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Download The Franks (The Peoples of Europe) eBook

by Edward James

Download The Franks (The Peoples of Europe) eBook
ISBN:
0631179364
Author:
Edward James
Category:
Europe
Language:
English
Publisher:
Basil Blackwell; 1st edition (August 26, 1991)
Pages:
264 pages
EPUB book:
1795 kb
FB2 book:
1900 kb
DJVU:
1597 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
903


I was looking forward to read The Franks by Edward James as it is a volume of The Peoples of Europe series that I. .

I was looking forward to read The Franks by Edward James as it is a volume of The Peoples of Europe series that I plan on reading. I was not disappointed. The book focuses almost entirely on the period between the late 5th century, as a "Frankish" identity emerged from what had initially been a federation of smaller tribes, and the 7th century, when that identity became "French". Not coincidentally, this is the period of the Merovingian kings, who conquered, assimilated and were assimilated by the other peoples living in Roman Gaul. The book discusses in depth the history, culture and lifeways of the Franks.

The Franks first come to light in the third century . Edward James wrote this book for a series focusing on 'Peoples of Europe,' and so he frames his argument around different conceptions of what it meant to be a 'Frank' at different periods in French (and Belgian, and German) history. The heart of the book, though, focuses on the Franks from the 4th to the 7th centuries, especially focusing on the Merovingians from Childeric to Dagobert. James does the best he can with the political narrative Interesting read and pretty good overview of the Franks.

The Peoples o f Europe. James Campbell and Barry Cunliffe. The Franks Edward James. The Russians Robin Milner-Gulland. The Mongols David Morgan. A generally accepted definition of the extent of Europe, whilst excluding much of historic Armenia, does include the present-day Republic of Armenia, the boundary between Asia and Europe being regarded as running along the Caucasus. Neither Armenia nor the Armenians how­ ever are routinely associated, by most people, with Europe and Eur­ opeans. as a group of barbarians living in the marshy lowlands of the Rhine frontier of the Roman Empire.

By (author) Edward James. Free delivery worldwide. The Franks first come to light in the third century . By 800 they had become the political heirs of the Romans in the West. Using documentary and archaeological evidence, this book traces the history of the Franks from their barbaric origins to the period of civil and military dominance in Western Europe.

Edward James' The Franks is a succinct record of the evolution of the Franks from one of numerous nomadic barbarians, trough the stages of federated allied barbarian tribe and successor kingdom to the Roman Empire, and ultimately to becoming the core of the country of France. For somebody who knows little about the Dark Ages, this book will be a revelation; if you know just the basics of Western Civiliation, this book will certainly fascinate and educate.

The Franks (Latin: Franci or gens Francorum) were a group of Germanic peoples whose name was first mentioned in 3rd century Roman sources associated with tribes on the Lower and Middle Rhine, on the edge of the Roman Empire. Later the term was associated with Romanized Germanic dynasties within the collapsing Western Roman Empire, who eventually commanded the whole region between the rivers Loire and Rhine.

Frank, member of a Germanic-speaking people who invaded the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century. Dominating present-day northern France, Belgium, and western Germany, the Franks established the most powerful Christian kingdom of early medieval western Europe. The name France (Francia) is derived from their name. Charlemagne: King of the Franks. Charlemagne assumed rulership at a moment when powerful forces of change were affecting his kingdom. By Frankish tradition.

This book is dedicated to the people of America-strong, outspoken, intense in their convictions, sometimes wrong-headed but always generous and brave, with a passion for justice no nation has ever matched. PART ONE ‘A City on a Hill’ Colonial America, 1580-1750.

Unlike the Germanic nations noted above, the Franks did not take possession of this area as a politically unified people.

During that period the term "Frank" assumed different meanings depending on the historical situation. Unlike the Germanic nations noted above, the Franks did not take possession of this area as a politically unified people. Rather, different groups from the "swarm of tribes" that together comprised the Franks slowly penetrated south and west from their original homeland on the right bank of the lower Rhine, a process that was often facilitated by the Roman imperial government.

The Franks first come to light in the third century A.D. as a group of barbarians living in the marshy lowlands of the Rhine frontier of the Roman Empire. By 800 they had become the political heirs of the Romans in the West.
  • Rayli
Pretty good. Not perfect. Doesn't straighten out the historical, archealogical, behavioral and language links between Saxons and Franks and Frisians, which is a major hole in the writing on this field. What are those? Well, I myself could use to know ALOT more about it.

They outright omitted pertinent history of the Salien Franks that bears on their possible origins and how they came to power.

It was worth the money I spent on it, and since I don't have much to spend I don't spend money on books easily.

