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Download Naked Heart: A Soldier's Journey to the Front eBook

by Harold Pagliaro

Download Naked Heart: A Soldier's Journey to the Front eBook
ISBN:
0943549418
Author:
Harold Pagliaro
Category:
Historical Study & Educational Resources
Language:
English
Publisher:
Truman State Univ Pr; UK ed. edition (September 1, 1996)
Pages:
238 pages
EPUB book:
1845 kb
FB2 book:
1413 kb
DJVU:
1455 kb
Other formats
lrf mbr azw docx
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
136


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English Literature Faculty Works. Naked Heart: A Soldier's Journey To The Front. This is a powerful statement about the dark and vainglorious side of combat as experienced in World War II by a young private, Harold Pagliaro. Harold E. Pagliaro, Swarthmore College Follow. Published In. Published By. Thomas Jefferson University Press.

a soldier's journey to the front. by Harold E. Pagliaro. Published 1996 by Thomas Jefferson University Press in Kirksville, Mo. Written in English. American Personal narratives, Biography, Personal narratives, American, Soldiers, United States, United States. Army, World War, 1939-1945.

NAKED HEART: A SOLDIER"S JOURNEY TO THE FRONT by Harold Pagliaro .

On November 1943, Harold Pagliaro, in his first year as an engineering student at Columbia, began his journey to the front lines in France.

Naked Heart : A Soldier's Journey to the Front. By (author) Harold Pagliaro.

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Hosts books, online databases, DVD, VCD, Music C. Naked heart : a soldier's journey to the front, ISBN: 0943549442. Pagliaro Harold E. Thomas Jefferson University Press

Hosts books, online databases, DVD, VCD, Music CD. Koha OSS YD. Thomas Jefferson University Press, 1996.

We Are Soldiers Still is the ideal follow-up to Moore and Galloway’s We Were Soldiers Onc. nd Young. Other author's books: We Are Soldiers Still: A Journey Back to the Battlefields of Vietnam

We Are Soldiers Still is the ideal follow-up to Moore and Galloway’s We Were Soldiers Onc. Other author's books: We Are Soldiers Still: A Journey Back to the Battlefields of Vietnam. We Are Soldiers Still: A Journey Back to the Battlefields of Vietnam.

Algernon, Charlie, and I: a writer's journey/Daniel Keyes. One crisp April morning in 1945, I climbed the steps to the elevated platform of the Sutter Avenue BMT station in Brownsville, Brooklyn. 1st Harvest ed. p. c. (A Harvest book). ISBN-13 978-0-15-602999-5. I'd have a ten- or fifteen-minute wait for the train that would take me to Manhattan, where I would change for the local to the Washington Square branch of New York University. I recall wondering where I would get the money for the fell semester.

This is a powerful statement about the dark and vainglorious side of combat as experienced in World War II by a young private, Harold Pagliaro. His true story is a gripping, authentic account of men's behaviour in the face of death on the battlefield.
  • Billy Granson
Pagliaro was another ASTP lad, whose war was with `A' troop, 121st Cav Rec Sqn of the 106th Cav Recon Group (comprised also of, confusingly, the 106th Cav Rec Sqn). Originally with the 87th Infantry Div, he is sent as a general replacement to Europe and it is this situation that is the core of Pagliaro's story. A bright and sensitive young man, he felt terribly misused by the army. As he writes "the Army drew the line abruptly. Once you turned nineteen, they could send you out by your-self, as a solo replacement, to a unit at the front, where you'd fight among strangers who didn't know you and didn't want to know you - they had other things on their mind. In following this policy, the army sent up men many thought too young for battle. It also placed them where they could not share in the outfit's esprit de corps, the sense of belonging that alone makes the repeated exposure to death bearable."

Many men had the terrible experience of being separated from the friends they'd made in training and being sent, as a stranger, to a line outfit which had little option but to throw replacements straight into action - but it's hard to imagine the awfulness of it all has been exposed as powerfully as Pagliaro manages here. He is a very fluent writer and the dislocation he experienced is revealed with considerable detail. He hardly ever goes on patrol with the same men, almost all of whom are totally uninterested in making friends with him. He manages, through little fault of his own, to get offside with his commanding officer and on another occasion he bravely defies a ridiculous order from a senior NCO. With his leaders viewing him as an expendable troublemaker he finds himself sent on some almost suicidal missions.

As for combat, Pagliaro arrives in October 44 and serves in the Vosges, mainly on patrols, in vehicles and on foot. He is shelled but he doesn't have much opportunity to shoot back. His final action is quite astonishing though. His unit is ordered to assault through a forest and it is just a debacle. Again what he reveals here contrasts with what is usually written. Incompetence reigns and Pagliaro is wounded. His departure from the front is quite extraordinary and indicative of his disconnection with his unit and the army. As he writes, he entered the army a stranger and left as one too.

