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by John Keegan,Richard Matthews

Download Intelligence in War eBook
ISBN:
0736694374
Author:
John Keegan,Richard Matthews
Category:
Military
Language:
English
Publisher:
Books on Tape (2003)
EPUB book:
1856 kb
FB2 book:
1854 kb
DJVU:
1870 kb
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
934


Sir John Desmond Patrick Keegan OBE FRSL (15 May 1934 . With Richard Holmes he wrote the BBC documentary Soldiers: A History of Men in Battle. Intelligence in War: Knowledge of the Enemy from Napoleon to Al-Qaeda (2003).

Sir John Desmond Patrick Keegan OBE FRSL (15 May 1934 – 2 August 2012) was an English military historian, lecturer, writer and journalist. He wrote many published works on the nature of combat between prehistory and the 21st century, covering land, air, maritime, intelligence warfare and the psychology of battle. ISBN 0-375-40053-2 (also published with alternative subtitle as Intelligence in War: The value - and limitations - of what the military can learn about the enemy.

In this breakthrough study, the preeminent war historian John Keegan goes to the heart of a series of important conflicts to develop a powerful argument about military intelligence

In this breakthrough study, the preeminent war historian John Keegan goes to the heart of a series of important conflicts to develop a powerful argument about military intelligence. In his characteristically wry and perceptive prose, Keegan offers us nothing short of a new history of war through the prism of intelligence. He brings to life the split-second decisions that went into waging war before the benefit of aerial surveillance and electronic communications

ALSO BY JOHN KEEGAN The Iraq War Intelligence in War The First World War The Face of Battle The Nature of War (with Joseph Darracott) World Armies . Soldiers (with Richard Holmes). The Price of Admiralty

ALSO BY JOHN KEEGAN The Iraq War Intelligence in War The First World War The Face of Battle The Nature of War (with Joseph Darracott) World Armies Who’s Who in Military. The Price of Admiralty. The Second World War. A History of Warfare.

Keegan’s book deals with military intelligence, as distinguished from espionage: little glamour is involved, as these stories are wartime experiences. John Keegan was a military historian. His eight chapters, mostly war stories, provide meaningful lessons about types of military intelligence, where it can be successfully applied, and how it is limited. The background is itself, a short history lesson. Keegan then describes the type of intelligence featured and how it was applied. At the episode’s conclusion, Keegan analyzes the value of the intelligence in that particular situation.

Also by John Keegan Intelligence in War The First World War The Face of Battle . Finally, my love and thanks to my children, Lucy, Tom, Rose and Matthew, and to my darling wife, Susanne.

Also by John Keegan Intelligence in War The First World War The Face of Battle The Nature of War (with Joseph Darracott) World Armies Who’s Who in Military History. Published in the United States by Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House, In. New York. Kilmington Manor, Wiltshire

Written by John Keegan, Audiobook narrated by Richard Matthews. Intelligence in War. Knowledge of the Enemy from Napoleon to Al-Qaeda.

Written by John Keegan, Audiobook narrated by Richard Matthews. Narrated by: Richard Matthews. Length: 15 hrs and 4 mins. Categories: History, Military.

Intelligence in War. Author: John Keegan Narrator: Richard Matthews Release Date: July 07, 2003

Intelligence in War. Author: John Keegan Narrator: Richard Matthews Release Date: July 07, 2003 About this audiobook.

Intelligence In War book. Keegan's narrative sweep is enthralling, whether portraying the dilemmas of Nelson seeking Napoleon's fleet, Stonewall Jackson in the American Civil War, Bletchley as it seeks to crack Ultra during the Battle of the Atlantic, the realities of the secret war in the Falklands or the numerous intelligence issues in the contemporary fight against terrorism.

John Keegan, whose many books, including classic histories of the two world wars, have confirmed him as the premier miltary . Intelligence in War : The Value-and Limitations-of What the Military Can Learn about the Enemy.

John Keegan, whose many books, including classic histories of the two world wars, have confirmed him as the premier miltary historian of our time, here presents . .

11 cassettes - 90 minutes each - unabridged edition
  • Hatе&love
Keegan’s book deals with military intelligence, as distinguished from espionage: little glamour is involved, as these stories are wartime experiences. John Keegan was a military historian. His eight chapters, mostly war stories, provide meaningful lessons about types of military intelligence, where it can be successfully applied, and how it is limited.

