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Download A History of English: Volume I: From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic (A Linguistic History of English) (v. 1) eBook

by Donald Ringe

Download A History of English: Volume I: From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic (A Linguistic History of English) (v. 1) eBook
ISBN:
019928413X
Author:
Donald Ringe
Category:
Europe
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (November 9, 2006)
Pages:
366 pages
EPUB book:
1646 kb
FB2 book:
1762 kb
DJVU:
1712 kb
Other formats
mbr mobi azw lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
765


Request PDF A History of English: From Proto-Indo-European to. .This is the first volume of a linguistic history of English

Request PDF A History of English: From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic This volume traces the prehistory of English from Proto-Indo-European, its earliest reconstructable ancestor, to Proto-Germanic, the latest. This is the first volume of a linguistic history of English. It is written for fellow-linguists who are not specialists in historical linguistics, especially for theoretical linguists.

A Linguistic History of English, Volume I is the first book of a planned comprehensive series on the history .

Series: A Linguistic History of English (Book 1). Hardcover: 366 pages . Publisher: Oxford University Press (November 9, 2006). This first volume, written by Don Ringe, is titled FROM PROTO-INDO-EUROPEAN TO PROTO-GERMANIC, and covers over its four hundred pages two reconstructable ancestors of English. While the series as a whole may interest a different crowd or crowds, this first volume is a major event for Indo-Europeanists. Ringe presents a complete view of Proto-Indo-European according to the current consensus of scholars, surpassing the other, more dated handbooks on the market.

A History of English: Volume I: From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic (A Linguistic History of English). Download (pdf, . 7 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

A Linguistic History of English book. The first volume in Don Ringe's A Linguistic This book is the first since 1897 to describe the earliest reconstructable stages of the prehistory of English

A Linguistic History of English book. The first volume in Don Ringe's A Linguistic This book is the first since 1897 to describe the earliest reconstructable stages of the prehistory of English.

This volume traces the prehistory of English from Proto-Indo-European, its earliest reconstructable ancestor . The final chapter presents a grammatical sketch of Proto-Germanic

It begins with a grammatical sketch of Proto-Indo-European, then discusses in detail the linguistic changes - especially in phonology and morphology - that occurred in the development to Proto-Germanic. The final chapter presents a grammatical sketch of Proto-Germanic.

From Proto-IndoEuropean to Proto-Germanic DON RINGE

From Proto-IndoEuropean to Proto-Germanic DON RINGE.

Although this is convenient, it makes it unnecessarily hard to locate. Similarly, the same subject may be broached in more than part of a chapter (. once in the vowel section, once in the consonant section, and once in the morphology section).

Items related to A History of English: Volume I: From . The first volume in Don Ringe's A Linguistic History of English will be of central interest to all scholars and students of comparative Indo-European.

Items related to A History of English: Volume I: From Proto-Indo-European. This book is the first since 1897 to describe the earliest reconstructable stages of the prehistory of English. The first volume in Don Ringe's A Linguistic History of English will be of central interest to all scholars and students of comparative Indo-European and Germanic linguistics, the history of English, and historical linguists. The next volume will consider the development of Proto-Germanic into Old English.

This book describes the earliest reconstructable stages of the prehistory of.Subsequent volumes will describe the attested history of English from th.

This book describes the earliest reconstructable stages of the prehistory of English. The focus throughout the book is on linguistic structure. Subsequent volumes will describe the attested history of English from the Anglo-Saxon era to the present.

This book is the first since 1897 to describe the earliest reconstructable stages of the prehistory of English. It outlines the grammar of Proto-Indo-European, considers the changes by which one dialect of that prehistoric language developed into Proto-Germanic, and provides a detailed account of the grammar of Proto-Germanic. The first volume in Don Ringe's A Linguistic History of English will be of central interest to all scholars and students of comparative Indo-European and Germanic linguistics, the history of English, and historical linguists. The next volume will consider the development of Proto-Germanic into Old English. Subsequent volumes will describe the attested history of English from the Old English period to the present.
  • Lavivan
This review is not about the content, only about the digital edition.

The page numbers were not transferred and are not searchable!

This means it's impossible to find a page referenced from another publication.

Worse, the indexes at the end are not active, and give page numbers. So the indexes are useless.

The footnotes are not well implemented either. The notes are at the end of the book, with numbering reset at the beginning of each part. However, there's no part indication with each note. It's just 1, 3, 2, 4, ...8, 1, 2, 3, ..., 12, 1, 2, 3, ..., 19. One can click the numeral in the text to go to the note and return with the back arrow, but there's not way to go directly from the note to the relevant text. And note 2 in part 2 isn't active, so can't be clicked.

