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Download History Of The Royal Irish Regiment Of Artillery: History Of The Royal Irish Regiment Of Artillery eBook

by Maj J. J. Crooks

Download History Of The Royal Irish Regiment Of Artillery: History Of The Royal Irish Regiment Of Artillery eBook
ISBN:
1845741730
Author:
Maj J. J. Crooks
Category:
Europe
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval and Military Press (February 13, 2009)
Pages:
380 pages
EPUB book:
1491 kb
FB2 book:
1275 kb
DJVU:
1918 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
762


The Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling), 83rd and 87th and Ulster Defence Regiment) (R IRISH) is an infantry regiment of the British Army.

The Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling), 83rd and 87th and Ulster Defence Regiment) (R IRISH) is an infantry regiment of the British Army. The regiment was founded in 1992 through the amalgamation of the Royal Irish Rangers and the Ulster Defence Regiment. Their oldest predecessor; the 27th Regiment of Foot; was first raised in June 1689 to fight in the Williamite War in Ireland.

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The formation of a battalion of Artillery on the Irish establishment was not contemplated until the year 1755, when, on the requisition of the Lord-Lieutenant, a party of twenty-four non-commissioned officers and men of the Royal Artillery, under the command of a First Lieutenant, left.

The formation of a battalion of Artillery on the Irish establishment was not contemplated until the year 1755, when, on the requisition of the Lord-Lieutenant, a party of twenty-four non-commissioned officers and men of the Royal Artillery, under the command of a First Lieutenant, left Woolwich for Dublin, for that purpose. This detachment, having received considerable augmentation and a special organization, was in the following year styled "The Artillery Company in Ireland," the commissions of the officers being dated the 1st of April, 1756.

The story of the Royal Irish Artillery from its formation in 1756 to 1801 when it was absorbed into the Royal Artillery with the main emphasis on regimental details including nominal rolls of officers, strength returns.

The story of the Royal Irish Artillery from its formation in 1756 to 1801 when it was absorbed into the Royal Artillery with the main emphasis on regimental details including nominal rolls of officers, strength returns, pay and dress details. Choose an option Softback Hardback. HISTORY OF THE Royal Irish Regiment of Artillery quantity.

The Royal Regiment of Artillery, commonly referred to as the Royal Artillery (RA) and colloquially known as "The Gunners", is the artillery arm of the British Army. The Royal Regiment of Artillery comprises thirteen Regular Army regiments, King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery and five Army Reserve regiments. Artillery was used by the English army as early as the Battle of Crécy in 1346, while Henry VIII established it as a semi-permanent function in the 16th century

On completion of which the plates were destroyed.

On completion of which the plates were destroyed. Filmed from a copy of the original publication held by the Library of the Public Archives of Canada.

In the House of Commons, on the 22nd of February, 1872, the Secretary of State for War rose to move the Army Estimates for the ensuing year. These included provision for a Regiment of Artillery, numbering – including those serving in India – 34,943 officers, non-commissioned officers, and men. Although divided into Horse, Field, and Garrison Artillery, and including no less than twenty-nine Brigades, besides a large Depôt, this large force, representing the permanent Artillery Force of Great Britain, was one vast regiment – the Royal Regiment of Artillery.

In 1687 a Royal Warrant was issued for the establishment of an Office of Ordnance and Train of Artillery in Ireland, which had a staff of only 40 distributed among several garrisons, but Ireland lacked its own specialist Artillery Corps. Furthermore, down to 1755 no Irishman whatsoever was allowed to be enlisted for the Army serving in Ireland - a consequence of the Test Act of 1673, directed against Catholics which, among other things, permitted recruiting for the Army on the Irish Establishment only from English Protestants. In February 1756 this was amended to include Protestants from the Province of Ulster. On 1 April 1756 the Train of Artillery was expanded to a company and further increased in 1760 to four companies and designated a regiment with the full title The Royal Irish Regiment of Artillery with the Earl of Kildare as its first Colonel in Chief. By 1800 the Royal Irish Artillery had reached its high point of twenty Marching Companies and an Invalid Company with a total strength of 2,132 men. After the Act of Union in 1801 the regiment was absorbed into the Royal Regiment of Artillery as the 7th Battalion RA.'During its forty years as an independent regiment the Royal Irish Artillery saw its fair share of action, either as a unit or in supplying volunteers to the Royal Artillery units overseas. Volunteers fought in RA batteries during the American War of Independence; they were in action in Flanders in 1794 and in the West Indies in 1795 when yellow fever killed more than the French: out of 11 officers and 288 other ranks only 4 officers and 43 men survived. Back home they were engaged in several engagements in the Irish Rebellion of 1798. But the main focus of the book is on domestic aspects, and to this end there are numerous tables giving strength returns, establishment details, pay, recruiting figures and dress. There is the succession of Colonels, the roll of officers who entered the Royal Irish Artillery from 1756 to 1801, giving dates of entry and rank, the rank attained afterwards, dates of retirement or leaving the Regiment or death; and finally there is the list of officers who transferred to the Royal Artillery in April 1801 with details of their service.