This is by no means one long whine by a reluctant soldier, indeed he was one of the 13% who earned the Expert Infantryman badge in training. His perspective is just quite different and he reveals aspects of service that others haven't covered. For instance, he is continually frustrated that things are never explained to him and he articulates well how this further contributed to his sense of disconnect and insecurity. He writes too of his envy of men from an armoured division, with their powerful equipment and camaraderie and contrasts it with the vulnerability of his situation.
There is something special about this book. It is the voice of a soldier that we rarely get to hear and Pagliaro is a very effective writer (post war he was an English lecturer). He writes with great clarity and he has a knack for drawing you in. His anger at the callous indifference of the army is very clear. He was placed in the most hellish of circumstances but denied the most basic support that should've been his foremost right for risking his life. What he has to reveal is extremely valuable, it contrasts starkly with the experiences of most others here, particularly the tight knit members of the airborne and is almost an antidote or a reality check to the war fanciers amongst us. Combat is incredibly cruel and vicious, being forced to endure it essentially alone, was scandalous. My rating - Recommended plus
  • Naa
While I served in the European Theater during World War II, Professor Pagliaro's experiences and mine were significantly different. He served as a replacement, while I joined my armored field artilelry battalion before the unit went overseas. Infantry and cavalry performed the most difficult and dangerous tasks in combat and replacements served even more difficult roles in these units.
I found this book to be an excellent description of Pagliaro's combat experiences and also an excellent espression of his feelings and reactions to some very difficult combat assignments as well as difficult miltiary leaders. Pagliaro suffered problems similar to many ASTP students, but many of these persons failed to survive their assignments in the infantry and cavalry and few have expressed their feelings so adequately.
I highly recommend this book not only for veterans of World War II, but for all who wish to learn more about the role fo the "little people" in that conflict.
  • Uleran
NAKED HEART: A SOLDIER"S JOURNEY TO THE FRONT by Harold Pagliaro--Reviewed >>>by Thomas H. Blackburn, Centennial Professor of English Literature, >>>Swarthmore College. >>> >>> On November 1943, Harold Pagliaro, in his first year as an engineering >>>student at Columbia, began his journey to the front lines in France. NAKED >>>HEART, his memoir of this formative experience, rich in remembered detail >>>and in emotion recalled with the clarity of mature hindsight, captures the >>>deep ambiguity of the thoughts and feelings of a sensitive and >>>introspective, yet tough and resourceful, youth. >>> The draft pulled Pagliaro from a close family, and from an especially >>>close relationship with his slightly younger brother, Robert. Many of his >>>anxieties about Army service are heightened by his concern that Robert may >>>be soon be subjected to the same risks. Missing his family and Robert as >>>confidant becomes a major part of the radical aloneness Pagliaro >>>experiences in a training system and then in a battlefield posting that >>>never made it possible for him to form a new intimacy with either young >>>draftees in basic or more veteran comrades overseas. Pagliaro's strongest >>>negative reactions recall the destruction of the individual privacy of an >>>enlisted man, and the sense of absolute subjection to an often irrational >>>and callous authority that could send a man into mortal danger without >>>doubt or explanation. >>> Balancing this critique of military reality is Pagliaro's pride in >>>meeting the physical demands of basic training and in mastering the >>>military skills needed to earn the Expert Infantryman's Badge. Genuine >>>delight in the lively power of a fit body, in appetite satisfied by good >>>food, and in endurance in the face of nearly impossible tasks are as much a >>>part of Pagliaro's Army life as his uneasy relation to authority. >>> In the autumn of 1944, Pagliaro found himself on the MAURETANIA, bound >>>for England and then for France as solo replacement for a cavalry division >>>decimated by the post D-Day battles across France. His narrative of the >>>weeks he spent on the lines before a serious leg wound, received in a >>>futile attack on an inconsequential Vosges town, Erckartswiller, sent him >>>on his journey back home, claims no overt heroics. It is a straightforward >>>account of his deep terror of artillery fire and of senseless slaughter and >>>frantic movement,--all conveyed with the concrete immediacy of the sounds, >>>the shapes, and even the taste of battle places and battle fears. A deep >>>sense for survival, impelled by a love of life as essential religion, vies >>>with the momentum of battle and the inevitable authority of command. As >>>Pagliaro runs forward through impeding woods on the third unsuccessful >>>attack against Erckartswiller, shell fragments tear his right calf almost >>>in two and send him from the front the hard way. He was alive, but his >>>relief would not be complete until he realized he would not heal soon >>>enough to be returned to the front. >>> His brother Robert had meanwhile escaped the Army, as Pagliaro had >>>hoped, studying to be an engineer at Virginia Military Institute and >>>serving in the Merchant Marine through 1945. With a brutal irony subtly >>>connected to artilery barrages Pagliaro so feared in France, Robert is >>>killed in November, 1946, at VMI, when a prank goes wrong and a vintage >>>cannon explodes during a peaceful pep rally. That blow,in which Pagliaro >>>says he felt "the awful fulfillment" of his terror at the front, finally >>>leads to renewed cherishing and understanding of life. And that in some >>>larger sense is finally what this book is all about.