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Download Imperial Japanese Navy Aces 1937-45 (Osprey Aircraft of the Aces 22) eBook

by Tom Tullis,Henry Sakaida

Download Imperial Japanese Navy Aces 1937-45 (Osprey Aircraft of the Aces 22) eBook
ISBN:
1855327279
Author:
Tom Tullis,Henry Sakaida
Category:
Military
Language:
English
Publisher:
Osprey Publishing; First Edition edition (August 28, 1998)
Pages:
116 pages
EPUB book:
1339 kb
FB2 book:
1811 kb
DJVU:
1382 kb
Other formats
lit mobi txt rtf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
714


Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).

Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).

Aircraft of the Aces 22. Author: Henry Sakaida. Illustrator: Tom Tullis. The outcome of the Pacific War was heavily influenced by the results of naval battles between the Imperial Japanese fleet and the US Navy. Short code: ACE 22. Publication Date: 28 Aug 1998. One of the key elements was Japan's large fighter component, which had gained experience over Manchuria, China and Mongolia in the late 1930s. Flying A5Ms, at least 21 pilots achieved 'acedom' securing air superiority for the invaders.

Henry Sakaida, Tom Tullis. Series: Aircraft of the Aces 022. Manufacturer Mitsubishi derived much from these campaigns, producing one of the best fighters of the War, the A6M Zero-Sen. File: PDF, 2. 7 MB. Читать онлайн.

Series: Osprey Aircraft of the Aces No 1. Osprey aircraf t of the aces. . 13. Japanese Army Air Force Aces 1937– 45 Henry Sakaida. Please support our continuing book publishing programme by using this e-book responsibly

Series: Osprey Aircraft of the Aces No 13. File: PDF, 1. Related Titles - Aircraft of the Aces Series epub ISBN. Please support our continuing book publishing programme by using this e-book responsibly. Every effort has been made by the Publisher to secure permissions to use the images in this publication. If there has been any oversight we would be happy to rectify the situation and written submission should be made to Osprey Publishing. Распространяем знания с 2009.

Start by marking Imperial Japanese Navy Aces 1937-45 (Osprey Aircraft of the Aces) as Want to Read .

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The outcome of the Pacific War was heavily influenced by the results of naval battles between the Imperial Japanese fleet and the US Navy. Navy pilots proved to be highly skilled when engaged by the Allied forces, Pacific

Title: Imperial Japanese Navy Aces 1937-45.

Title: Imperial Japanese Navy Aces 1937-45. Series: Aircraft of the Aces . Volume: Nr. 22. ISBN-13: 9781855327276. We are aware of 10 similar reference publications related to "Reference books (Cross topic-aircraft)". Messerschmitt Me163 & Heinkel He162.

Book in the Osprey Aircraft of the Aces Series).

Imperial Japanese Navy Aces 1937–45 - Henry Sakaida. Kiyoto Koga became the first ace of the JNAF on 24 November 1937 when he shot down an 1-16 over Nanking. Osprey aircraft of the aces ®, 22. Imperial Japanese Navy Aces 1937–45. As a result of this achievement he received a rare personal citation from the CO of the China Area Fleet, Adm Kiyoshi Hasegawa. Seen as an excellent role model for young aviation trainees, Koga was sent home to work as an instructor in early 1938, but was subsequently killed in a flying accident in September of that same year (K Osuo).

He was the first artist to produce material for Osprey Aviation electronically. Tom’s most recent work can be found in Aces 26 and Combat Aircraft 16 and 20. Contents: The China War.