Now to find out Amazon's return policy. Good. Returnable within 7 days for refund.
  • TheSuspect
Ringe, professor of linguistics at U Penn., has achieved in the 300 pages of main text a welcome, lucid and compact examination (considering the complexities of the subject) of the development of Proto-Germanic (PG) from Proto-Indo-European (PIE). The first volume in the projected Linguistic History of English, Ringe's work launches the series quite effectively. Significantly influenced by the work of the late Warren Cowgill of Yale, Ringe offers a synthesis of contemporary understandings and well-supported reconstructions, notably in the areas of PIE and PG accent, nominal inflection and ablaut, verbal aspect, and details of some 40 phonological changes underlying these (particularly the eventual elimination of laryngeals) in the emergence of PG. More precisely, Ringe distinguishes between PIE proper, which includes Anatolian, principally represented by Hittite, and (North) Indo-European, which includes the outlier Tocharian. The general linguistics audience is well served by this book in seeking to identify the consensus views on PIE and PG. Where Ringe suggests any steps away from the mainstream, he explains his thinking with carefully reasoned and well-supported speculation; for me these instances constitute some of the most intriguing parts of his book. While acknowledging the lack of a current etymological dictionary of PIE, Ringe supplies a base PIE vocabulary of several hundred items with which to illustrate this diachronic study. Roughly the first quarter of the book treats PIE, leaving the remaining three-quarters to address PG specifically. In his introduction Ringe notes he presupposes a fair amount of prior linguistic knowledge "in order to keep the work within reasonable bounds": a basic grounding in modern linguistics, a general knowledge of phonology, morphology and traditional historical linguistics, and some familiarity with at least one older PIE language. He also notes that due to space constraints he does not "cite full evidence for the standard reconstructions offered here," directing interested readers to other texts which can supply ample documentation. Not surprisingly, a respect for established phonological law underpins his text and its examples: "since investigation of historically documented languages shows that sound change is overwhelmingly regular in statistical terms, it is a serious breach of the uniformitarian principle not to assume the same for prehistory." A somewhat less expensive paperback is due to be published early in 09. Till then, your neighborhood university or interlibrary loan is your best friend, unless you specialize in PIE studies and decide this is a must-have. Rein in that hopeless book lust till you're sure.
  • Topmen
Having a conversation with Don Ringe has been described as "trying to take a drink from a firehose", surely he gives you WAY too much information in what should be a dull and technical book on principles well established in the 19th c., but that is what makes this such a worth-while read for any professor, student, teacher of classics, linguistics, or English herself.
  • Thorgaginn
"Therefore, something must be wrong with the Germanic Consonant Shift. That wrong thing cannot possibly be sought at the Germanic end because the phonetic equation (Lat `pater'= Goth. Fadar, Lat tria=Goth prija, Lat. Card=Goth hairt etc. etc.) that led to the conception of Grimm's Law in the first place are unimpeachable. We have to conduct our investigation at the Proto-Aryan (P-A) end (Gessman 1990, p. 6)."

"It can be safely assumed that these migrating tribes did not represent large armies who overwhelmed the original inhabitants by the sheer force of their numbers but were smallish bands who conquered their new homes by their superiority in battle. Those original inhabitants--undoubtedly greatly superior in numbers--saw themselves forced to learn the respective languages (or still dialects of the Aryan conquerors. It is difficult to see how one can doubt that these substrata modified the newly acquired languages, and it stands to reason to assume that influences from vastly different substrata were one of the main causes for the conspicuous differentiation of the Aryan languages in even their most ancient known forms (Gessman 1990, p. 10)."

"Whichever the development may have been, we can see one thing clearly. Grimm's Law, the `Germanic Consonant Shift," has evaporated. The Proto-Aryan basis on which it had been predicated has vanished (Gessman 1990, p.12)."

Gessman, A. M. (1990). Grimm's law: fact of myth. Language Quarterly, 28:3-4, pp. 2-16.

"We (Caflisch) can agree with G (Gessman 1990) that the aspirated segments cannot be found in other branches, but that Dravidian languages even today in central and southern India have them; and some of these, e.g. Kannada, have retroflexed T-series [t, d, n], etc. After all, perhaps the vaunted romanticism of the Leipzig linguists should have included retroflex ion in their scheme for the I.E. segment inventory, but they did not. Connected with G's eight point (6) is the discussion relevant to possible vs. impossible phonological paradigmata.
The ninth point suggests a * P. I.E. (= G's "Proto-Aryan") pharyngeal series in the segment matrix; however I (Caflisch) claim a glottal zed series proposed also by other scholars such as A. R. Bomhard (1977), P. Hopper (1977), T. V. Gamkreldize (1975), and L. Hammerich (1967). One reason for glottalization is rather simple: it can apply only to voiceless segments which will mean that we can conveniently ||p|| on both physiological and typological grounds.
Also assumed under the rubric of this ninth point is G's long-held opinion that the substratum contamination (I prefer to call it cross-contamination or bilateral contamination) between *P. I.E. and *P. S. (Proto-Semitic) was most assuredly in force. In this connection Levin (1971) ought to be consulted and taken seriously. Could Hittite have been a quasi "buffer" culture between *I.E. (Hittite, despite G's claims about its amalgam status, continues to be recognized as *I.E. in structure.) and Semitic? After, all, Slavs were used by the Roman empire as a buffer culture (a "shock strip") between the latter and the threatening eastern nomadic tribes (Caflisch 1990, p. 19)."
"I (Caflisch) agree with G that, most assuredly. Languages are very easily contaminated through contacts, and even half-hearted acculturation (a kind of "passive acculturation" where speakers lack full motivation to assimilate within a cultural base) within G's substratum and superstratum complexes allows for it to lesser degree (Caflisch 1990, p.21)."
"In summarizing Gessman's article, I (Caflisch) point to several ideas which are indeed crucial to his arguments. Fist G, makes the bold claim against the interpretation of any cycle in Grimm's Law, without dismissing the actual linear changes that have occurred. G's longstanding theory of superstrata, adstrata, and substrata in language contacts and their subsequent tendencies toward contamination phenomena is indeed well taken here (Caflisch 1990, p. 24)."

Caflisch, J., Sr. (1990). Grimm's law revisited: a case for natural, typological phonology. Language Quarterly, 28 (3-4), pp. 17-28).