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Download Lethal Frontiers: A Soviet View of Nuclear Strategy, Weapons, and Negotiations eBook

by Alexei G. Arbatov,Kent D. Lee

Download Lethal Frontiers: A Soviet View of Nuclear Strategy, Weapons, and Negotiations eBook
ISBN:
0275930173
Author:
Alexei G. Arbatov,Kent D. Lee
Category:
Military
Language:
English
Publisher:
Praeger (October 24, 1988)
Pages:
313 pages
EPUB book:
1833 kb
FB2 book:
1842 kb
DJVU:
1167 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
797


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Arbatov and Sherr change places: Arbatov, one of the brightest of the younger Soviet analysts, who runs a section of an institute parallel to the one directed by his father, Georgy, addresses the . MORE BY Gregory F. Treverton.

C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

ISBN: 1584875259 Publication & Distribution: Carlisle, PA. Strategic Studies Institute, . Army War College, (c)2012. C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site.

Lethal Frontiers: A Soviet View of Nuclear Strategy, Weapons, and Negotiations. January 1989 · Foreign affairs (Council on Foreign Relations). Gregory F.

A rising star in the Soviet foreign policy establishment, Arbatov offers a remarkable view of the evaluation of . nuclear policy and strategy. This scholarly book is free of the ideological constraints and negative effects of excessive Soviet secrecy so often characterizing Soviet works on this subject.

Arbatov A. Lethal Frontiers. A Soviet View of Nuclear Strategy, Weapons, and Negotiations. A. Arbatova, V. Dvorkina. Moscow: Carnegie Moscow Center. New York: Praeger 1988. 296 р. Arbatov А. Understanding the US–Russia Nuclear Schism. Dvorkin V. Space Weapons Programs. Outer Space: Weapons, Diplomacy, and Security. Ed. by A. Arbatov, V. Dvorkin. Washington: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Alexei G. Arbatov, Lethal Frontiers: A Soviet View of Nuclear Strategy/Weapons and . Arbatov, Lethal Frontiers: A Soviet View of Nuclear Strategy/Weapons and Negotiations, (New York: Praeger, 1988) p. 167Google Scholar. 12. ‘President’s Commission on Strategic Forces’ (Scowcroft Commission), Report (Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, April 1983), p. oogle Scholar. 30. Lauren H. Holland and Robert A. Hoover, The MX Decision: A New Direction in US Weapons Procurement Policy, (Boulder: Westview, 1985) p. 23.

For a sample of Soviet condemnations directed against Reagans aggressive foreign policy, see Alexei Arbatov, Lethal Frontiers: A Soviet View of Nuclear Strategy, Weapons, and Negotiations, trans

For a sample of Soviet condemnations directed against Reagans aggressive foreign policy, see Alexei Arbatov, Lethal Frontiers: A Soviet View of Nuclear Strategy, Weapons, and Negotiations, trans. Kent D. Lee (New York: Praeger, 1988), esp. pp. 115148; and G. M. Kornienko, Kholodnaya voina: Svidetelsvo uchastnika (Moscow: Mezhdunarodnye otnosheniya, 1995), pp. 210257. 26. Gates, From the Shadows, pp. 266270

Alexei Arbatov was an adviser to Mikhail Gorbachev He describes the difficulties in Soviet-US arms negotiations, specifically .

Alexei Arbatov was an adviser to Mikhail Gorbachev. In the interview he describes past, current, and future Soviet-U. He describes the evolution of President Reagan’s rhetoric on the Soviet Union, and American views on the Cold War. He describes the difficulties in Soviet-US arms negotiations, specifically negotiations between Reagan and Gorbachev at Geneva and Reykjavik, which he says left everyone disappointed. He calls for a plan that incrementally reduces both US and Soviet nuclear arms by half, and then half again, and so on.

The nuclear-weapons states have reneged on their obligation under the NPT’s Article VI to ‘undertake to pursue negotiations in good faith on effective measures relating to cessation of the nuclear arms race at an early date and to nuclear disarmament’.

In a September 1967 speech in San Francisco that attracted little notice at the time, Robert McNamara – then the US secretary of defense and one of the Cold War’s most formidable strategic thinkers – took note of the primacy of technological progress in determining the state’s policymaking: ‘There is a kind of mad momentum intrinsic to the development of all new nuclear. The nuclear-weapons states have reneged on their obligation under the NPT’s Article VI to ‘undertake to pursue negotiations in good faith on effective measures relating to cessation of the nuclear arms race at an early date and to nuclear disarmament’.

Lethal Frontiers is one of the first samples of Soviet scholarship on nuclear strategy readily available to Western readers. A rising star in the Soviet foreign policy establishment, Arbatov offers a remarkable view of the evaluation of U.S. nuclear policy and strategy. This scholarly book is free of the ideological constraints and negative effects of excessive Soviet secrecy so often characterizing Soviet works on this subject. The author begins by tracing the buildup of U.S. nuclear and conventional forces during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, and examines initial U.S. reactions to the achievement of strategic nuclear parity by the Soviet Union in the late 1960s and early 1970s. From notions of flexible response, to the Schlesinger doctrine, and ideas of fighting a limited nuclear war, Arbatov argues that the U.S. national security establishment has had enormous difficulty in reconciling itself with Soviet strategic parity. Consequently, U.S. strategy and arms programs have invariably collided with and contradicted the arms control process and efforts to decrease U.S.-Soviet tensions. In light of this, and of the new Soviet approach to security, Arbatov observes the challenges lying ahead in the new era of Soviet-American relations.