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Download The Story of Britain: From the Romans to the Present: A Narrative History eBook

by Rebecca Fraser

Download The Story of Britain: From the Romans to the Present: A Narrative History eBook
ISBN:
0393060101
Author:
Rebecca Fraser
Category:
Europe
Language:
English
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company (April 17, 2005)
Pages:
829 pages
EPUB book:
1911 kb
FB2 book:
1220 kb
DJVU:
1969 kb
Other formats
mbr doc mobi lit
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
660


Rebecca Fraser the author of "The Story of Britain" is the daughter of famed historian Lady Antonia Fraser. Rebecca continues the excellent tradition of her mother by this 785 page behemoth of a book.

Rebecca Fraser the author of "The Story of Britain" is the daughter of famed historian Lady Antonia Fraser. In these closely printed pages Fraser unfolds the pageantry, poetry, politics and personalities that have made GB the oldest democracy in the world. Fraser has divided her book up by reporting in concise prose the history of each monarch's reign

The Story of Britain book. Ever since Caractacus and Boudicca surprised the Romans with the bravery of their resistance, Britain has stood out as the home of freedom.

The Story of Britain book. From Thomas More to William Wilberforce, from Gladstone to Churchill, Britain's history is studded with heroic figures who have resisted tyranny in all its guises, whether it be the Stuart kings' belief in divine right, the institution of slavery, or the ambitions of Napoleon and Hitler.

The story of britain. From the Romans to the Present: A Narrative History. The story of Britain : from the Romans to the present : a narrative history, Rebecca Fraser

The story of britain. W. Norton & Company. Originally published in Great Britain under the title A People’s History of Britain. The story of Britain : from the Romans to the present : a narrative history, Rebecca Fraser. 1st American ed. p. cm. Originally published in Great Britain under the title A People’s history of Britain -. Includes bibliographical references.

But the son who inherited the throne had none of his father’s strategic skills nor the English Justinian’s serious-mindedness. As might have been expected with such a father, Edward II had been well. educated in warfare and kingship, but his character remained incurably frivolous. Although his reign lasted twenty years, he reigned rather than ruled, and early on lost the battle for power. Edward II was twenty-three years old when he came to the throne

Rebecca Fraser's dramatic portrayal of the scientists, statesmen, explorers, soldiers, traders, and artists who forged Britain's .

Rebecca Fraser's dramatic portrayal of the scientists, statesmen, explorers, soldiers, traders, and artists who forged Britain's national institutions is the perfect introduction to British history. Just as much as kings and queens, battles and empire, Britain's great themes have been the liberty of the individual, the rule of law, and the parliamentary democracy invented to protect them.

Originally published in Great Britain under the title A People's history of Britain-T. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads.

Rebecca Fraser's dramatic portrayal of the scientists, statesmen, explorers, soldiers, traders, and artists who .

The Story of Britain is an excellent popular history of Great Britain. It is written as a chronological narrative, and is a good general history of Britain

The Story of Britain is an excellent popular history of Great Britain. com User, September 10, 2007. Rebecca Fraser the author of "The Story of Britain" is the daughter of famed historian Lady Antonia Fraser. I truly enjoyed Rebecca Fraser's history of Britain and give it my highest recommendation. She covers 2000 years of history in 750 pages, discussing all the kings, prime ministers, parliamentary issues, and civil wars in a thoroughly readable fashion. It is written as a chronological narrative, and is a good general history of Britain. It explores not only the personalities that lived the history, but tells about how English culture was brought about.

Fraser intends simply to "guide the average person through the confusing shoals of disputed facts," and many an average reader (and student) will warm to her self-consciously old-fashioned narration.

“A beautifully written story, a box of delights, a treasure trove: final proof of truth’s superiority over fiction.”―Andrew Roberts

