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Download Ibn Gabirol (Jewish Thinkers) eBook

by Raphael Loewe

Download Ibn Gabirol (Jewish Thinkers) eBook
ISBN:
187001524X
Author:
Raphael Loewe
Category:
World
Language:
English
Publisher:
London : Halban; First Edition edition (1989)
Pages:
144 pages
EPUB book:
1502 kb
FB2 book:
1921 kb
DJVU:
1260 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
308


Ibn Gabirol (Jewish Thinkers).

Ibn Gabirol (Jewish Thinkers).

Raphael Lowe takes a Euro-centric approach to Ibn Gabirol. The book explains Ibn Gabirol from a distance like a scholar rather than a fan. Lowe also uses a distracting convention of translating the poems as if they were English Transcendentalist poems of the 19th century. I believe Lowe uses this to venerate the Medieval Jewish poetry but really it recontextualizes the poems and mutes some of the Eastern-ness of the words. Hebrew does not have the same kind of vocabulary as English and the words Raphael Lowe takes a Euro-centric approach to Ibn Gabirol

Items related to Ibn Gabirol (Jewish Thinkers). Raphael Loewe Ibn Gabirol (Jewish Thinkers)

Items related to Ibn Gabirol (Jewish Thinkers). Raphael Loewe Ibn Gabirol (Jewish Thinkers). ISBN 13: 9781870015240. Ibn Gabirol (Jewish Thinkers).

Solomon ibn Gabirol was an 11th-century Andalusian poet and Jewish philosopher with a Neo-Platonic bent. He published over a hundred poems, as well as works of biblical exegesis, philosophy, ethics:xxvii and satire.

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Find nearly any book by Raphael Loewe. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9780802132543 (978-0-8021-3254-3) Softcover, Grove Pr, 1991. Find signed collectible books: 'Ibn Gabirol'. Ibn Gabirol (Jewish Thinkers): ISBN 9781870015240 (978-1-870015-24-0) Softcover, London : Halban, 1989.

Jewish Neoplatonist Solomon ben Judah Ibn Gabirol (Shelomoh ben Yehudah Ibn Gabirol in Hebrew; Abu . eventually murdered) Jewish patron for a short while, it is also clear that Ibn Gabirol had an anti-social disposition and a mostly strained relationship with the Jewish community.

Jewish Neoplatonist Solomon ben Judah Ibn Gabirol (Shelomoh ben Yehudah Ibn Gabirol in Hebrew; Abu Ayyub Sulaiman ibn Yahya Ibn Jubayrol (or Ibn Jabirul) in Arabic; Avicebron, Avicembron, Avicenbrol, Avencebrol in Latin) was born in Málaga Spain in 1021/2 (Guttman offers 1026) and died, most likely in Valencia, most likely in 1057/8 (Guttman offers 1050; Sirat offers 1054–8; Joseph.

Solomon Gabirol plunges into poetry, writes S. Y. Agnon, medabek atzmo.

In it, he conjured up the poet Solomon ibn Garbirol, whose Keter Malkhut is read in many synagogues on Yom Kippur night. Solomon Gabirol plunges into poetry, writes S. Agnon, medabek atzmo be-charuz: glued to his craft, beading words with devotion.

Inevitably such an overview of Jewish thought must be highly selective, and many important figures have been omitted.

Inevitably such an overview of Jewish thought must be highly selective, and many important figures have been omitted

Raphael Loewe, who has died aged 92, was an extraordinary teacher and scholar whose great love was the poetry and .

Raphael Loewe, who has died aged 92, was an extraordinary teacher and scholar whose great love was the poetry and philosophy of the Jews of medieval Spain. He often said that he could feel the presence of one of the greatest of those poets, Solomon ibn Gabirol, hovering over his shoulder as he wrote. Raphael's linguistic skills were superb, and he regarded such linguistic facility as an absolute essential – without it, one could not understand the nuances, the alliterations and the associations of medieval poetry or prose.

Hard to Find book
  • Gogal
Solomon ibn Gabirol, also known as Avicebron, was a Spanish-Jewish poet and philosopher. Loewe considers him to be “the greatest of the Spanish-Jewish poets, even though popular enthusiasm for Judah Halevi has tended to overshadow him.” Loewe presents a large selection of ibn Gabirol’s poetry in the Hebrew original with an English translation so the ibn Gabirol’s “philosophy can be studied in depth.” He offers readers a history of Jews living in Muslim Spain, much of it being periods of persecution, persecutions not even close to one that the Jews suffered in Christian counties, for in Spain, for example, Jews were able to rise to high ministerial positions. Prior to the arrival of the Muslims, to site another example, Jews in Spain were cut off from their brethren outside Spain, but beginning in the eighth century Spanish Jews could communicate and did communicate with the Jewish religious leaders in Babylon (today’s Iraq).
Little is known about ibn Gabirol. Some sources say he was born around 1021 and died at age 30, others say 36, and still others later, even 1070. It is claimed that his “prenominal capacity to compose poetry in Hebrew manifested itself from a very early age, inviting comparison with the precocious musical talent of Mozart.” He had an “irascible temperament [which] dominated his intellect.” Although highly intelligent, he stressed the attribute of modesty. He wrote: “thou wilt not see a modest man lacking in intelligence.” He claims that he composed twenty books, but only seventeen remain. Scholars identify 538 poems, including 244 liturgical poems that they say he wrote. The most famous is his Azharot in which he lists what he considers to be the 613 biblical commandments.
Ibn Gabirol accepted the third-fourth century CE Neoplatonism as being a true description of how the world was formed. This philosophy contends that God is one, but there were “a multiplicity of derivative agencies that are styled ‘god.’” Gabirol describes the function of these spheres that were derived from God in his poetry and prose. It is a philosophy that is generally rejected today as being unscientific and, arguably, irrational and somewhat polytheistic. The twentieth century scholar Isaac Husik pronounced his book Meqor Hayyim, the Source of Life, to be “a peculiar combination of logical formalism with mystic obscurity, or profundity, according to one’s view.”
Gabirol’s poetry is kept alive by Jews who follow the Sephardic rite of prayer because they inserted many of his poems into their prayer service. They read his Azharot on Shavuot (Pentecost) because of a tradition that the Torah was revealed at that time.
Loewe includes with his selection of Gabirol poems selections from his Keter Malkhut, The Royal Crown, in Hebrew and English with some explanations of the long poem, a poem that expresses his Neoplatonic belief.
  • Opilar
Solomon ibn Gabriol was one of the great medieval thinkers and poets. In this short work Loewe outlines his work and thought.

His liturgical work is widely used by Sephadic Jews as part of their ritual serivice .His poem 'Keter Malkut ' links theology, cosmology and psychology."