almediah.fr
» » Battle Tactics of the Western Front: The British Army`s Art of Attack, 1916-18

Download Battle Tactics of the Western Front: The British Army`s Art of Attack, 1916-18 eBook

by Mr. Paddy Griffith

Download Battle Tactics of the Western Front: The British Army`s Art of Attack, 1916-18 eBook
ISBN:
0300059108
Author:
Mr. Paddy Griffith
Category:
Military
Language:
English
Publisher:
Yale University Press; 1st edition (May 25, 1994)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1248 kb
FB2 book:
1509 kb
DJVU:
1996 kb
Other formats
docx doc azw mobi
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
329


In 1916 the British Army launched a huge attack which was latter to be called the battle of the Somme. After a three day artillery barrage over 50,000 soldiers emerged from their trenches and in parade ground formation walked slowly towards the German lines.

In 1916 the British Army launched a huge attack which was latter to be called the battle of the Somme. Unfortunately the artillery barrage had used low calibre shells and as a result the German defenders were unharmed.

According to Griffith, the British were already masters of "storm troop tactics" by the end of 1916, and in several .

According to Griffith, the British were already masters of "storm troop tactics" by the end of 1916, and in several important respects were further ahead than the Germans would be even in 1918. In fields such as the timing and orchestration of all-arms assaults, predicted artillery fire, "Commando-style" trench raiding, the use of light machine guns, or the barrage fire of heavy machine guns, the British led the world.

Start by marking Battle Tactics of the Western Front: The . Paddy Griffith was a senior lecturer in war studies at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst for 16 years.

Start by marking Battle Tactics of the Western Front: The British Army& Art of Attack, 1916-18 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Mr Griffith has again selected a period considered by many to be a sterile time when millions of young men went to their deaths as automatons, mindlessly walking into pre-sited machine guns, planned artillery concentrations and impassible barbed wire entanglements. All of which was sited in the man-made quagmire of No-Mans Land.

Phalanx vs Legion : Battle of Cynoscephalae - Продолжительность: 12:00 Syntagma Recommended for you.

How did the US Navy win the Battle of Midway? - Продолжительность: 23:48 Invicta Recommended for you. Новинка! 23:48. Battle Of The ISANDLWNA 》( 1879/01/22 ) - Продолжительность: 14:21 유진우 Recommended for you. 14:21. Phalanx vs Legion : Battle of Cynoscephalae - Продолжительность: 12:00 Syntagma Recommended for you. 12:00. Охотник на "Тигров" - Продолжительность: 25:11 Телеканал ОНТ Recommended for you. 25:11. Over The Top (1987) Фильмы.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780300066630.

Battle Tactics of the Western Front: The British Army& Art of Attack, 1916-18. Published by: Yale University Press. In this book a renowned military historian studies the evolution of British infantry tactics during the war and challenges this interpretation, showing that while the British army's plans and technologies failed persistently during the improvised first half of the war, the army gradually improved its technique, technology, and, eventually, its' self-assurance

Paddy Griffith is the author of numerous other books on military subjects, including Battle Tactics of the Civil War. Formerly a senior lecturer in war studies at the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst, England, he is now a freelance author and publisher. Country of Publication.

Paddy Griffith is the author of numerous other books on military subjects, including Battle Tactics of the Civil War. History & Military.

GRIFFITH, PADDY (Author) Yale University Press (Publisher). Western Front 1914-1918, Theatre of operations. New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America. whole: Dimensions: 24cm. Pagination: xvi, 286p. France and the Low Countries 1939-1940. forms of warfare related to branch of service western front first world war. infantry tactics. conduct of offensives. minor tactics by arm of service. technology and war. technological developments and war. Related objects.

Paddy Griffith (1994). Battle Tactics of the Western Front: The British Army's Art of Attack, 1916-18. This year has been the year of the great breakthrough on all fronts of the construction of socialism. Yale University Press. p. 32. ^ "breakthrough". Gellately, Robert (2012). 9: Stalin's new initiatives". Lenin, Stalin and Hitler: The Age of Social Catastrophe. 165. ISBN 9781448138784.

Paddy Griffith Battle Tactics of the Western Front: The British Army& Art of Attack, 1916-18. Historians have portrayed British participation in World War I as a series of tragic debacles, with lines of men mown down by machine guns, with untried new military technology, and incompetent generals who threw their troops into improvised and unsuccessful attacks. According to Griffith, the British were already masters of "storm troop tactics" by the end of 1916, and in several important respects were further ahead than the Germans would be even in 1918.

