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Download Kings and Queens of Early Britain eBook

by Geoffrey Ashe

Download Kings and Queens of Early Britain eBook
ISBN:
0897333470
Author:
Geoffrey Ashe
Category:
Europe
Language:
English
Publisher:
Academy Chicago Pub (June 1, 1990)
Pages:
264 pages
EPUB book:
1661 kb
FB2 book:
1383 kb
DJVU:
1621 kb
Other formats
mobi lit mbr txt
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
454


Start by marking Kings and Queens of Early Britain as Want to Read .

Start by marking Kings and Queens of Early Britain as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

I picked up this book expecting to find some boring interpretation of early Britain as I thought that all of these types of books would be. But I was really interested in the subject matter---and this book made me even more interested. I was introduced to stories I'd never heard before and the book was easy to read for me (I'm in high school). I thoroughly enjoyed it and would recommend this book to anyone interested in early Britain.

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A surgically precise separation of evidence from legend. Published by Thriftbooks. until Athelstan's consolidation of power in 937.

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Kings and Queens of Early Britain. Used books will be clean unsoiled and not stained, all pages and illustrations will be present. Title : Kings and Queens of Early Britain. Condition : Very Good. Product Category : Books.

real or mythical, that are part of the rich tapestry of early history in Britain.

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Geoffrey Thomas Leslie Ashe MBE FRSL (born 29 March 1923) is a British cultural historian and lecturer, known for his focus on King Arthur. Born in London, Ashe spent several years in Canada. He graduated from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, before continuing at Cambridge. Many of his historical books are centred on factual analysis of the Arthurian legend, and the archaeological past of King Arthur, beginning with his King Arthur's Avalon: The Story of Glastonbury, in 1957.

Geoffrey Ashe skillfully weaves all the different accounts, legends, literature, historical documents into one continuous narrative that recreates in intriguing detail all the rulers and events, real or mythical, that are part of the rich tapestry of early history in Britain.
  • caster
Always interesting to read, this is another great book by Ashe. Nice read and interesting, informative without being dry
  • Kigabar
Ashe is one of the best Arthurian scholars of his generation. He is the only one to effective combine primary sources, archeology and historic sources. This book originally written in 1982 he examines what is known about the successor rules followin the list of kings in Geoffroy of Monmouth and the real history following the King Arthur period. The chapters on Arthur are a shorter version of his work in his later work, "The Discovery of King Arthur." Well written, but the reader really needs some understanding of the period to follow the narrative.
  • Kitaxe
I've always enjoyed Geoffrey Ashe's writing. It's scholarly but written in such a way as to be accessible to the general public.
  • Malodor
I picked up this book thinking "Yeah right, it's going to start with the Anglo-Saxon kings, isn't it?" But no, it really does go back and investigate any figures who could be considered kings of Britain, right back into legend and beyond--in fact it doesn't even reach the Arthurian period until about halfway through.

Of course, going back as far as it does, the book focuses for a while on Roman rule, but it's focused on Roman officials in Britain who aspired to be emperor--either of all Rome, Western Rome, or just Britain. The book also spends a good deal of time discussing the early legends--but it carefully distinguishes between what's clearly fiction, what's likely fiction, what's probably or maybe true, and what we just can't be sure of. But the legendary monarchs get their time in the sun, and under a critical eye.

Naturally the book takes a stab at identifying the historical King Arthur, and its choice is at least plausible.

After Arthur we get into some solid history again and the author discusses the more important British (now Welsh) kings, as well as the Anglo-Saxon kings. Toward the end it centers heavily on the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, and walks through the story of how they transitioned to a united kingdom of England, from the early Bretwaldas to final unification following Alfred the Great.

If you want to read a lot about the early kings of Britain and don't mind dipping into the Roman period or seeing some educated guesswork about the early legends, this is well worth your time.
  • Kit
An ideal and captivating quick history of Britain from Julius Caeser's first expedition in 55 B.C. until Athelstan's consolidation of power in 937. This cutoff point seems to be chosen because that is when historical records become more complete, while Ashe prefers to work in the realm where historical records are sketchy or oblique, and must be pieced together with supporting clues from archaeology and legend to fill in a necessarily incomplete picture. Ashe draws heavily from Geoffrey of Monmouth, Nennius, Gildas, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, Bede, and the more dependable Roman records, though always explicitly critical of his sources and lucid in his analysis of how we can draw the kernel of truth out of embellishments or legends. In some cases, such as the pre-Roman British kings listed by Monmouth, the legends are so lacking in support as to be historically hopeless. But where several perspectives exist, even corrupted accounts like Monmouth can be compared with other records to tease out dividends of clues into the reality. The critical view of the evidence and frank analysis leave a rich and fascinating account of almost a thousand years of Picts, Celts, Romans, Anglo-Saxons, and Danes vying for control of the British Isles. A case in point is King Arthur, so buried in legend while so scarce from reliable historical records that uncovering the true history appears impossible, until Ashe navigates confidently through fact and fiction to lay out the most likely possibilities behind the legend. Ashe describes the roles of diplomacy, war, and religion in the constantly shifting tides of political power, gives brief biographical sketches of countless key players, and demonstrates the difference made by remarkable leaders such as Constantine, Maximus, Maelgwn of Gwynedd, Caewlin of Wessex, Saint Aidan, Aldfrith of Northumbria, Kenneth MacAlpine, and of course Alfred the Great. He gives telling insights into the rise of Christianity in the isles despite the resistance in turn of the Romans, Celts, Anglo-Saxons, and Danes. He also emphasises the point that Britain alone of any region in the Empire was granted independence from Rome before the barbarians arrived, which uniquely poised it to maintain a heightened cultural continuity, to the benefit of succeeding eras. I'd been looking for a good, concise history of pre-Alfred Britain, and this turned out to be just right. A fair, even treatment with a brisk, highly readable style.
  • Dusar
I picked up this book expecting to find some boring interpretation of early Britain as I thought that all of these types of books would be. But I was really interested in the subject matter-----and this book made me even more interested. I was introduced to stories I'd never heard before and the book was easy to read for me (I'm in high school). I thoroughly enjoyed it and would recommend this book to anyone interested in early Britain. It offers many different perspectives of the legends while analyzing The History of the Kings of Britain by Geoffrey of Monmouth. "Excellent" isn't even near enough to say!