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Download The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom: Rebellion and the Blasphemy of Empire (China Program Books (Hardcover)) eBook

by Thomas H. Reilly

Download The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom: Rebellion and the Blasphemy of Empire (China Program Books (Hardcover)) eBook
ISBN:
0295984309
Author:
Thomas H. Reilly
Category:
World
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Washington Press (September 1, 2004)
Pages:
232 pages
EPUB book:
1716 kb
FB2 book:
1797 kb
DJVU:
1458 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
763


Autumn in the Heavenly Kingdom: China, the West, and the Epic Story of the Taiping Civil Wa. is able to develop a strikingly original thesis.

Autumn in the Heavenly Kingdom: China, the West, and the Epic Story of the Taiping Civil War. Stephen R. Platt. God's Chinese Son: The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom of Hong Xiuquan is able to develop a strikingly original thesis. He argues that Protestant sources using Shangdi as the term for God in the translations of the Bible and especially the so-called Old Testament profoundly influenced Hong to connect his Christian faith to Chinese classical sources. ―Canadian Journal of History. All in all, the book presents an interesting thesis and is worth reading and using. ―Journal of Chinese Religions.

Электронная книга "The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom: Rebellion and the Blasphemy of Empire", Thomas H. Reilly. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom: Rebellion and the Blasphemy of Empire" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Thomas Reilly argues that the Taiping faith, although kindled by Protestant sources, developed into a. .

Thomas Reilly argues that the Taiping faith, although kindled by Protestant sources, developed into a dynamic new Chinese religion whose conception of its sovereign deity challenged the legitimacy of the Chinese empire. The Taiping rebels denounced the divine pretensions of the imperial title and the sacred character of the imperial office as blasphemous usurpations of Shangdi’s title and position.

A China Program Book. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2004. The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom: Rebellion and the Blasphemy of Empire. Scott W. Sunquist (a1). A China Program Book.

Mobile version (beta). Download (pdf, . 9 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom book. The Taiping were mentioned The Taiping heavenly kingdom and the violence it generated caused the death of 17 to 25 million people, that is more then the first world war yet most people would look at you funny if you asked them about it. Curiously this tendency to overlook this war goes beyond the superficial, in my studies whenever Chinese history of the 19th century came up, more attention was given to the opium wars and the boxers rebellion as evidence of political upheaval late quinq China.

Thomas Reilly argues that the Taiping faith, although kindled by a foreign source, developed into a dynamic new Chinese religion whose conception of the title and position of its sovereign deity challenged the legitimacy of the Chinese empire. The Taiping rebels denounced the divine pretensions of the imperial title and the sacred character of the imperial office as blasphemous usurpations of Shangdi's title and position. In place of the imperial institution, the rebels called for restoration of the classical system of kingship.

The Taiping Rebellion, which is also known as the Taiping Civil War or the Taiping Revolution, was a massive rebellion or civil war that was waged in China from 1850 to 1864 between the established Manchu-led Qing dynasty and the Hakka-led Taiping H.

The Taiping Rebellion, which is also known as the Taiping Civil War or the Taiping Revolution, was a massive rebellion or civil war that was waged in China from 1850 to 1864 between the established Manchu-led Qing dynasty and the Hakka-led Taiping Heavenly Kingdom

This book makes a major contribution to the study of the Taiping Rebellion and to our understanding of the ideology of both the rebels and the traditional imperial system they opposed

This book makes a major contribution to the study of the Taiping Rebellion and to our understanding of the ideology of both the rebels and the traditional imperial system they opposed. It will appeal to scholars in the fields of Chinese history, religion, and culture and of Christian theology and church history. Geographic Name: China History Taiping Rebellion, 1850-1864 Religious aspects. Rubrics: Christianity China Influence.

Occupying much of imperial China’s Yangzi River heartland and costing more than twenty million lives, the Taiping Rebellion (1851-64) was no ordinary peasant revolt. What most distinguished this dramatic upheaval from earlier rebellions were the spiritual beliefs of the rebels. The core of the Taiping faith focused on the belief that Shangdi, the high God of classical China, had chosen the Taiping leader, Hong Xiuquan, to establish his Heavenly Kingdom on Earth.How were the Taiping rebels, professing this new creed, able to mount their rebellion and recruit multitudes of followers in their sweep through the empire? Thomas Reilly argues that the Taiping faith, although kindled by Protestant sources, developed into a dynamic new Chinese religion whose conception of its sovereign deity challenged the legitimacy of the Chinese empire. The Taiping rebels denounced the divine pretensions of the imperial title and the sacred character of the imperial office as blasphemous usurpations of Shangdi’s title and position. In place of the imperial institution, the rebels called for restoration of the classical system of kingship. Previous rebellions had declared their contemporary dynasties corrupt and therefore in need of revival; the Taiping, by contrast, branded the entire imperial order blasphemous and in need of replacement.In this study, Reilly emphasizes the Christian elements of the Taiping faith, showing how Protestant missionaries built on earlier Catholic efforts to translate Christianity into a Chinese idiom. Prior studies of the rebellion have failed to appreciate how Hong Xiuquan’s interpretation of Christianity connected the Taiping faith to an imperial Chinese cultural and religious context. The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom shows how the Bible--in particular, a Chinese translation of the Old Testament--profoundly influenced Hong and his followers, leading them to understand the first three of the Ten Commandments as an indictment of the imperial order. The rebels thus sought to destroy imperial culture along with its institutions and Confucian underpinnings, all of which they regarded as blasphemous. Strongly iconoclastic, the Taiping followers smashed religious statues and imperially approved icons throughout the lands they conquered. By such actions the Taiping Rebellion transformed--at least for its followers but to some extent for all Chinese--how Chinese people thought about religion, the imperial title and office, and the entire traditional imperial and Confucian order.This book makes a major contribution to the study of the Taiping Rebellion and to our understanding of the ideology of both the rebels and the traditional imperial order they opposed. It will appeal to scholars in the fields of Chinese history, religion, and culture and of Christian theology and church history.