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Download The Quest for Anastasia: Solving the Mystery of the Lost Romanovs eBook

by Helen Mingray,Helen Mingay,John Klier

Download The Quest for Anastasia: Solving the Mystery of the Lost Romanovs eBook
ISBN:
0806520647
Author:
Helen Mingray,Helen Mingay,John Klier
Category:
Russia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Citadel Pr (April 1, 1999)
Pages:
246 pages
EPUB book:
1174 kb
FB2 book:
1545 kb
DJVU:
1471 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
968


Helen Mingay, John Doyle Klier. com User, February 20, 1999. This is one of the best of the many books about the death of the last Czar and his family.

Helen Mingay, John Doyle Klier. It considers the various theories of what really happened, and provides valuable insights into the the individuals involved in this tragedy. A "must read" for anyone interested in this subject! 0. Report.

The Quest for Anastasia book. We got into the conspiracy theory that, as Helen Rappaport put it, "Letts and Jews" killed the Tsar and his family

The Quest for Anastasia book. Today, after eight decades, the fate of Anastasia and that of the entire Russian Imperial family is still shrouded in mystery, even after human remains discovered in a pit near Ekaterinburg in the Urals, were confirmed in 1993 as those of the Romanovs. We got into the conspiracy theory that, as Helen Rappaport put it, "Letts and Jews" killed the Tsar and his family. they discussed in detail with maps and diagrams how the murders took place and the lives of the Bolsheviks who killed them.

The fate of Anastasia and that of the Russian Imperial family is still a mystery, even after the announcement in. .

The fate of Anastasia and that of the Russian Imperial family is still a mystery, even after the announcement in 1993 of the discovery of their remains in a pit in Eastern Russia.

Authors : John Doyle Klier, Helen Mingay. Pages : 272. About Y-Not-Books. The fate of Anastasia and that of the Russian Imperial family is still a mystery, even after the announcement in 1993 of the discovery of their remains in a pit in Eastern Russia. Condition : Like New. Publication Date : 1995-06-29.

The Quest for Anastasia. Solving the Mystery of the Lost Romanovs. by John Klier, Helen Mingray, Helen Mingay. Published April 1999 by Citadel Press.

ISBN 10: 1559724420 ISBN 13: 9781559724425 Publisher: Birch Lane Pr, 1997 Hardcover. Customers who bought this item also bought. 1. The Quest for Anastasia: Solving the Mystery of the Lost Romanovs. Published by Brand: Citadel Pr (1999).

John Doyle Klier, Helen Mingay. The fate of Anastasia and that of the Russian Imperial family is still shrouded in mystery, even after the announcement in 1993 of the discovery of their remains in a pit near Ekaterinburg, Eastern Russia

John Doyle Klier, Helen Mingay. The fate of Anastasia and that of the Russian Imperial family is still shrouded in mystery, even after the announcement in 1993 of the discovery of their remains in a pit near Ekaterinburg, Eastern Russia. The many reports out of Russia concur that two of the royal children were missing from the grave, but they do not agree on their identity.

Manufacturer: Birch Lane Pr Release date: 1 September 1997 ISBN-10 : 1559724420 ISBN-13: 9781559724425. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Klier, John and Mingay, Helen, The Quest for Anastasia: Solving the Mystery of the Lost Romanovs (Smith Gryphon, 1995). Matthews, Owen, Stalin’s Children: Three Generations of Love and War (Bloomsbury, 2008). Pares, Bernard, The Fall of the Russian Monarchy (Phoenix Press, 2001). Alexander Solzhenitsyn: A Century in His Life (St Martin’s Press, 1998). Steinberg, Mark . Voices of Revolution, 1917 (Yale University Press, 2002). Zinovieff, Sofka, Red Princess: A Revolutionary Life (Granta Books, 2007). Helen Dunmore, The Siege (Penguin, 2002).

The Quest for Anastasia: Solving the Mystery of the Lost Romanovs. The NOOK Book (eBook) of the Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking by Michael Ruhlman at Barnes & Noble. Tiffany Ellerbee Springer. 100 Millions Lectures Ex Libris Lus Reading Lists New Books Science Books Reading Club Playlists.

