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Download World War II in Cartoons eBook

by Mark Bryant

Download World War II in Cartoons eBook
ISBN:
1904943063
Author:
Mark Bryant
Category:
Military
Language:
English
Publisher:
Grub Street Publishing (January 19, 2014)
Pages:
160 pages
EPUB book:
1364 kb
FB2 book:
1111 kb
DJVU:
1841 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
952


This book by Mark Bryant is a treat for people interested in history and cartoons told through the eyes of. .No collection of World War II cartoons would be complete without American Bill Mauldin, whose most famous drawings are included in this collection.

This book by Mark Bryant is a treat for people interested in history and cartoons told through the eyes of cartoonists of that time. Its a visual treat of cartoons collected from newspapers and magazines. What really got my attention was the sample materials from aerial leaflets,posters and never published cartoons drawn in prisoner-of-war camps.

Individuals expressed their own political views and preferences. During World War II, every major military power had propaganda offices that employed political cartoons to influence public opinion.

This book by Mark Bryant is a treat for people interested in history and cartoons told through the eyes of.

The cartoon has a special place in the history of World War I. Krokodil meanwhile produced its own brand of Soviet humour and satire, and cartoons were an important part of the Resistance movements in all occupied countries.

The cartoon has a special place in the history of World War II. During the London Blitz the British upper lip was kept resolutely stiff by the antics of Strube's little man growing marrows and the redfaced indignity of Low's Colonel Blimp. The Axis powers' view of the war has often been glossed over in pictorial histories, but considerable talent existed in Germany, Italy, Japan, and elsewhere between 1939 and 1945, drawing on the genius of such superb prewar publications as Simplicissimus.

Start by marking World War II in Cartoons as Want to Read .

Start by marking World War II in Cartoons as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book is divided into chapters covering the war year-by-year, each chapter prefaced with a concise introduction that provides a historical framework for the cartoons of that year.

The cartoon has a special place in the history of World War II, and the power of its message was felt by all sides of the conflict

The cartoon has a special place in the history of World War II, and the power of its message was felt by all sides of the conflict. Acclaimed cartoon historian Dr Mark Bryant has amassed a marvellous collection of images in colour and black and white, some famous, others not so - from, amongst others, British, French, American, Italian, German, Soviet and Japanese sources - which now appear in paperback form for the first time. Timed to co-incide with the 75th anniversary of the start of WWII.

World War II, some say, was scripted on March 5, 1933, when Adolf Hitler, then Chancellor of the fragile Weimar . Cartoons for the article are taken from Mark Bryant’s book World War 2 in Cartoons.

World War II, some say, was scripted on March 5, 1933, when Adolf Hitler, then Chancellor of the fragile Weimar Republic, overthrew President Hindenburg, then passing the ironically named ‘Enabling Act’, which effectively disabled all powers of the Parliament and the Constitution. The League of Nations was reduced to a joke with the withdrawal of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. The Edict would like to make a call for more such pieces from the social science departments at Ashoka. Aditya Khemka is in his final semester at Ashoka University.

Mark Bryant's magnificent book is a direct and truly authoritative history of WWII drawn at the time by cartoonists from all sides and from every possible angle

Mark Bryant's magnificent book is a direct and truly authoritative history of WWII drawn at the time by cartoonists from all sides and from every possible angle. Steve Bell 'World War II in Cartoons captures the passion and humour of what for many people today was the most dramatic and moving time of their lives. Mark Bryant has produced a wonderful and human record of what it was like. Rt Hon Lord Baker of Dorking CH 'This book succeeds at every level. It is a good browse, an informative read and a stimulating collection of source material.

Acclaimed cartoon historian Dr Mark Bryant has amassed a marvelous collection of images in color and black . The cartoon has a special place in the history of World War II, and the power of its message was felt by all sides of the conflict.

Acclaimed cartoon historian Dr Mark Bryant has amassed a marvelous collection of images in color and black and white, some famous, others not so – from, amongst others, British, French, American, Italian, German, Soviet and Japanese sources – which now appear in paperback form for the first time. Read full description.

Whether producing strips, social comment in magazines like Punch or Lilliput, savage caricature of allies and enemies, or a daily chronicle of events at home or abroad, little escaped the cartoonists pen during World War II and they encapsulated the great dramas in a way impossible in prose. This book is divided into chapters covering the war year-by-year, each chapter prefaced with a concise introduction that provides a historical framework for the cartoons of that year. Altogether some 300 cartoons, in color and black and white, have been skillfully blended to produce a unique record of World War II.
  • Syleazahad
This review covers both Mark Bryant books:

This is perhaps the best collection ever compiled from both wars. Cartoons from all sides -not just Britain or the U.S.- printed in full color and mint condition! WORLD WAR I IN CARTOONS features lots of cartoons from all warring nations (Italy, Russia, Turkey, Japan, etc.) that most likely haven't been seen in generations, along with the best examples from France's Poliu, Britain's Punch and Germany's Simplicissimus. There's also a great deal of recruiting posters and War Bonds ads to delight one's eye (what great artists, by the way!). Cartoons are arranged chronologically by topics, so you can see what was being printed at the time of Belgium's rape, Churchill's sacking, or Hindenburg's Great Offensive.

