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Download Weapons and Warfare in Renaissance Europe: Gunpowder, Technology, and Tactics (Johns Hopkins Studies in the History of Technology) eBook

by Professor Bert S. Hall

Download Weapons and Warfare in Renaissance Europe: Gunpowder, Technology, and Tactics (Johns Hopkins Studies in the History of Technology) eBook
ISBN:
0801855314
Author:
Professor Bert S. Hall
Category:
Military
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Johns Hopkins University Press (May 12, 1997)
Pages:
320 pages
EPUB book:
1766 kb
FB2 book:
1364 kb
DJVU:
1264 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
553


Bert Hall delves deep into the technological history of Renaissance warfare and demonstrates both how much and . 00 words could be not enough to praise this book. Bert Hall produced a long needed work that will remain a foundation-stone in military technology of the black powder era.

Bert Hall delves deep into the technological history of Renaissance warfare and demonstrates both how much and how little new technologies have changed the face of battle. It deftly combines both a technical understanding of how those technologies were made with Mr. Hall's detailed understanding of the military history of that period. The work is primarily focussed on the effects of gunpowder and firearms, but begins in the pre-gunpowder era of the late middle ages. 2 people found this helpful.

Johns Hopkins Studies in the History of Technology). Small arms technology changed little from the introduction of corned gunpowder in the late 15th century to the spread of the bayonet in the late 17th century

Johns Hopkins Studies in the History of Technology). Small arms technology changed little from the introduction of corned gunpowder in the late 15th century to the spread of the bayonet in the late 17th century. Changes in warfare in this period were more a result of the fall and rise of fortifications, the establishment of tactics and finally in the expansion of armies due defensive strategies and the strength of the state. Through most of this period, the role of heavy cavalry - "knights in armour" - declined but was still important.

Gunpowder, Technology, and Tactics. Winner of the Wallace K. Ferguson Prize from the Canadian Historical Association. Weapons and Warfare in Renaissance Europe explores the history of gunpowder in Europe from the thirteenth century, when it was first imported from China, to the sixteenth century, as firearms became central to the conduct of war. Bridging the fields of military history and the history of technology-and challenging past assumptions about Europe's "gunpowder revolution"-Hall discovers a complex and fascinating story.

Home Hall, Professor Bert S. Weapons and Warfare in Renaissance Europe . Book Description Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997. Weapons and Warfare in Renaissance Europe: Gunpowder, Technology. Bert S. Hall focuses closely on the last innovation to examine the effects of changes in military technology on European history in the late Middle Ages and early modern era. Strategists, he writes, first used guns as a means of inducing panic in an enemy. 300 pages Ex-library book with typical markings (stamp, catalogue n. deactivated security label in the book). Otherwise only slight signs of use and shelf-wear, good condition.

Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997 - 320 sayfa.

Weapons and Warfare in Renaissance Europe explores the history of gunpowder in Europe from the thirteenth century, when it was first imported from China, to the sixteenth century, as firearms became central to the conduct of war.

the history of gunpowder in Europe from the thirteenth century, when it was .

Weapons and Warfare in Renaissance Europe: Gunpowder, Technology, and Tactics (Johns Hopkins Studies in the History of Technology). Hall details the efforts of armorers across Europe as they experimented with a variety of gunpowder recipes and gunsmithing techniques, and he examines the integration of new weapons into the existing structure of European warfare.

Weapons and Warfare in Renaissance Europe explores the history of gunpowder in Europe from the thirteenth century, when it was first imported from China, to the sixteenth century, as firearms became central to the conduct of war. Bridging the fields of military history and the history of technology -- and challenging past assumptions about Europe's "gunpowder revolution" -- Hall discovers a complex and fascinating story. Military inventors faced a host of challenges, he finds, from Europe's lack of naturally occurring saltpeter -- one of gunpowder's major components -- to the limitations of smooth-bore firearms. Manufacturing cheap, reliable gunpowder proved a difficult feat, as did making firearms that had reasonably predictable performance characteristics. Hall details the efforts of armorers across Europe as they experimented with a variety of gunpowder recipes and gunsmithing techniques, and he examines the integration of new weapons into the existing structure of European warfare.

  • Andromajurus
The first thing I would point out is that this is not a simple work. It's complex but also quite technical at times. Moreover it is focussed mostly on the gunpowder technology, weapons and tactics of western Europe. In this it achieves its goal.

If you are looking for a broad summary of 16th century warfare, tactics and mentality, this is only partially your work.

However, to explain the development of gunpowder, its effect and technical applications, this is very appropriate. The book is well written and I'd recommend it to anyone interested in the period with some background knowledge.
  • Bluddefender
Bert Hall delves deep into the technological history of Renaissance warfare and demonstrates both how much and how little new technologies have changed the face of battle. It deftly combines both a technical understanding of how those technologies were made with Mr. Hall's detailed understanding of the military history of that period.

The work is primarily focussed on the effects of gunpowder and firearms, but begins in the pre-gunpowder era of the late middle ages. By demonstrating how wars in this period were waged, the author shows the reader just how little the first gunpowder technology changed the way wars were fought. In essence, he shows how commanders faced with the new technology tried to fit it into traditional roles previously occupied by the longbow and crossbow and how it did not immediately eclipse those weapons in such roles.

From there, the author goes on to show how the peculiar advantages and disadvantages of the increasingly sophisticated gunpowder technology came to revolutionize strategic and tactical thought.

It is a rare work that considers topics ranging from the way in which the differing "recipes" that existed for gunpowder vastly altered the explosive potential of the substance to the tactical innovations and battles of Gonzalo Fernández de Córdoba. Mr. Hall handles both technological and historical matters with equal ease and effectively demonstrates how deeply the two are intertwined.

It is a tremendously engaging and enlightening work, and very well documented in its more than 800 endnotes. Perhaps surprisingly for an historical work, it was a real page-turner. When forced to set it down, I found myself counting the hours until I could get back to it. I will definitely be looking for additional books by this author.
  • Silverbrew
More than miltary buffs should read this book. Hall intertwines facets of technology and society to clarify how each can affect the other. Gunpowder did not sweep away the Middle Ages; the thought of the Middle Ages and Renaissance molded how and why gunpowder would be used. Hall makes the point that a new techology such as gunpowder does not dominate progress but is rather only an ingredient in a very complicated mix of elements.
  • Perongafa
Great for papers concerning this era.
  • Amis
1.000 words could be not enough to praise this book. Bert Hall produced a long needed work that will remain a foundation-stone in military technology of the black powder era.
  • Steel balls
It didn't take long for me to be pleasantly surprised at the high level of scholarship and clearly presented facts, the sort of writing all too often lacking from this area of history. As the author notes, many technology historians, military historians, and arms and armor writers propagate continuing myths and assumptions that can't be supported when the facts are examined closely. Here, Hall does the topic justice and it is clear he did his homework. The chapter discussing the technology of gunpowder was especially interesting, and supports his case for the reasons firearms developed as they did. I recommend a trip to the Metropolitan Museum in New York to have a look at their firearms, where many aspects of his discussion will further illuminate the items on display.