One thing that was especially valuable was a solid review of who and what the Frankish kings were, which is very different than everything I've ever read before.
  • Questanthr
I was looking forward to read The Franks by Edward James as it is a volume of The Peoples of Europe series that I plan on reading. I was not disappointed. The focus of this book was on the Merovingian Period of Frankish history, which was a big plus since the Carolingians and Charlemagne generally steal the spotlight. While I have a few critiques, overall I was pleased with this book.
Let's start with the few negatives. First, when sources are quoted, only in a few instances are they actually fully cited. Sometimes the author or name of the work is given but then the location of the passage in the stated work is not. A few times no information regarding the quote is given. In a book of over 200 pages with loads of information (a good thing) and source material, there are only twenty-four detailed footnotes. Secondly, while the analysis of cemeteries and burials are important for reconstructing aspects of the Franks, this can become tedious in this volume as it is brought up multiple times in great detail and depth. This is especially true when locations of these archaeological sites/finds are basically brought up and listed and then discussed each in turn. Still, there are many more positives than negatives in this volume.
First of all, the book is of great quality and uses heavy paper. Next, the author provides a great bibliography at the end of the book. In the contents of the book there are many great figures and plates to visually depict or represent many of the points made by the author and some of the images and maps are outstanding. Concerning the writing, the author does a good job trying to make sense of who the Franks were, usually based on meager evidence and source material. He does a fine job at describing what can be explained, but also showing restraint when there are things we simply cannot know, at least for now, and doesn't care to speculate beyond reason. He strikes a great balance between a political historical narrative and the social and economic facets of Frankish society. In regards to the political narrative, the author does well in trying to tease out the chronology of what happened in a very chaotic era full of political machinations. Lastly, I felt that the author was best at pointing out the futility of trying to determine what was technically "Gallic," "Roman," "Germanic," "Gallo-Roman," "Frankish," etc. While some general assumptions can be made, it is not easy to draw fine lines with these terms as previous historians had done (many times for ethnic/national reasons.) What was more important was that Merovingian or Frankish culture was, in essence, its own unique blend. He establishes this point throughout the book and lets the reader know up front on how "the Franks" really doesn't have an absolute meaning anyways (page 9.) He ends the book with an excellent section on the "Frankish Myth" and how other groups have either embraced or avoided associating themselves with the Franks throughout history down to our own day in modern France and Germany.
Overall I found this volume an excellent read and I will look for more books by the author, Edward James, as well as check out other books in the Peoples of Europe series.
4.5 out of 5 stars.
  • Bev
First rate, accesible survey of the history and culture of the Franks. The book focuses almost entirely on the period between the late 5th century, as a "Frankish" identity emerged from what had initially been a federation of smaller tribes, and the 7th century, when that identity became "French". Not coincidentally, this is the period of the Merovingian kings, who conquered, assimilated and were assimilated by the other peoples living in Roman Gaul. The book discusses in depth the history, culture and lifeways of the Franks. It cautiously notes the paucity of reliable historical sources and the ambiguous nature of much of the archaeology of this time and place; one gets the impression that this caution stems from the unjustified certainty of much of the older scholarship of the period. The book will appeal to the historian, the archeologist and the interested lay person, and is a superb contribution to the study of ethnogenesis. Highly recommended.
  • just one girl
Informative, scholarly, yet written with a sense of humor. I'll never look at the contents of graves the same way. And he liberated me from what I was taught in high school: that the Church magically kept civilization alive while barbarians destroyed all that was left of the Roman Empire.
  • misery
In my family research I have found not just French ancestry, but Frankish. This book looked to be a good launching point, and at first glance, I made a good choice.

BTW, kudos to the vendor, book arrived in better than advertised condition and quicker than initial shipping estimate.
  • Dorizius
It's informative but a bit scholarly. More maps with current location overlays would have been helpful as well.
  • Watikalate
Of all the "barbarian" Germanic peoples who migrated south and west across the Empire over a period of five centuries, the Franks were the most successful. They acquired the most territory, influenced other peoples the most, and retained much of their identity in the process. This was largely because they were highly adaptable and generally tolerant of the customs and beliefs of others. Edwards is a recognized expert in early medieval history and archaeology, and a very readable writer as well. The essential question about the Franks -- and it arises again and again in this book -- is, "Who were they?" Or better, "How do we define a Frank?" They were so inclusive, it's difficult to tell. James discusses the surviving sources, then delves into their origins and their movements before Clovis. Then come the periods of conquest and unification, the effect on language and material culture, and the conversion of the Franks to Christianity, with several excellent discussions of monasticism, royal burials, and Church politics. The last two sections deal with the relationship between the Merovingian kings and their people (administration, taxation, coinage, and so on) and Frankish society. Finally, there's a short discussion of the "Frankish myth" as it has appeared in France for the past thousand years. The bibliography is highly selective, of course, but still a good starting point. I can recommend this as an excellent primer for the student approaching Frankish history (or even early medieval history) for the first time.