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Download Bodies of War: World War I and the Politics of Commemoration in America, 1919-1933 eBook

by Lisa M. Budreau

Download Bodies of War: World War I and the Politics of Commemoration in America, 1919-1933 eBook
ISBN:
0814799906
Author:
Lisa M. Budreau
Category:
Military
Language:
English
Publisher:
NYU Press; First Edition edition (November 1, 2009)
Pages:
335 pages
EPUB book:
1309 kb
FB2 book:
1291 kb
DJVU:
1643 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
770


Budreau writes history for the layperson and the topic is so relevant to us today as we engage in multiple fronts

Budreau writes history for the layperson and the topic is so relevant to us today as we engage in multiple fronts. Aug 21, 2012 Darleen rated it really liked it. Shelves: history-academic, hospice-death-dying, spirituality.

Published by: NYU Press. World War I marked the first war in which the United States government and military took full responsibility for the identification, burial, and memorialization of those killed in battle, and as a result, the process of burying and remembering the dead became intensely political. The government and military attempted to create a patriotic consensus on the historical memory of World War I in which war dead were not only honored but used as a symbol to legitimize America's participation in a war not fully supported by all citizens. The saga of American soldiers killed in World War I and the.

Bodies of War : World War I and the Politics of Commemoration in America, 1919-1933. The United States lost thousands of troops during World War I, and the government gave next-of-kin a choice about what to do with their fallen loved ones: ship them home for burial or leave them permanently in Europe, in makeshift graves that would be eventually transformed into cemeteries in France, Belgium, and England.

Bodies of War: World War I and the Politics of Commemoration in America, 1919-1933 by Lisa M. Budreau . A superb book that should be on the bookshelf of anyone seeking to understand the complex political, military, and cultural legacy of World War I on American society.

A superb book that should be on the bookshelf of anyone seeking to understand the complex political, military, and cultural legacy of World War I on American society. Trout’s work ably demonstrates the malleability of memory even when cast in stone or set in print. On the Battlefield of Memory is especially attentive to understanding the mix of nostalgia, comradeship and political activism that marked the American Legion during the interwar years.

Published by: NYU Press.

Lisa Budreau, author of Bodies of War: World War I and the politics of commemoration in America 1919-1933, visited the MacArthur Memorial in October 2012 and lectured on the topic of repatriation, memorialization, and the creation of American cemeteries overseas to commemorate the fallen. World War I marked the first war in which the United States government and military took full responsibility for the identification, burial, and memorialization of those killed in battle

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Lisa Budreau's book Bodies of War is the story of America's painful journey in learning what to do with the mortal remains of the young men who lost their lives, how to honor them, and the role their families and their government would have in the commemoration of their ultimate sacrifice. 1919 Photo of the . Meuse-Argonne Cemetery Under Construction

World War I memorials commemorate the events and the casualties of World War I. These war memorials include civic memorials, larger national monuments, war cemeteries.

World War I memorials commemorate the events and the casualties of World War I. These war memorials include civic memorials, larger national monuments, war cemeteries, private memorials and a range of utilitarian designs such as halls and parks, dedicated to remembering those involved in the conflict. Huge numbers of memorials were built in the 1920s and 1930s, with around 176,000 erected in France alone.

The United States lost thousands of troops during World War I, and the government gave next-of-kin a choice about what to do with their fallen loved ones: ship them home for burial or leave them permanently in Europe, in makeshift graves that would be eventually transformed into cemeteries in France, Belgium, and England. World War I marked the first war in which the United States government and military took full responsibility for the identification, burial, and memorialization of those killed in battle, and as a result, the process of burying and remembering the dead became intensely political. The government and military attempted to create a patriotic consensus on the historical memory of World War I in which war dead were not only honored but used as a symbol to legitimize America’s participation in a war not fully supported by all citizens.

The saga of American soldiers killed in World War I and the efforts of the living to honor them is a neglected component of United States military history, and in this fascinating yet often macabre account, Lisa M. Budreau unpacks the politics and processes of the competing interest groups involved in the three core components of commemoration: repatriation, remembrance, and return. She also describes how relatives of the fallen made pilgrimages to French battlefields, attended largely by American Legionnaires and the Gold Star Mothers, a group formed by mothers of sons killed in World War I, which exists to this day. Throughout, and with sensitivity to issues of race and gender, Bodies of War emphasizes the inherent tensions in the politics of memorialization and explores how those interests often conflicted with the needs of veterans and relatives.

