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Download Titan II: A History of a Cold War Missile Program eBook

by David Stumpf

Download Titan II: A History of a Cold War Missile Program eBook
ISBN:
1557286019
Author:
David Stumpf
Category:
Military
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Arkansas Press (July 1, 2002)
Pages:
320 pages
EPUB book:
1717 kb
FB2 book:
1617 kb
DJVU:
1182 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
582


The Titan II ICBM (intercontinental ballistic missile) program was developed by the United States military to. .David Stumpf previously wrote a book on the Navy's Regulus cruise missile that is a pretty comprehensive history.

Each missile carried a single warheadthe largest in . inventoryused liquid fuel propellants, and was stored and launched from hardened underground silos. He did a good job with that one. Now he has turned his attention to the Titan II and done another great job.

David K. Stumpf uses a wide range of sources, drawing upon interviews with and memoirs by engineers and airmen as well as recently declassified government documents and other public materials. Over 170 drawings and photographs, most of which have never been published, enhance the narrative. The three major accidents of the program are described in detail for the first time using authoritative sources.

David Stumpf previously wrote a book on the Navy's Regulus cruise missile that is a pretty comprehensive history

David Stumpf previously wrote a book on the Navy's Regulus cruise missile that is a pretty comprehensive history.

With a Foreword by Jay W. Kelley. Published by: University of Arkansas Press.

Stumpf, David (2000). Titan II: A History of a Cold War Missile Program (1st e. University of Arkansas Press. p. 249. ISBN 1-55728-601-9.

The Titan II ICBM (intercontinental ballistic missile) program was developed by the United States military to bolster .

Each missile carried a single warhead-the largest in . inventory-used liquid fuel propellants, and was stored and launched from hardened underground silos. David K.

Stumpf, David . 1953-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Titan II : a history of a Cold War missile program, David K. Stumpf ; with a foreword by Jay W.

Titan II: A History of a Cold War Missile Program, by David K. Stumpf. Origin Story: A Big History of Everything, by David Christian. Limits to Growth: The 30-Year Update, by Donella Meadows, Jorgen Randers, and Dennis Meadows. Big technology and invention

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Titan II: A History of a Cold War Missile Program. Stumpf uses a wide range of sources, drawing upon interviews with and memoirs by engineers and airmen as well as recently declassified government documents and other public materials

Titan II: A History of a Cold War Missile Program.

Penson’s book - The Titan II Handbook: A Civilian’s Guide to the Most Powerful ICBM America Ever Built .

Penson’s book - The Titan II Handbook: A Civilian’s Guide to the Most Powerful ICBM America Ever Built (Tucson: Chuck Penson, 2008) - provides an excellent, well-illustrated overview of the weapon system. A book by David K. Stumpf looks at the subject in greater detail: Titan II: A History of a Cold War Missile Program (Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press, 2000)