The book is well organized. Keegan prefaces each episode with rich background, so that the main activities are clearly understood in context. The background is itself, a short history lesson. Keegan then describes the type of intelligence featured and how it was applied. At the episode’s conclusion, Keegan analyzes the value of the intelligence in that particular situation.

Keegan’s episodes span across history from Napoleonic times through World War II, revealing the wide applicability of his lessons. Keegan then adds a chapter on intelligence since World War II. He concludes with an overall analysis on the value of military intelligence.

Surprisingly, Keegan concludes that in war, intelligence often fails its expectations. Information about the enemy, his location, and his plans is often either difficult to obtain, misleading or misinterpreted, or less important than the forces being employed. Even in the Battle of Midway, a near-perfect case where broken codes revealed the Japanese fleet’s intentions, the ultimate victory owed much to chance.

Not everyone will be tolerant with Keegan’s thorough development of his episodes, but few will be disappointed with his attention to detail. His lessons are instructive and his revelations bring his scenes to life.
  • Melipra
As a history major who served for 30 years as a field artillery with 12 years overseas including a combat tour in Vietnam, I have read and enjoyed several of John Keegan's books. As a senior officer, I had tours of duty as defense attaché at our embassies in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and New Delhi, India. I thus have some idea as to how information is acquired and processed into actionable intelligence. Following my Army career, I taught high history for 13 years including a course on Military History.
The first eight chapters, including Napoleon, Stonewall Jackson, wireless in World War I, and four examples from World War II, were insightful concerning how intelligence has been collected, used, and misused. As an American, I particularly enjoyed the chapters on Jackson and Midway.
The Epilogue, "Military Intelligence Since 1945," seemed rushed, as though the author was under pressure to quickly complete the book and turn it over to the publisher. The coverage of the Falkland War deserved its own chapter. Since Al-Qaeda was included in the title of this book, I was disappointed that it only received two pages in the Epilogue. Perhaps, the author was trying to make the book more relevant to today's reader with the title.
The Conclusion, "The Value of Military Intelligence," was too long and seemed a bit pedantic in comparison with the rest of the book.
"Intelligence in War" deserves a place in the library of serious students of military history.
  • Mushicage
This is a very diffuse book taking far too much verbiage to make the authors point. The admiral nelson Mediterranean debacle made a point but it should have been made in a few pages. Likewise Stonewall's valley adventures could have occupied <¼ the space to the advantage of the book. ( However, I must say that this is one of the best accounts of the campaign I have encountered.) The entire book would be much better if it was more to the point and less wordy. He left out Yardley's contribution and Hoover's reaction which had major consequences. He deals only consequently with the mideast post the Gulf War and he leaves out the impact of modern real time intelligence.

His point that intelligence is a tool and not a decisive victory is well made. As is his secondary point that covert action needs to be separated from intelligence gathering.
  • Spilberg
Sir John Keegan, the defense editor for "The Daily Telegraph" and one of the foremost military historians writing in English today, has turned his attention to an important but regularly overlooked topic--the role of military intelligence in combat operations. He argues that political intelligence is an ancient craft that goes back almost as far as recorded history, but military intelligence has until the last 200 hundred years or so had limited impact on the battlefield due to the technological challenges of getting information to a commander and then to units in the field. Intelligence was mainly the work of scouts.

In a series of case studies starting with the naval operations of Lord Nelson, Keegan argues: "Intelligence, however good, is not necessarily the means to victory; that ultimately, it is force, not fraud or forethought, that counts" (p. 334). Two of the most striking examples he uses are the battles of Crete in 1940 and Midway in 1942. At Crete, the British had accurate signals intelligence telling them what the Germans were going to do and they still lost. At Midway, the Americans had equally good information on what the Japanese intended, but random chance was the key to U.S. victory. The American planes that sank three of the four Japanese carriers were lost and found the enemy fleet by accident at a time when their defenses were ill prepared for another attack.

These arguments are important. We use this book at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College where I currently teach. Keegan's ideas are revisionist but also seem straight forward. The title is accurate. This book focuses only on military intelligence in war. The subtitle is a bit misleading. There is next to no mention of al-Qaeda in the book. Keegan is an exceptionally easy read, but he raises some significant questions which is always a good combination.