  • Amarin
This is an outstanding contribution to the bibliography of the United States involvement in the First World War. The politics behind remembrance and commemoration in the immediate aftermath of conflict are often clouded by - variously - jingoistic reporting, partisan commentary and cynicism. There is sufficient distance to the subject of this book to allow the author to cut through that and provide a superbly researched, detailed commentary on the complexities of battlefield burial, repatriation and commemoration in the segregated United States. This is a fabulous piece of work and highly recommended. Worth reading alongside David Crane's 'Empires of the Dead'.
  • Gandree
This was a very informative text and adds to a growing body of scholarship on the practice and politics of honoring those who fell during the Great War. What shines through the text is the humanity on a local and national scale while simultaneously informing the reader of how the fallen were exploited by commercial interests. Recommend this book for anyone needing a primer on the origins of post-war commemoration and what would become the American Battle Monuments Commission.
  • Eta
Le livre est arrivé dans les délais et bien emballé. Je n'ai malheureusement pas trouvé les informations que je cherchais dans ce livre mais il est sérieux et bien documenté. A recommander pour ceux qui s'intéresse au rapatriement des boys vers les USA.
  • Mr_Mix
I have finished reading this book and am really impressed with the research Dr. Budreau had to do in order to cover this subject so completely. I had no idea that this story she writes about had so much politics involved and would be so complicated. This had to be a most difficult task putting these facts together in readable form. Last but not least I really appreciate her adding the information about the Harris family
from my hometown of Cedartown, Georgia.

Millard Greer
Cedartown, Georgia
  • Mr.mclav
Excellent book! Horrifying and tragic, but well written and contained a lot of good historical information on a topic most do not care to think about.
  • Xellerlu
BODIES OF WAR: WORLD WAR I AND THE POLITICS OF COMMEMORATION IN AMERICA, 1919-1933
LISA M. BUDREAU
NEW YORK UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2011
QUALITY SOFTCOVER, $28.00, 318 PAGES, ABBREVIATIONS, MAPS, NOTES, BIBLIOGRAPHY, INDEX

Author Lisa M. Budreau begins by explaining how our war dead were treated prior to the creation of the American Battlefields Monuments Commission (ABMC) in 1923. It was in the aftermath of the Spanish-American War, that the then Superintendent of the U.S. Burial and Disinterment Corps, David H. Rhodes, was faced with the dauntless task of caring for those American soldiers and sailors that had been killed-in-action. He and his staff of hospital corpsmen had to face an apathetic U.S. diplomatic service as well as an uncaring military bureaucracy. By the time World War I had ended in November, 1918, the burial, exhumation, reburial, and eventual shipment of U.S. war dead home became a ghastly, chaotic, and haphazard affair. This can be traced to the fact that the U.S. had no strict protocol prior to its entry into the war in April, 1917.

Once plans were arranged for the bodies to be returned, transportation across France became a logistical nightmare requiring large numbers of trucks, barges, railway cars, labor, and coffins. Numerous cases of mistaken identity were reported by families who claimed to have received the wrong body (while others were promised remains that never arrived). In an attempt to get bodies back more expeditiously from overseas, some families with the means to do so, were willing to pay as much as $2,500.00 for their loved ones, to unscrupulous officials. By the close of 1921, the gruesome burial work was nearly complete after the American military had shipped close to 46,000 dead to the United States and 764 to European places of birth.

The author has written a long overdue and timely book on how such a simple but noble mission to properly intern and honor America's war dead from World War I became entangled in politics, racism, symbolism, and competing interest groups. As in any book of this type, there will be some mistakes by the author and they are listed below:

*Preface-The Ku Klux Klan was founded in Pulaski, Tennessee in 1865 not 1915. The author is writing about the second Klan that came to prominence after World War I. The word marines should be written as Marines. The American Legion was founded in February, 1915 not 1919 while the VFW was founded on 23 November 1899.