A sparkling anecdotal account with the pace of an epic, about the men and women who created turning points in history. Rebecca Fraser's dramatic portrayal of the scientists, statesmen, explorers, soldiers, traders, and artists who forged Britain's national institutions is the perfect introduction to British history. Just as much as kings and queens, battles and empire, Britain's great themes have been the liberty of the individual, the rule of law, and the parliamentary democracy invented to protect them. Ever since Caractacus and Boudicca surprised the Romans with the bravery of their resistance, Britain has stood out as the home of freedom. From Thomas More to William Wilberforce, from Gladstone to Churchill, Britain's history is studded with heroic figures who have resisted tyranny in all its guises, whether it be the Stuart kings' belief in divine right, the institution of slavery, or the ambitions of Napoleon and Hitler. 154 illustrations
  • Adoranin
A good, fast read in preparation for travels in England. Lots of great stories anchored to the sites where they occurred. Narrative quality is good story telling. Rebecca Fraser is a good writer, albeit she has her favorite areas she expands on, it is all entertaining and highly informative. I studied English history in College where the books were as dry as the parchment they were transcribed from. Not the case with The Story of Britain. As a trained linguist I appreciate her attention to the transformations of language from Roman, Anglo Saxon, Dane and on. These efforts offer understanding to names that carry such portions as "Shire." In addition, one cannot read the history of Britain without reference to the arts and great poems and literature. Fraser also creates a fine list of artifacts to visit in each period that expands the quality of any trip to Britain.
  • Ylonean
A good read, though it could have been twice as long since so much information (twenty centuries worth) is covered in the book. Fraser is a good, capable writer. Her tales of Britain are well detailed and often amusing. I learned a great deal reading this book. All of the monarchs are touched on, some more than others. The peoples of the Island are described well and their developments are displayed with deftness and compassion. It is a well done work of history that is exciting most of the time and seldom leads to boredom.
  • X-MEN
Obviously, you can't write a 700 page book about the history of Great Britain and have it go back 2000 years and be incredibly detailed...that can't be. But, the author does a very good job of distilling the information and going along with the flow and if you're not terribly well versed in all things British history, it's a good primer. Once we got to Queen Victoria's era and moving forward, I could see where the book's deficiencies lie; the brevity necessitated by covering so much ground made it clear that we were painting in broad strokes. I certainly have a much better since of British history from the late 1800s onward and that's when I realized how compacted the information was...and had to be.

But, for me, who didn't know my British history back to 1066 (and before!), it was a good investment of my time!
  • Dellevar
Rebecca Fraser the author of "The Story of Britain" is the daughter of famed historian Lady Antonia Fraser. Rebecca continues the excellent tradition of her mother by this 785 page behemoth of a book. In these closely printed pages Fraser unfolds the pageantry, poetry, politics and personalities that have made GB the oldest democracy in the world.
Fraser has divided her book up by reporting in concise prose the history of each monarch's reign. She covers all the kings and queens from Roman times to the long reign of the present Queen Elizabeth II.
The sections are:
1. Norman and Angevin: 1066-1216
2. Plantagenet: 1216-1399.
3. Lancastrian and Yorkist-1399-1485
4. Tudor-1485-1603
5. Stuart-1603-1714
6. Hanoverian-1717-1901
7. Saxe-Coburg: The reign of Edward VII-1901-1910
8. Windsor-1910-the present.
This book was originally published for the general audience in England. An American, however, with a scant knowledge of British history could follow the fascinating story with ease. Fraser's style is elegantly easy to comprehend even when explaining complex economic, relgious and political controversies.
I assert that this fine book would be a good textbook for an introductory course on British history or it could serve as a valuable resource in a course on Enlish Literature.
Fraser's book focuses on politics,& royalty and gives little space to the lives of everyday people. In that sense it is an old fashioned type histiography. The book is well illustrated with period etchings and photos. Her work on post-1900 was especially well done as she describes World War I and World War's II's devastation of the British Empire. Her words on Prime Minister Magaret Thatcher were also valuable.
The book has a handy bibliography of works which will lead the interested reader to exploring personalities, reigns and times which are covered in the Fraser text. Unlike many books in my library I know I will be referring to this one for years to come. Worth it's price!
  • Rgia
Well written, as in the author makes the reader want to read more. I like History, but this was a pleasant way to learn in the process. Using this as 1 of 6 books for a British History (high school class). Almost would be content using only this book. Awesome writing skills Rebecca Fraser!! Thank you.
  • Grinin
I concur with several other reviewers who have indicated that this book is provides an excellent means of "getting a grip" on British history without going into excruciatingly fine detail. The prose is quite readable without any sense of being "talked down to." Having the Kindle dictionary is convenient as occasional use is made of British terminology that is uncommon in the U.S. I find this a positive as the etymology can be enlightening. I considered giving this book five stars but decided against it only because that sort of rating should, in my opinion, be reserved for books that are life-changing!

I decided to read a book on British History because throughout my life I've encountered references to the topic that I've understood only vaguely through their context. Reading this has been time well spent - I should have done it years ago!