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Download The Pilgrimage of Grace: The Rebellion That Shook Henry VIII's Throne eBook

by Geoffrey Moorhouse

Download The Pilgrimage of Grace: The Rebellion That Shook Henry VIII's Throne eBook
ISBN:
1842126660
Author:
Geoffrey Moorhouse
Category:
Europe
Language:
English
Publisher:
Phoenix (July 1, 2003)
Pages:
432 pages
EPUB book:
1871 kb
FB2 book:
1871 kb
DJVU:
1598 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
153


The Pilgrimage of Grace members had different grievances depending on which area they came from, but common to all were Henry's breach with the Papacy, his attack on the Roman church and traditions, liturgies, and the dissolution of the monasteries, taking their wealth for the crown.

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Geoffrey Moorhouse, FRGS, FRSL, . itt. His book To The Frontier won the Thomas Cook Award for the best travel book of its year in 1984. The Pilgrimage of Grace, 1536-7: The Rebellion That Shook Henry VIII's Throne (Phoenix, 2003). 29 November 1931 – 26 November 2009) was an English journalist and author. He was born Geoffrey Heald in Bolton and took his stepfather's surname. He had recently concentrated on Tudor history, with The Pilgrimage of Grace and Great Harry's Navy. He lived in a hill village in North Yorkshire  .

The Pilgrimage of Grace was a popular uprising that began in Yorkshire in October 1536, before spreading to other parts of. .Geoffrey Moorhouse The Pilgrimage of Grace: The Rebellion That Shook Henry VIII's Throne.

The Pilgrimage of Grace was a popular uprising that began in Yorkshire in October 1536, before spreading to other parts of Northern England including Cumberland, Northumberland and north Lancashire, under the leadership of lawyer Robert Aske  .

Alone among Tudor rebellions, the Pilgrimage of Grace has lost its name of rebellion, keeping the resonant name .

Alone among Tudor rebellions, the Pilgrimage of Grace has lost its name of rebellion, keeping the resonant name of "Pilgrimage", coined by Robert Aske. Of course, certain other Tudor rebellions are also not so named, but that is because they succeeded. Consider some Tudor treasons which prospered: Henry VII won his throne at the Battle of Bosworth from Richard III, there was a great popular tax strike against Henry VIII in 1525, the Lord Protector for the little boy-king Edward VI was sidelined in 1549. 1536 nearly added another event to the list.

Book DescriptionDuring the Pilgrimage of Grace for a short time Henry VIII lost control of the North of England and there was a very real possibly of civil war. Protesting the king's betrayal of the 'old' religion, his new taxes, and his threat to the rights of landowners - the poor and the powerful united against their king and his henchman Thomas Cromwell, raising an army of 40,000. The leader of the Pilgrimage was the charismatic, heroic figure of Robert Aske, a lawyer.

Pilgrimage of Grace : The Rebellion That Shook Henry VIII's Throne. by Geoffrey Moorhouse.

item 2 The Pilgrimage of Grace: The Rebellion that .Geoffrey Moorhouse is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. His TO THE FRONTIER won the Thomas Cook Award for the best travel book of its year in 1984.by Moorhouse, Geoffrey Hardback. Last oneFree postage. He lives in a hill village in North Yorkshire. Country of Publication.

Items related to The Pilgrimage of Grace: The .

Items related to The Pilgrimage of Grace: The Rebellion That Shook Henry. Moorhouse, Geoffrey The Pilgrimage of Grace: The Rebellion That Shook Henry VIII's Throne. ISBN 13: 9780297643937. Geoffrey Moorhouse is ‘one of the best writers of our time’ (Byron Rogers, The Times), ‘a brilliant historian’ (Dirk Bogarde, Daily Telegraph) and ‘a writer whose gifts are beyond category’ (Jan Morris, Independent on Sunday).

The rebellion started in protest against Henry VIII's dissolution of the . Moorehouse, Geoffrey. Pilgrimage of Grace: The Rebellion That Shook Henry VIII's Throne. London: Phoenix Press, 2003.