*Page 154-The author makes mention of a Pennsylvania division. It was the 79th Infantry Division (313th, 314th, 315th, and 316th Infantry Regiments) was established on 5 August 1917 at Camp Meade, Maryland. It was composed of draftees from Eastern Maryland, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia. Later draftees came from New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, and West Virginia. It is called the Cross of Lorraine Division. The 37th Infantry Division was formed on 18 July 1917 from the former 16th National Guard division. Concentrating the division began at Camp Sheridan, Alabama on 3 August 1917. It was composed of men from Ohio and West Virginia and was known as the Buckeye Division. The 92nd Infantry Division wasn't permanently attached to the French 87th Infantry Division.

*Page 155-No mention made of the Americans who served in the British Expeditionary Force or other Allied armies. There were four not two U.S. divisions that served with the British in Flanders-the 27th, 30th, 37th, and 91st Infantry Divisions. The two U.S. divisions that served on the Hindenburg Line with the Australian Corps-the 27th and 30th Infantry Divisions.

*Page 244-Barack Obama's election in 2008 was viewed more as him being the first black U.S. president than U.S. senator from Illinois. U.S. Senator John McCain's status as a Vietnam Veteran POW means that being a veteran is still an important asset if you're running for public office.

*Page 246-The Iwo Jima Memorial was to represent all U.S. Marines who fought in America's wars and thus there are no names on the memorial. It was to be anonymous.

*Page 249-presidential unit citation should be written as Presidential Unit Citation.

*Page 270-The two most well known novels of the Vietnam War are James Webb's Fields Of Fire and John Del Vecchio's 13th Valley.

*Page 271-In the movie Blackhawk Down, the following units were involved: U.S. Navy SEALs; B Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment; 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment or DELTA Force; and the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) "Night Stalkers."

*Page 276-MacArthur wasn't sent to the Philippines for his firing on the Bonus Marchers. MacArthur's father was a recipient of the Medal of Honor as was Douglas MacArthur. Eisenhower was his secretary/aide while in Washington, D.C. and MacArthur supported a strong military and publicly criticized pacifism and isolationism. He retired in December, 1937 and reverted to his permanent grade of major general. He accepted $1 million from President Quezon of the Philippines upon his retirement in 1937 to head the Philippine Army. MacArthur's staff members received compensation but Eisenhower declined. MacArthur is still listed as the senior officer on the rolls of the Philippine Army today.

*Page 282-WASPs were Federal employees and why no mention of the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) and their role in World War II. Then why were the WASPs given veteran status and not the members of the Civil Air Patrol.

*Page 309-The last surviving War Between The States veteran was Albert Woolson and his date of death was 2 August 1956 not 2 August 1856.

*Page 326-Retired U.S. Senator Robert Dole is from Kansas not Nebraska.

*Page 375-Oliver Stone's script for Pinkville is on hold right now.

*Page 394-Max Cleland is a triple amputee Vietnam Veteran-two legs above the knees and his right forearm.

*NOTE-Members of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team are credited with the following: 21 Medals of Honor, 7 Distinguished (later Presidential) Unit Citations, 52 Distinguished Service Crosses, 1 Distinguished Service Medal, 560 Silver Stars with 28 Oak Leaf Clusters, 22 Legions Of Merit, 15 Soldier's Medals, 4,000 Bronze Stars with 1,200 Oak Leaf Clusters, and 9,486 Purple Hearts.

Lt. Colonel Robert A. Lynn, Florida Guard
Orlando, Florida
  • Malahelm
Bodies of War gave me a better appreciation of the pain families experienced when the body of their loved one is not returned to them -- although it was part of my family history. I never thought about the complexity of returning bodies of war dead.

Bodies of War is a very easy read. Dr Budreau's research and her scholarly work is evident but the book is never boring or tedious. Dr Budreau kept me interested in the subject matter.

Any one interested in world conflicts and WWI in particular should read Lisa Budreau's Bodies of War.
At last, a book that takes you behind the scenes on the homefront in WWI. I had an aunt who died overseas in 1918, and I know from her letters and my research that this book is accurate, informative, terribly interesting and sad.
The research represented here is astounding. No one, I repeat, no one has written a book like this before. It is an eye-opener. I am surprised somebody hasn't tried to censor it.
Nelle Fairchild Rote, Pa.