Historians have portrayed British participation in the Great War as a series of tragic debacles, with lines of men mown down by machine guns, untried new military technology and incompetent generals who threw their troops into improvised and unsuccessful attacks. In this book Paddy Griffith, a renowned military historian, examines the evolution of British infantry tactics during the war and challenges this interpretation, showing that while the British army's plans and technologies persistently failed during the improvised first half of the war, the army gradually improved its technique, technology and, eventually, its self-assurance. By the time of its successful sustained offensive in the autumn of 1918, he argues, the British army was demonstrating a battlefield skill and mobility that would rarely be surpassed even during the Second World War.Evaluating the great gap that exists between theory and practice, between textbook and bullet-swept mudfield, Griffith argues that many battles were carefully planned to exploit advanced tactics and to avoid casualties; but that the breakthrough was simply impossible under the conditions of the time. By the end of 1916 the British were already masters of 'storm-troop tactics' and, in several important respects, further ahead than the Germans would be even in 1918.In fields such as the timing and orchestration of all-arms assaults, predicted artillery fire, 'commando-style' trench raiding, the use of light machine guns or the barrage fire of heavy machine guns, the British led the world. Although British generals were not military geniuses, the book maintains they should at least be credited with having effectively invented much of the twentieth century's art of war.
  • Road.to sliver
An excellent account of how the British Army suffered grievous losses and then started the long, costly, road to fighting an unfightable war. Good specific details about the response of the Army, from the generals - or at least some of them - and more particularly, by the field and regimental officers, their NCOs, and the much abused private soldier to the horrors of trench warfare.

Like any decent book of the Great War, it is depressing reading as one scans the butcher's bill for most of the battles described. One can not but be enraged at the detached-from-reality stupidity of the senior officers who never SAW the front line and its hell-scape condition yet who blithely ordered their men to make utterly futile attacks. In particular, General Haig's pushing on with the battle of Passchendaele, to save his political ass, when rain made fighting all but impossible is a detestable case of literal murder.

Read and learn.
  • DrayLOVE
Good details in how WW1 tatics were developed in WW1 TRENCH WARFARE. Your go thru the development of tatics primary by British army of WW1
  • Goldendragon
It is an excellent source to track the devellopment of the British Army from a 19th Century colonial force to modern fighting machine.
  • Marinara
In 1916 the British Army launched a huge attack which was latter to be called the battle of the Somme. After a three day artillery barrage over 50,000 soldiers emerged from their trenches and in parade ground formation walked slowly towards the German lines. Unfortunately the artillery barrage had used low calibre shells and as a result the German defenders were unharmed. As the British approached the Germans leaped from their dugouts and started to fire using all the modern weapons of war they had available on the slowly advancing British. The slow movement and concentration meant that within a short time 50,000 men were either killed or wounded.
Since that battle most historians writing about the first world war have been little less than contemptuous of the British Military leadership in the first World War. Following the war, memoirs of individual soldiers have described accurately the horror of life in the trenches. Books such as In Flanders Fields and the Donkey's have ridiculed the military ability of Sir Douglas Haig the British Commander in Chief.
This book is an attempt to balance the impression which has been created of the British Officer Class as a number of ill informed Dodo's who had a callous disregard for the lives of their men. It examines in detail the battle tactics of the British at Squad and Battalion level. It shows that instead of the army developing a head in the sand attitude to the disasters which were befalling it that most officers were keen to innovate.
During the war a number of innovations were developed by the British prior to the use of the tank the innovation most people are familiar with. These included the Lewis Gun (a movable light machine gun) trench mortars and Mills bombs (hand grenades). One of the strengths of this book is that it shows that these developments were noted by British Officers and quickly used.
Mortars and Grenades became vital in attacks. The Lewis Gun became important not only in suppressing enemy fire but in holding newly won ground against counter attacks.
In fact if one looks at the first World War it is clear that both sides were innovating all the time. After the initial Somme Battles the Germans rejected the use of defensive trench systems in favour of machine gun posts and pill boxes. They then save there infantry for counter attacks. The British and French in turn had to alter there tactics to using artillery as a means of allowing there troops to approach enemy positions instead of expecting it destroy them. In addition the British succesfully used mines burried under the German positions to considerable effect.
All in all the book is interesting and adds to our understanding of the First World War a conflict which in the past has been over schematised.
  • Ynap
I would highly recommend this book for both students of military history and serving military officers. This book provides a good overview of the evolution of tactics, strategies and weapons to meet emerging challenges. It also provides a good account of how the British military evolves and changes to meet those challenges. Both will help military officers who are working with transformation and RMA issues.

Indeed, it is not an exaggeration to say that the British military has achieved one of the most impressive transformation, evolving from a small professional army to a large army consisting mostly of 'hostilities only' volunteers and conscripts. It is also not an exaggeration to say that the British military achieved a Revolution in Military Affairs within a few short years, not only in the use of new weapons such as the tank and aircraft, but also new tactics and strategies.

It is even more impressive that these transformations were accomplished while the British military was actively engaged in an on-going war with a powerful and capable enemy - the German military. Few military officers nowadays would have to meet such a daunting challenge. Those critical of this book, perhaps being civilians, might not have a good grasp of just how impressive this achievement was.

This knowlegeable account has helped overturn some of the enduring - and now we know - inaccurate myths of the British military in the First World War. It is neither polemical nor a strawman hypothesis, unless one is wedded to certain mythical views of WW1. Indeed, if there is any fault - and this is why I gave it 4 instead of 5 stars - it is presented in a rather dull and academic tone which might put off some casual readers.

But it remains highly recommended for professional readers.