions. The political parts relay historical events; the cultural lean toward material of a more trifling sort, sometimes merely social events and societal gossip. On the other hand, there are also intriguing portrayals of the friendships, rivalries, and quarrels among famous literary figures such as Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, Arthur Koestler, André Malraux, etc.

Less interesting are the often lengthy lists of lesser known intellectuals, many of whom have long since sunk into obscurity.
These are accompanied by portrayals of the bitter controversies over their wartime activities: was it resistance, collaboration, or some of each?

Artemis Cooper is the granddaughter of Duff Cooper, a politician and aristocrat who was Churchill’s wartime representative to De Gaulle’s Free France and who became ambassador to France in 1944. He was married to the prominent socialite and memoirist Diana Cooper. Artemis’s use of their diaries and letters, adds useful previously unpublished material to the book, though sometimes veering off into quotes taken from letters to figures like Evelyn Waugh and Nancy Mitford with little purpose beyond name dropping.

France has been a deeply fractured nation since the days of the 18th century Revolution. Divisions between left and right, republicans and royalists, Catholics and anti-clericals, are integral to its history. The story continues in the period covered in this work. The war divided those sympathetic to the Vichy regime from those who despised it, from collaborators to the underground resistance.

The split and anger continued in varied forms at war’s end. The struggle was now between the powerful French Communist party and allied unions favorably disposed to Moscow versus Western oriented Gaullists seeking to restore a democratic republic. While the latter won the day, the crevices that divided the nation then continue. French president after French president has struggled to break the stranglehold hard-left unions hold over the economy, each without success. Emmanuel Macron is continuing the effort with the outcome remaining in doubt.
  • Ger
Paris after the liberation tells the history of a dramatic period of the French Republic when the country "should go the psychoanalyst divan" but , instead, try to go ahead with all the problems of the past ( hate to German, defeat. antisemitism, economic crisis, intelectual pride, xenophoby etc ), aggravated by the humiliated years under the Vichy regime. The way this reflects in attitudes of the key persons of the time: De Gaulle, Churchill, Marshall, Truman, Stalin is explored not only in accurate historical texts but with delicious contributions of diaries, letters and memoirs of lost conversations of people that live and work make this book a pleasure to read.
  • Kitaxe
Antony Beevor is simply a marvelous writer, and the ability to use his wife's knowledge and experience really enriches this book. The use of Diana Cooper's father's diaries (and his memoir filled out with the daughter's memories) is a major strength of this account of one of the most fascinating and troubling eras of French history. The book has wonderful variety and richly evocative accounts of many leading figures and events. A joy to read and savor.
  • Snake Rocking
I love Anthony Beevor's writing. I looked forward to this book and rushed through things to get to it. I then read it and read it, when I should have done other things. I finished it in a day where I did very little else. This testifies how Paris After the Liberation is a great and interesting read.

Yet, I think this book is unfocused. Beevor and Cooper really needed to decide whether they were writing a book about the City of Paris in the Liberation and life and events in it, or a history of France from 1944 until 1968. The focus shifts in too many places from goings on and life in the city to the national political alignment in France, international events affecting France, and relations between other countries dealing with France, political events in France outside the city, etc.

Likewise Beevor and Cooper's view of the city of Paris tends to be unbalanced. They focus on the city of tourism and myth rather than the city most Pariseans live in. They give us only a few pages of description of the misery, poverty, disease, starvation, and neglect in the outer working class suburbs. They provie a paragraph about the prison-like experience of workers at Billancourt where Renault is. They have not one word about the working class and poverty-stricken faubourgs inside the city. Instead, Beevor and Cooper concentrate on the life of major intellectuals, upper class socialities, and above all the English-speaking diplomatic circles and returning exiles

If you want to know the details of the life of British Ambassador Duff Cooper, his various extra-maritial affairs, taste in decoration, friendship, advice to French politicians, advice to the British government, this is the book for you. If you want to know what it was like to live in Paris from 1944 until 1952 as an average working class or lower middle class citizen who is not a writer or a painter and who does not socialize at embassies, world class restaurants, or hotels, you need another book. This is about the Paris of public myth,the Paris of politicans and millionares, and not about the Paris that the great bulk of its people lived in and continue to live in.

I think this book would be very hard to understand for someone who does not understand French, is not familiar with the city of Paris, and is not familiar with the array of political, cultural, socialite, and artistic figures that Beevor and Cooper present without explanation.

I speak French, have spent time in Paris not as tourist, and have studied and written about French History and politics for decades. Yet, I found this book both exhilarating and hard to keep up with as names and places whirled past me and had to stop and remember the city's geography. I don't know what someone who can't read French would make of the many statements in French produced with no translation?

One of the interesting aspects of this book is Beevor's use of documents unearthed since the fall of Soviet Union about the French Communist party. In doing so, he provides a good picture of the utter contempt Stalin and his bureacrats had for the working people of France and the world, and Stalin's continued determination to use the PCF not as a tool for social change in France, but as a puppet to secure diplomatic advantages with the imperialist leaders of Europe and the United States.

Beevor and Cooper explain that the PCF began to lose its support in 1944 when it became clear to French workers that the party was not going to lead French workers and farmers to power. Once connections with Moscow were restored and exiled leader Maurice Thorez returned, the PCF organized itself to increase production, "stop strikes," as Thorez was wont to stay, and allowed the peaceful return of French capitalism.

To be sure the PCF remained a major political party, but as Beevor indirectly explained, this was due to middle class intellectuals flocking to the party as workers left. Later in the late 1940s when the PCF aimed at spoiling actions whose purpose was to disrupt the Marshall plan and stiffen France's opposition to the West's plan to build a strong West Germany as a military bulwark against the USSR, the PCF brought about disaster.

What I found the most interesting was Beevor and Cooper's pictures of the lives and intellectual development of Jean Paul Sartre and Simon De Beauvoir, Camus and other Paris intellectuals during these years. Though I think Beevor and Cooper tend to have a bias against De Beauvoir, I would loved to hear more about them and less about the sexual affairs of various English socialities and diplomats.

The final chapters takes the reader through the 1950s and 1960s very quickly. The focus on the city of Paris is really lost, so we don't know anything about the big changes in life and lifestyle, the explosion of new art, film, literature, and politics that happened. As the book goes on and loses focus, inaccuracies unworthy of Beevor and Cooper start to appear. Rather than describing life in Paris, Beevor and Cooper seem to end this book by trying to settle political scores with a generation of the French who were barely born in 1944-1950.

I would have loved a book focused on real life in Paris during these years with the necessary background in French and global politics, a picture of the real city and not just the tourist city. On the other hand, a political history of France from 1944 to 1950 by Beevor and Cooper would have been a wonderful work. Perhaps, a book on the social world of the upper classes, the intellectual elite, and foreign dignataries and diplomats might also be interesting. However, this is the best we've got from Beevor and Cooper on this topic, and it can be enjoyed.

See Paris like a native, not a tourist!
  • Jaiarton
Ok book! Loved all the rest of Beevor's work in his other books. This one had too much French without being interpretated. Expected more information about Vietnam. It did highlight how sorry the Grench are!!! Currently reading After the Occupation: The Brutal Occupation of the Allies which really highlights the duplicity of the French!!!!