The rebellion started in protest against Henry VIII's dissolution of the monasteries. It was headed by Robert Aske. Books for further study: Bernard, G. W. The King's Reformation: Henry VIII And the Remaking of the English Church. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2007. The Pilgrimage of Grace: A Study of the Rebel Armies of October 1536. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1996. The Pilgrimage of Grace on the Web: The Pilgrimage of Grace - TudorPlace.

Protesting the king's betrayal of the "old" religion, his new taxes, and his threat to the rights of landowners,  the poor and the powerful united against Henry VIII, raising an army of 40,000. Under the influence of the charismatic, heroic figure of Robert Aske, most of the Northern nobility joined the rebellion and gathered for battle at Doncaster where they would have outnumbered the king's soldiers by 4 to 1. But Aske was persuaded by the king's men to abandon military force and negotiate terms in London. Once there he was arrested, charged with treason and hanged in chains.
  • Rivik
Definitely not a book for readers wanting something quick, Pilgrimage of Grace is, nonetheless, an interesting look at events transpiring during the years 1536 to 1537 which could have seriously cost Henry VIII his reign. Commoners and gentry, along with some noblemen united in a series of uprisings against the policies of stripping the monasteries, but more because of their great dislike of Thomas Cromwell, along with other prelates they considered as "heretical." There were other reasons as well, largely monetary and political in nature that caused angry mobs to join together to try to effect change. In most cases, the uprising grew as those who led the movement forced others into joining, until thousands of armed men stood against poorly-maintained, poorly paid and often sympathetically-minded troops under the command of the officials sent to quash the rebellion. It was the job of different dukes to maintain order, and in this case, the work fell to the Duke of Norfolk and for the first, smaller rebellion in Lincolnshire, the Duke of Suffolk.

The author does an excellent job with primary sources, often noting the bias in many of the accounts of the time, depending on authorship. He has woven together an outstanding look at causes, events and effects of these uprisings, examining not only the changes in the church under Henry VIII, but economic and political factors as well. He portrays Henry VIII as a monarch with a penchant for revenge and a monstrous temperament. At the end of the book he poses the question of what would have happened had the rebels not stopped their activities when and where they did, offering food for further thought.

This is definitely not a book for general readership -- you pretty much have to decide you're in it for the long haul to finish it -- but it is a very well-written history of the time. I'd recommend it to people who enjoy a good history, and those who want to know more about the reign of Henry VIII. Highly recommended.
  • DrayLOVE
Thank you, arrived quickly, perfect book. Just as stated.
  • great ant
Sad sad work.
  • FLIDER
A brilliant account of a pivotal moment in the cultural history of England, taken mainly from local accounts and records. Goes into an extraordinary level of detail without bogging down, remaining readable and interesting all the way through.
  • Domarivip
Geoffrey Moorhouse's excellent account of The Pilgrimage of Grace, an uprising of members of the common folk and some members of the gentry in 1536-37, gave King Henry VIII cause for nightmares and alarm that he could be unseated.

The Pilgrimage of Grace members had different grievances depending on which area they came from , but common to all were Henry's breach with the Papacy, his attack on the Roman church and traditions, liturgies, and the dissolution of the monasteries, taking their wealth for the crown. In some areas taxation was the main reason and others felt that Parliament's decisions were good for Henry, but not the people. Overriding it all, though, was the people's desire for the old religion back again. By the time men had joined and had taken the oath that Chief Captain, Robert Aske, wrote there were 40,000 men in the Pilgrimage, outnumbering Henry's army by more than 2 to 1.

This is a comprehensive account on the subject which doesn't get a lot of mention in Henry VIII'S biographies. It is a long and tedious read which can't be rushed through. The author provides a list of "Principal Characters" that is helpful because there are a lot. Several maps throughout the book help with geographical locations of events. It was a complicated series of uprisings that had men against the king and also Cromwell. These brave men deserve to have their grievances known and understood, because going against Henry VIII was no small feat. Moorhouse has done an exceptional job.