WORLD WAR II IN CARTOONS works the same way, and presents the best works from all the great names one can remember -and then some! Low, Mauldin, the Kukryniksi, Giles, Steinberg, Fougasse, Arno, Soglow, Tim, Szyk, Breger ...even Walt Disney! Not to mention lots of less known -but neverheless great- cartoonists from all over the world. Both books a must of musts; DON'T MISS 'EM!!!

P.S.: I included politicians in the title because they could very well benefit from the way politicians past were lampooned. Maybe it would help them think twice before screwing things up (-whom am I kidding?)!
  • Love Me
This book by Mark Bryant is a treat for people interested in history and cartoons told through the eyes of cartoonists of that time.Its a visual treat of cartoons collected from newspapers and magazines.What really got my attention was the sample materials from aerial leaflets,posters and never published cartoons drawn in prisoner-of-war camps.The book is printed on good quality glossy paper and also has historical background by the author related to the cartoons.Highly recommended.
  • Kekinos
I did it !
  • Arcanefist
They also enable you to plot the progress of the war. They are chosen from most of the combatant nations (apart from Japan) and are very interesting and engrossing, in the way that picture and map books often are. Also many of them are still very funny: the motorist asking for directions in a fuel-starved Britain suspicious of possible spies (or traitors -'fifth columnists') is obviously addressing this suspicion when he says 'If I were a spy or fifth columnist, you still would not want me to waste petrol, would you? Another one shows an irate householder, with a bomber thundering over his roof, just missing it, with a comment about how he thinks he will delay building the extension until after the war.

I found the cartoons produced by the Dutch, Danish and French underground interesting. There are artistic ones, such as 'Autumn' which shows swastikas tumbling like leaves from the trees and being swept up by a figure of death, as a skeleton.There is another harrowing one drawn by an inmate in a concentration camp which shows the air raid siren as thousands of people screaming. Awful.

On a lighter note, one of the most memorable shows two British troops (we drive on the left, unlike you and the Continental Europeans) in a jeep, driving like madmen down a road being shelled, bombed, strafed. The caption is:'You fool, do you realise you are driving on the wrong side of the road?' (as if you'd care!)

Wonderful value and great presentfor a relation who remembers the Second Great Unpleasantness. Get it!
  • Error parents
It is difficult today to imagine the issues of war, sacrifice, slaughter, and redemption being conveyed by simple, drawn lines. And yet there once was such a time, and we are fortunate that the art of the cartoon reached its zenith during the greatest conflict in our history. In his World War II in Cartoons, Mark Bryant has assembled a collection of more than 300 of the best cartoons from that era. Bryant has chosen cartoons published in the Allied and Axis countries, with the majority of the works coming from England. Bryant has selected well. He gives us a wide sampling of the various types of cartoons-some not humorous at all, some very light, all provocative-as well as the many styles of drawing. Throughout, he succinctly explains the context of each drawing. He is adept at pointing out small details which otherwise might be overlooked by the modern reader.

Although Bryant does not comment on the relative standing of the artists, it is clear that the most accomplished of the wartime illustrators was David Low (later Sir David Low). Bryant has selected more of Low's drawings than of any other cartoonist, and it is easy to see why. No one was better than Low in summing up the moral stakes of a given situation. His three drawings of the Nazi defendants at Nuremburg are masterpieces in the study of the banality of evil.

No collection of World War II cartoons would be complete without American Bill Mauldin, whose most famous drawings are included in this collection. Also included is the haunting image drawn by Clarence D. Batchelor of the New York Daily News in 1936, of Death dressed as a prostitute enticing a young man upstairs to her room. "Come on in," she says to the boy, "I'll treat you right. I used to know your daddy."

By assembling these cartoons-the best of which become art-Bryant has done much to remind us of how issues could be powerfully presented in a small, simple frame. I don't think he-or anyone-can now rescue this art form, but he has done us all a great service by showing what was done during the great blood letting of the last century. "World War II in Cartoons," by Mark Bryant. ISBN 1904943063 (Grub Street), 300 illus., b&w, color, hardcover oversized. 160 pages. Highly recommended.