The Titan II ICBM (intercontinental ballistic missile) program was developed by the United States military to bolster the size, strength, and speed of the nation's strategic weapons arsenal in the 1950s and 1960s. Each missile carried a single warhead―the largest in U.S. inventory―used liquid fuel propellants, and was stored and launched from hardened underground silos. The missiles were deployed at basing facilities in Arkansas, Arizona, and Kansas and remained in active service for over twenty years. Since military deactivation in the early 1980s, the Titan II has served as a reliable satellite launch vehicle. This is the richly detailed story of the Titan II missile and the men and women who developed and operated the system. David K. Stumpf uses a wide range of sources, drawing upon interviews with and memoirs by engineers and airmen as well as recently declassified government documents and other public materials. Over 170 drawings and photographs, most of which have never been published, enhance the narrative. The three major accidents of the program are described in detail for the first time using authoritative sources. Titan II will be welcomed by librarians for its prodigious reference detail, by technology history professionals and laymen, and by the many civilian and Air Force personnel who were involved in the program―a deterrent weapons system that proved to be successful in defending America from nuclear attack.
  • Snowseeker
After a visit to the Titian II Missile Museum I was intrigued with the US missile projects and achievements even more. The first book read was "The Titian 2 Handbook" by Chuck Penson. In the back of the book is a list of recommended or must read books; this book was on the list and had high marks.
This book contains facts, figures and an in depth look at the missile program from Atlas to Titian 2. Not a hard read or too technical. I found "The Titian 2 Handbook" an excellent companion on the subject. After reading both books make a visit to the Museum and it will all come together.
  • Cointrius
I enjoyed TITAN II and only wish someone would chronicle the Minuteman ICBM weapon system as well as David Stumpf has. He provides an excellent historical background and technical details to set the stage for the Titan II story. I got a little bogged down on the extensive coverage of engineering, testing and deployment construction as well as details on nearly every test launch. My favorite parts of the book had to do with the missile crew members that manned this most imposing nuclear weapon along with the tragic accidents that Titan II is remembered for. This book provides an enjoyable and important story that accurately documents a vital part of our nation's cold war. From 1968 to 1979 I was assigned to the Strategic Air Command, as a Minuteman Launch Officer and then trainer, so the Titan II story this book tells has special meaning for me. Titan II made a significant scientific and defense contribution to America and this book does a grand job of telling this story.
  • sunrise bird
There are a number of good books on the history of ballistic missiles. Edmund Beard, Richard Armacost and Harold Sapolski have all written classic books on the management of early ballistic missile programs. There are some more recent books that either re-cover this earlier ground or add to it. However, there are no real technical histories devoted to the development of any of the ballistic missiles the United States has built over the years. This book begins to fill that void.
David Stumpf previously wrote a book on the Navy's Regulus cruise missile that is a pretty comprehensive history. He did a good job with that one. Now he has turned his attention to the Titan II and done another great job.
Titan II is a detailed history of the development of the United States' second ICBM (technically, it could be considered the third, since it bears only limited resemblance to the Titan I that preceded it). This is a book focused on the technical development of the missile, the development and construction of its launch silos, its launch tests, its operational history, and its retirement from service in the 1980s. It is filled with illustrations, most of which have never been published before. And it is clear from his sources that he did not simply review previously published articles on the Titan II, but interviewed the people who worked on it and gathered information from private archives and previously classified materials.
The book does not go into the development of the space launch version of the Titan. The history of the development of the Titan III and the Titan IV rockets still awaits writing. He does, however, include a chapter on the refurbishment of old Titan II ICBMs into launch vehicles during the 1980s.
Stumpf includes an interesting discussion of the development of missile reentry vehicles. This is a subject that I personally believe could use a book in itself. I think it would be fascinating to trace the development of this technology.
Stumpf also includes an extensive discussion of several accidents involving the Titan II. And he discusses how and why the missiles were ultimately removed from service.
There are also useful appendices at the end of the book, listing the various flight tests (and their accuracy), the missiles produced, and other details.
We can only hope that he turns his attention to other early Cold War missile programs. This is an impressive piece of work.
  • Auridora
As an MCCC at McConnell the book brought back several memories of hundreds or so crew alerts I pulled. The book explains many of the hazards the crews had to daily work with and the changes made to improve our safety. Also covered are the major site accidents with detail. The Titan II served our country for 25 years and in the end was replaced by advance missile systems. Fitting the first page of the book lists in memorial the names of the 58 individuals who lost their lives at Titan II missile launch complexes. Book is loaded with many pictures, and tables (includes crews who launched at Vandenberg AFB). This book is a read and must have for Air Force personal who spent service time on a Titan II site(s).
  • Olelifan
As a former Titan II crew member, this book is now a keepsake in my library. It brought back memories and I learned so much more then I knew at the time. I highly recommend this for any of the brave warriours who stood watch over this system for the 20+ years it was in commission. Thank you Mr Stumpf for capturing such a vital part of Air Force and this Nation's history!
  • Jark
Having worked in the Titian II silos this book is very detailed and informative. It was interesting to see how and why these were built back in the late 60's. Brings back a lot of memories. Highly recommend.
  • Yannara
Well-written, exhaustively researched and painstakingly precise. I served as a MCCC at the 390th SMW and this book brought to light many aspects of the Titan II of which I was not previously aware. May not be of great interest to the casual reader, but for those of us were part of the Titan II "family," it is terrific!
When I was 18 years old, in 1967, I enlisted in the USAF. I was sent to technical school to learn how to refuel and maintain the refueling equipment for the Titan II ICBM. My first assignment was to the 308 Missile Inspection and Maintenance Squadron, 308 Strategic Missile Wing, Little Rock AFB, AR. This book is a walk down memory lane for me.