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Download Names and Naming Patterns in England 1538-1700 (Oxford Historical Monographs) eBook

by Scott Smith-Bannister

Download Names and Naming Patterns in England 1538-1700 (Oxford Historical Monographs) eBook
ISBN:
0198206631
Author:
Scott Smith-Bannister
Category:
Europe
Language:
English
Publisher:
Clarendon Press; 1 edition (October 2, 1997)
Pages:
240 pages
EPUB book:
1186 kb
FB2 book:
1649 kb
DJVU:
1571 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
720


Names and Naming Patterns. has been added to your Cart. Scott Smith-Bannister is a Head of History Department at Papplewick School, Ascot.

Names and Naming Patterns. Series: Oxford Historical Monographs.

Smith-Bannister, Scott. Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press. Names - England - History, Names, Personal - England - History - 16th century, Names, Personal - England - History - 17th century, Names, Personal - England - History - 18th century. Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books.

Oxford Historical Monographs. Scott Smith-Bannister, Head of History Department, Papplewick School, Ascot. Names and Naming Patterns in England 1538-1700. Scott Smith-Bannister. Oxford Historical Monographs. Smith-Bannister obliges with the pioneering large-scale and thorough examination of personal naming practices in early modern England. Smith-Bannister has produced the evidence to bring name giving beliefs more in line with the facts. Bibliotheque d'Humanism et Renaissance.

Home Browse Books Book details, Names and Naming Patterns in England, 1538-1700. This is a study of names given to children born in England between 1538 and 1700. Names and Naming Patterns in England, 1538-1700. By Scott Smith-Bannister. Drawing on statistical data from forty English parishes, Scott looks at the most commonly used names, how children came to be given these names, why they were often named after their godparents and parents, and how social status affected the names chosen.

Scott Smith-Bannister. This book contains the results of the first large-scale quantitative investigation of naming practices in early modern England. It traces the history of the fundamentally significant human act of naming one's children during a period of great economic, social, and religious upheaval More

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Your name Please enter your name. New York: Oxford University Press. Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press. 0198206631,0198206631. This item appears on. List: Names and Identities (ENGL2012) (Q32208).

Scott Smith-Bannister traces the history of the fundamentally significant human act of naming one's children during a period of great economic, social, and religiousupheaval

Scott Smith-Bannister traces the history of the fundamentally significant human act of naming one's children during a period of great economic, social, and religiousupheaval Names and Naming Patterns in England, 1538-1700.

Scott Smith-Bannister traces the history of the fundamentally significant human act of naming one's children during a period of great economic, social, and religiousupheaval

Scott Smith-Bannister traces the history of the fundamentally significant human act of naming one's children during a period of great economic, social, and religiousupheaval lies in the discovery of a substantial shift in naming practices in this period: away from medieval patterns of naming a child after a godparent and towards naming them after a parent. In establishing the chronology of how parents came to exercisegreater choice in naming their children and over the nature of naming practices, it successfully supersedes previous scholarship on this subject.

This is a study of names given to children born in England between 1538 and 1700. Drawing on statistical data from forty English parishes, Scott looks at the most commonly used names, how children came to be given these names, why they were often named after their godparents and parents, and how social status affected the names chosen.