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Download Parish Boundaries: The Catholic Encounter with Race in the Twentieth-Century Urban North (Historical Studies of Urban America) eBook

by John T. McGreevy

Download Parish Boundaries: The Catholic Encounter with Race in the Twentieth-Century Urban North (Historical Studies of Urban America) eBook
ISBN:
0226558738
Author:
John T. McGreevy
Category:
World
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (May 15, 1996)
Pages:
368 pages
EPUB book:
1997 kb
FB2 book:
1149 kb
DJVU:
1433 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
785


Series: Historical Studies of Urban America. Paperback: 368 pages

Series: Historical Studies of Urban America. Paperback: 368 pages. A large portion of this book deals with the Catholic Church's complex relationship with the racial issue and "open housing" issues which were surfacing at the very same time that I was working for the SWOC. Cardinal Cody and large portions of the priesthood were attempting to deal with the racial issues in Chicago in s direct manner.

Parish Boundaries book . In vivid portraits of parish life, John McGreevy examines the contacts and conflicts between Euro-American Catholics and Parish Boundaries chronicles the history of Catholic parishes in major cities such as Boston, Chicago, Detroit, New York, and Philadelphia, melding their unique place in the urban landscape to the course of twentieth century American race relations.

Parish Boundaries chronicles the history of Catholic parishes in major cities such as Boston, Chicago, Detroit, New .

Parish Boundaries chronicles the history of Catholic parishes in major cities such as Boston, Chicago, Detroit, New York, and Philadelphia, melding their unique place in the urban landscape to the course of twentieth century American race relations. In vivid portraits of parish life, John McGreevy examines the contacts and conflicts between Euro-American Catholics and their African-American neighbors. By tracing the transformation of a church, its people, and the nation, McGreevy illuminates the enormous impact of religious culture on modern American society.

The urban Catholic world familiar to most working class people came under strong attack in the 1960s. McGreevy's book is written largely from an Irish American perspective

The urban Catholic world familiar to most working class people came under strong attack in the 1960s. Some of the attacks which were downright silly are not given close scrutiny by McGreevy. Included in these were assaults on the parochial schools as tools of the middle class and on the parish because of its connection to residential communities. McGreevy's book is written largely from an Irish American perspective. Poles and others are quoted, but mostly as bigoted pastors or racist working class rioters.

McGreevy, John T. Publication date. African Americans, Discrimination in housing, Race relations, Communities, Parishes, Northeastern States. Chicago : University of Chicago Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Francis Ong on November 29, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Parish Boundaries : The Catholic Encounter with Race in the Twentieth-Century Urban North. Parish Boundaries chronicles the history of Catholic parishes in major cities such as Boston, Chicago, Detroit, New York, and Philadelphia, melding their unique place in the urban landscape to the course of twentieth century American race relations.

Historical Studies of Urban America

Historical Studies of Urban America. Parish Boundaries can take its place in the front ranks of the literature of urban race relations.

Riots in the Cities: Popular Politics and the Urban Poor in Latin America, 1765–1910. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 1996.

Parish Boundaries chronicles the history of Catholic parishes in major cities such as Boston, Chicago, Detroit, New York, and Philadelphia, melding their unique place in the urban landscape to the course of twentieth century American race relations. In vivid portraits of parish life, John McGreevy examines the contacts and conflicts between Euro-American Catholics and their African-American neighbors. By tracing the transformation of a church, its people, and the nation, McGreevy illuminates the enormous impact of religious culture on modern American society."Parish Boundaries can take its place in the front ranks of the literature of urban race relations."—Jonathan Dorfman, Washington Post Book Review"A prodigiously researched, gracefully written book distinguished especially by its seamless treatment of social and intellectual history."—Robert Orsi, American Historical Review"Parish Boundaries will fascinate historians and anyone interested in the historic connection between parish and race."—Ed Marciniak, Chicago Tribune"The history that remains to be written will rest on the firm foundation of Mr. McGreevy's remarkable book."—Richard Wightman Fox, New York Times Book Review
  • Agamaginn
In 1968 and 1969, I lived and worked as a community organizer on the Southwest side of Chicago. The Southwest Community Organization, for which I worked, was a Saul Alinsky type of organization. During the time that I was working for the SWCO, the goal of the organization was to empower the community on the Southwest Side to work toward building a junior college in the community.

A large portion of this book deals with the Catholic Church's complex relationship with the racial issue and "open housing" issues which were surfacing at the very same time that I was working for the SWOC. Cardinal Cody and large portions of the priesthood were attempting to deal with the racial issues in Chicago in s direct manner. However, Father Francis X. Lawler was working to promote what he called "community stability" by starting 186 block clubs on the Southwest Side to prevent Afro-Americans from moving into the all-white Southwest Side. This was confronting the issue in the most negative way. Cardinal Cody had Father Lawler transferred out of Chicago and there were attempts to "discuss" the racial issues. This was an attempt to confront the racial issue in a positive manner, but it still had the effect of inflaming negative racial feelings. The story of Father Lawler and Cardinal Cody's reaction is contained in this book.

Rather than confront the racial problems in the community directly, SWOC felt that working for positive, concrete goals like the building of the junior college would do more to help the community (even with the racial issues) than anything the organization might do by openly attempting "discuss" the racial issues. I still believe that the effort we put into the building of what became Bogan Jr. College at 75th and Pulaski did more promote racial harmony over the long run than anything we could have done to directly confront the racial issues surfacing at the time.
  • Nicearad
This books is a fantastic look into the little known story of the struggle for Civil Rights within the Catholic Church and how the Church was involved in the Civil Rights era. I highly recommend this work to anyone that is interested in this period of American History.
  • CrazyDemon
This is an awesome volume by a first-rate researcher. If you have any interest in the role of Catholic parishes in the North - as ethnic enclaves and at times bastions of white supremacy - this is the book for you!
  • Timberahue
It's perfectly fine for John McGreevy to sit in his ivory tower and pass judgment on those he deems "racist."
What he needs is a reality check....he should take a ride through ANY big city and see how once vital working class neighborhoods have been turned to dangerous slums by his precious "integration."
He needs to be shown the ever-growing lists of all the Catholic churches and schools that have been closed and parishes either merged or phased out of existence...many over 100 years old... because the denizens of these "changed" neighborhoods either can't or won't support them.
Like most of the so-called "intelligenstia", McGreevy fails to see that what is marvelous in theory just does not work in reality.
  • SupperDom
This is one of the best books on Roman Catholics in Modern North America that I have encountered.
  • Cordabor
A very readable history of the Church's complex role in race relations in the 20th century. This is one of the best histories I've read.