Examines the evidence and circumstance surrounding the princess
  • Qutalan
The Quest for Anastasia is a summary of the life story of Franziska Schanskowska, once thought to be Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna, youngest daughter of Tsar Nicholas II. For more than sixty years this lady, usually known as Anna Anderson, was a center of controversy. Thanks to DNA testing, it is now known that she was not Anastasia, but the daughter of a Polish peasant. Although some of her followers still cannot accept this verdict, there is no reason to feel that Anna Anderson is lessened by the discovery of her true identity. She was a consummate actress who rose from humble surroundings to be the consort of royals and near-royals on two continents. The Quest for Anastasia makes an excellent companion for Robert K. Massie's The Romanovs: The Final Chapter and Nicholas and Alexandra.
  • Thetalune
Have just started reading but feel I will enjoy it and find it intriquing.
  • Rleyistr
Good book very interesting. Would recommend if your a romanov fan. The book puts very good details on who anna anderson really was. The one person she was not was grand duchess anastasia. Anastasia died with the rest of her family on that cellar in ekaterinburg.
  • Damand
This book is yet another version of the fascinating story of the last days of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. The book is strongest in its presentation of the endless squabbling among those with an interest in what happened to the Romanovs. That Nicholas and his family were taken to a basement room at Ipatiev House in Ekaterinberg, Siberia and shot seems to be well-documented. But exactly who did the shooting and why? The authors give us a cast of characters. The more interesting part -- and what is in dispute -- is this: Did everyone die in that basement? What happened after the shooting, when the soldiers hauled away the bodies? The authors try to retrace the events, but provide no story about any person in the basement group surviving, or how anyone could have survived.
And that brings us to the title of the book. Did Anastasia somehow survive the rain of bullets and thrusts of bayonets in that basement and reappear some years later in a mental hospital in Berlin? Was the woman known as Anna Anderson really Anastasia? As the authors point out -- but only after you've read to the end of the book -- DNA evidence says she was NOT Anastasia. If she was not Anastasia, how did she manage to convince many credible people, including people who knew Anastasia, that she was? The points of similarity were many, both physically and in her knowledge of the Russian court. Many of the people who believed she was the daughter of the tsar have not accepted the DNA evidence. Those who do accept it say she was really a Polish peasant who disappeared at the same time that "Anna" appeared.
Many people had vested interests in the story of Anna. Surviving members of the Romanov extended family supposedly wanted to make sure that Anna did not inherit any of the tsar's reported fortune (although no fortune was ever found), so it was because of their greed that they would not accept Anna as Anastasia. In some cases, investigators got sucked into the story (either looking for fame, fortune or simply charmed by Anna) and spent years of their lives trying to establish Anna's identity.
Those who persist in believing that Anna was Anastasia say a peasant girl could not have had such a "regal bearing" or knew as much about the Romanovs as Anna did. However, I see no reason why a Polish peasant girl who spent years in a hospital with nothing to do but read books and study couldn't have learned about the Russian court and couldn't have practiced acting like a Russian Grand Duchess. From the evidence, it appears that Anna came to believe she WAS the tsar's daughter. But if so, how did she claim to have escaped the bullets? Yes, she could have claimed amnesia about the event, but her identity as Anastasia is not believable without some accounting of her escape and the authors give us none. Perhaps because for them the DNA evidence was conclusive. Anna is NOT Anastasia.
The book is an entertaining read, and I enjoyed it, but it does not live up to its subtitle: "Solving the Mystery of the Lost Romanovs." As long as some people will not let go of their vision of Anastasia, who still believe that Anna was the tsar's daughter, then the story goes on. There are also at least two "pretenders" who have said they are Alexei -- both are dead now, but their families press their claim. Since two bodies were never found -- those of Alexei and of one of the daughters -- it seems likely that this is one story that will never go away, a mystery that can never truly be solved.
  • Faulkree
The title says it all. I'm sorry Mr. Klier, but this book is EXACTLY like "The Romanovs: The Final Chapter" by Robert K. Massie. It may just be coincidence since they were published in the same year, but honestly, there isn't anything new in this book that cannot be found in Massie's or in Peter Kurth's "Anastasia: The Riddle of Anna Anderson". And now there is a rehashed version of "The Quest For Anastasia" called "A Romanov Fantasy: Life At the Court Of Anna Anderson" by Frances Welch. When does it end? One book copies one, and then another copies that one. Soon our history books will be nothing but rumors!!
  • Usishele
I thought the book was excellent. I am 12 years old and have been very interested in the Romanovs since the age of 11. (I'm turning 13) I thought the book was so good I finished it in a day! I personally believe that Anastasia didn't survive, though I wish had, she didn't. The only thing I can say about Anna Anderson is that she must have been smart and lucky to be able to fool the people she did. With the information in the book I came to the conclusion that Miss Anderson wasn't her since she refused to do the tests and that there pretty much seemed to have given it away. The real Anastasia wouldn't have refused for giving DNA tests because she was the REAL Anastasia. So I think Anna Anderson was sly yet smart, but wasn't the real Anastasia. I suggest this book to any one who is interested in the Romanovs.
  • Vudomuro
This outstanding book focuses on the discovery and identification of the Romanov bones and the subsequent DNA testing. The book's strength lies in describing how the bones were found and not in the subjective non-scientific arguments as to whether Anna Anderson was Anastasia or Franziska Schanzkowska. This book is not clouded by the personal opinions of the authors. You won't find any self-serving statements or arguments in this book.
This is one of the best of the many books about the death of the last Czar and his family. It considers the various theories of what really happened, and provides valuable insights into the the individuals involved in this tragedy. A "must read" for anyone interested in this subject!