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by Agnes Newton Keith

Download Three Came Home eBook
ISBN:
0316486264
Author:
Agnes Newton Keith
Category:
Military
Language:
English
Publisher:
Atantic Monthly Press / Little Brown & Company (September 1947)
Pages:
316 pages
EPUB book:
1889 kb
FB2 book:
1662 kb
DJVU:
1842 kb
Other formats
azw mobi rtf docx
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
323


Three Came Home is a 1948 memoir written by Agnes Newton Keith, based on her experiences during the Japanese invasion of North Borneo. A film based on it was released in 1950 and featured Claudette Colbert in the lead role.

Three Came Home is a 1948 memoir written by Agnes Newton Keith, based on her experiences during the Japanese invasion of North Borneo. Initially, Olivia de Havilland was chosen for the role.

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This book was produced in EPUB format by the Internet Archive. By Agnes Newton Keith. The book pages were scanned and converted to EPUB format automatically. This process relies on optical character recognition, and is somewhat susceptible to errors. The book may not offer the correct reading sequence, and there may be weird characters, non-words, and incorrect guesses at structure.

That is what makes Agnes Keith's 1947 "Three Came Home" so rich Agnes Newton Keith came to British Borneo in 1934 as a new bride.

That is what makes Agnes Keith's 1947 "Three Came Home" so rich. Keith was a writer before her internment by the Japanese in 1942, and used her skill to present an heartbreaking but ultimately affirming narrative of life inside a jungle prison camp. Agnes Newton Keith came to British Borneo in 1934 as a new bride. Harry Keith was Director of Agriculture for the colony, charged with making trees grow "where before there were none. They settled in Sandakan, North Borneo, where Agnes translated her love of writing into an award-winning book, "Land Below the Winds.

The true story of Agnes Newton Keith's imprisonment in several Japanese . In THREE CAME HOME she plays Agnes Keith, an American author married to a British colonial officer (Patrick Knowles) living in Borneo.

The true story of Agnes Newton Keith's imprisonment in several Japanese prisoner-of-war camps from 1941 to the end of WWII. Separated from her husband and with a young son to care for she has many difficulties to face. Written by Col Needham

Agnes Keith was married to a British government officer when the Japanese took Indonesia during the early days . Three Came Home" is a superb book, for: in this book, Agnes Keith's writing describes a serious subject well, but with bits of whimsy.

Agnes Keith was married to a British government officer when the Japanese took Indonesia during the early days of World War II. Keith and her toddler son were taken to a POW camp; her husband spent the rest of the war in a men's camp under even worse conditions. Keith's memoir describes the starvation, the cruelty, the inhumane conditions, disease, torture, hard labor and the women's superhuman struggles to keep their children alive and relatively healthy. It's about the terrible conditions of internees of the Japanese in World War II. Three Came Home (book). Last updated November 24, 2019. Originally published.

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  • Realistic
This account of life in a Japanese prison camp in Borneo gives a fair evaluation of the author's experiences in relationship to the other prisoners, the camp guards, and the Japanese commandant. She tells of the cruelty and unexpected kindnesses that befell her during her four-year incarceration. The three who survived were her son and herself in the women's camp, and her agriculturalist husband in the men's camp, all of whom lost nearly fifty percent of their original body weight by the time they were liberated by British troops in 1945. Many similar stories were published after the war, but this one is noteworthy because of its balanced evaluation of the captors and their victims. This book has stood the test of time, and is as relevant today as it was seventy years ago.
  • Oghmaghma
Written in 1947 when the propriety of things, the cultures, and the language to explain them were different than today. It that sense it takes you back to that time. For that alone it was worth the trip. The Japanese are shown in a way that combines both the cruelty shown in the Death March and the less cruel treatment of women in internment camps, and makes it, not rational in occidental terms, but understandable, and certainly not acceptable. I think it was a really fine book. The movie was mediocre and did not bring the book to life.
  • Zololmaran
After seeing the 1950 Claudette Colbert film version of this book, I was interested in reading the memoir on which the film was based. Agnes Keith was married to a British government officer when the Japanese took Indonesia during the early days of World War II. Keith and her toddler son were taken to a POW camp; her husband spent the rest of the war in a men's camp under even worse conditions. Keith's memoir describes the starvation, the cruelty, the inhumane conditions, disease, torture, hard labor and the women's superhuman struggles to keep their children alive and relatively healthy. The story is not only about survival, but about the power of love. In the book an occasional racist remark, typical of the times, creeps in, but she also occasionally inserts insights into the humanity found even in some of her captors, and certainly in the Indonesian people. The book ends with little bitterness, and primarily a plea for peace. The film was remarkably faithful to the book, sanitizing and softening some details because film audiences weren't expected to see Claudette Colbert fighting rats, living in abject filth, or dropping down to 80 pounds. The film is still very powerful; the book even more so. This is a well-bound trade paperback edition.
  • lolike
"Three Came Home" is a superb book, for:
in this book, Agnes Keith's writing describes a serious subject well, but with bits of whimsy.
It's about the terrible conditions of internees of the Japanese in World War II.
Her drawings in it portray the topics so well that the few of them give as much to the book as all the text. If I had to recommend one or the other, alone, to someone, I don't know which it would be.
Of her autobiographical books, this one edges out her first one, "Land Below the Wind" (which should be read before this one to get you familiar with the individuals), only because of the awful plight of the people.
If I'm laying the praise on thick, it's because in all my years of reading, this one book has had the greatest effect on me.
James A. Coffeen
  • Ferri - My name
I ordered this excellent book having seen the movie version, first as a child approximately 60 years ago (in a theater) and then in the last year on Turner Classic Movies. It tells the story of one family's, and their friends' and associates', resistance to the terrors of captivity inflicted upon them by a conquering, invading army. Those terrors included starvation, beatings, and the arbitrary use of force that only could exist in a slave and master relationship. And yes, it is the story of human endurance under horrific circumstances.
  • Barinirm
It is a fantastic realistic book about being POW's in a Japanese prison camp. Agnes Keith for various reasons was able to save her life and the life of son.

She was actually able to meet her husband and three of them led a normal life after WWII.
  • SkroN
I read this book as a young woman. It was one of my dad's books and we hauled it (and boxes and boxes of others) all over the country from move to move. Then somewhere along the way it disappeared. I ordered this one, As I opened the box I let out a gasp! I was holding a piece of my past...brought tears to my eyes. I wondered if it was MY book? It's in really good condition. Excellent read. History, but not dry. The movie is great too. Claudette Colbert does a great job.
She writes about her experiences that my generation cannot imagine. Her prose is riveting and so human. It is a testament to what extreme circumstances do to the human spirit, both positive and negative, how humans survive and can sink into beastiality.