The outcome of the Pacific War was heavily influenced by the results of naval battles between the Imperial Japanese fleet and the US Navy. One of the key elements was Japan's large fighter component, which had gained experience over Manchuria, China and Mongolia in the late 1930s. Flying A5Ms, at least 21 pilots achieved 'acedom' securing air superiority for the invaders. Manufacturer Mitsubishi derived much from these campaigns, producing one of the best fighters of the War, the A6M Zero-Sen. Navy pilots proved to be highly skilled when engaged by the Allied forces, Pacific. Pilots like Nishizawa, Sagita and Sakai scoring more than 60 kills apiece.
  • Xor
I purchase this book used and I have recently finished reading it. It is an interesting book with very good graphics. Lots of pictures and accurate paintings. The organization of the book is a rough timeline of the different theaters in which the IJNAS fought China, Midway, Solomon Islands etc. Chapters begin with a brief summary of the conflict tin the theater and then individual biographies of the pilots. The information is summarized with some details of particular battles or dogfights. The information is presented in a somewhat disjointed form. Frequently the photographs on the page refer to pilots summarized on different pages. This disjointed approach is why I give the book four instead of five stars. The artwork in the book is beautiful and the guide in the back gives good detail of the craft presented. The book covers several types of planes which is nice. I just wish they would have arranged the book so if you were reading about a particular pilot they would have a photograph of him, his airplane, and a nice painting of his craft in the same section of the book. All in all I would say this book is a very valuable reference for anyone interested in the air war in the Pacific.
  • Shakanos
Ordinarily the Osprey series is readable and reliable However, this book is the exception. Imperial Aces shot down by Pigeon English! I don't know whether the author wrote in Japanese; if so, his idioms were not translated. Or perhaps the typesetter just omitted a word or two on each page.
One could wade through the gibberish to get to the meaning if only there were not factual errors as well. At one point the text tells us that both Musashi and Yamato were sunk at Leyte Gulf! I caught enough mistakes that I am forced to wonder whether there is more misinformation that I did not catch.
The book is strangely organized, with a short summation of each campaign. Then some campaigns have biographies attached, and some don't, without any clear reason for the attachment. Oddly enough, Saburo Sakai gets mentioned in most of the biographies. It seems unlikely that one enlisted pilot would be the pivotal mentor to so many aces. Either I have overlooked Sakai's importance to his own service, or the easy availability of Sakai's memoir has skewed the text so as to exaggerate his role.
The humanity of these pilots, and their pathetic fates, is moving despite all the literary problems. They deserved a better book.
  • Orll
These are very short career descriptions of the best fighter pilots Japan produced. Most of them end with "failed to return from a mission on [date]". The stories of the men are rather more involving than I expected from a page or less.

But the structure of the book leaves a lot to be desired. For one thing, each Japanese aircraft has a designation, like A5M4, a type, like Type 96, a Japanese name, like Gekko, and an Allied code name, like Claude. These four different names are used interchangeably through the text, but there is no reference where they are all put together. That is sorely needed. Also needed is a list of acronyms - for instance PO1 is used throughout the book, but never defined. According to Sakai Saburo in Samurai!, this means Naval Aviation Pilot First Class (Not Pilot Officer - the PO ranks were NCOs, neither Warrant Officers nor commissioned officers). I recommend that anyone interested in this book read that one first.

This book also suffers from poor editing. There are many places where some words are left out or the wrong word is used so that a passage just doesn't make sense. Still, you can usually figure out the meaning from the context, it's just puzzling at times.

Overall, the book does what it sets out to do, which is put a name and face on these men who lived and worked in hellish conditions, with little chance of survival. And a surprising number of them were enlisted men. The highest ranking officer in the list of aces is a Commander, with five Lt. Commanders.
  • Jeb
Challenging the Chinese Air Force in the mid to later 1930's, Many IJNAF pilots became aces flying the A5M 'Claude'. Then with the Pacific war, upgrading to the A6M Zero and N1K 'George'.

Ospreys biggest book I have read to date! 100, yes, 100 pages of information, pictures and color plates of both pilots and planes.
This book is a truly wounderful book. Yes, it could use some editing, but overall the book is good! Henry Sakaida does another good job of delivering a book about the IJN aces. The color plates of planes have a selection of Zeroes, 'Georges' and 'Nicks'. Even out-of-the-norm planes like the 'Claude', 'Jack', 'Rufe' and a 'Pete' floatplane.
A good book for anyone who wants to learn about the brave Japanese pilots who went up against the Hellcats, Corsairs, Lightnings, B-24s and B-29s.
Definitely a keeper in my library. 5 stars!
  • Preve
Good book - so little is written/recorded about the excellent and brave pilots of the IJN.

However, this book "reads" like a reference manual - lots of data, facts and chronology...but no "soul."

Oh well. The work is essential as it records the deeds of this little known group of warriors. It's factual, credible and good...just dry.

However, dry can be good - I've referred to my copy often.

wily
ww2fighters.blogspot.com
  • Wishamac
Sakaida fullfilled a historic gap with his book, but I don't like the "dictionary-like" style of the book. Anyway, it is the best I've ever read about Japanese fighter pilots, and the final appendixes are very instrutive.
  • Alianyau
1/2 book indes.
Very informative and plenty of facts, diagrams and photo's. Specific accounts of pilots records and accomplishments were excellent. Highly recommended.