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Download With God on Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America (Pbs Series) eBook

by William Martin

Download With God on Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America (Pbs Series) eBook
ISBN:
0553067494
Author:
William Martin
Category:
World
Language:
English
Publisher:
Broadway; Reprint edition (July 1, 1997)
Pages:
436 pages
EPUB book:
1634 kb
FB2 book:
1850 kb
DJVU:
1234 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
294


It stands separately, but as a good companion to the PBS series of the same name. No matter which side of the fence you fall on, this book is a must for students of both religion and politics. 5 people found this helpful.

To others, the Religious Right is valiantly struggling to preserve religious liberty and to prove itself as the last . Excellent history and analysis of the rise of the Christian right.

To others, the Religious Right is valiantly struggling to preserve religious liberty and to prove itself as the last, best hope to save America's The rise of the Religious Right is one of the most important political and cultural stories of our time. To many, this controversial movement threatens to upset the nation's delicate balance of religious and secular interests.

in America (Pbs Series) By : William Martin. From the no. 1 bestselling author of The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, the book that re. .

With God on Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America (Pbs Series) By : William Martin  .

The rise of the Religious Right is one of the most important political and cultural stories of our time. It stands separately, but as a good companion to the PBS series of the same name. With God on Our Side has extensive tracts of information (mostly from interviews) on Billy Graham, Ralph Reed, Pat Robertson and the Christian Coalition, as well as Jerry Falwell and the Moral Majority.

Unsurprisingly, it took little time for both politicians and religious leaders to see the mutual benefits of (well-choreographed and tightly scripted) alliances.

Relying heavily on archival footage and stand-alone interviews, With God on Our Side primarily chronicles the history and growing political ascendancy of the religious right in North America over the last half century. From Billy Graham’s early crusades against Communism to the seismic shift in national politics brought about by Jerry Falwell and his Moral Majority in the '80s, this film is a well-studied and unbiased report on the powerful union of politics and conservative religion. Unsurprisingly, it took little time for both politicians and religious leaders to see the mutual benefits of (well-choreographed and tightly scripted) alliances.

With God On Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America by William Martin. PBS: FRONTLINE: The Jesus Factor An examination of religion, the political career and presidency of George W. Bush, and the influence of evangelical Christians. God's Name in Vain: The Wrongs and Rights of Religion in Politics by Stephen L. Carter. Souled Out: Reclaiming Faith and Politics After the Religious Right by .

I must tell you that I am not objective Van Taylor, David.

With God on Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America" is a six-hour documentary series premiering on PBS on September 27, 1996 (check local listings for time and dates). It is one of the most stunning, bound-to-be controversial things ever done by them, and it could not be more timely. I must tell you that I am not objective. I find the Religious Right a hybrid of politics and faith that brings out my Voltairean instincts. Questia is operated by Cengage Learning.

The Best Documentaries on US Voting Fraud & Rigged Elections. a list of 21 titles created 26 Oct 2016. FILM LIFE: The American Presidents and the History of the United States Chapter 16. History - US1 - Religion. a list of 33 titles created 16 Oct 2016. a list of 3234 titles created 12 Dec 2017.

Thoughtful and thought-provoking, "With God on Our Side" examines the way America's religious right turned itself . PBS. Production: Executive producer, Calvin Skaggs; series producer, David Van Taylor. Narrator: Cliff Robertson.

Thoughtful and thought-provoking, "With God on Our Side" examines the way America's religious right turned itself from a nation of sheep into a powerful political flock that exacts its influence as it demands to be heard. Ultimately, "God's" strength lies not in how it judges its subject, but in how it lets its subject present and, thereby, judge itself.

The rise of the Religious Right is one of the most important political and cultural stories of our time.  To many, this controversial movement threatens to upset the nation's delicate balance of religious and secular interests.  To others, the Religious Right is valiantly struggling to preserve religious liberty and to prove itself as the last, best hope to save America's soul.  In With God on Our Side --the first balanced account of conservative Christians' impact on post-war politics--William Martin paints a vivid and authoritative portrait of America's most powerful political interest group.Although its members now number between forty and sixty million people, the Religious Right has not always carried the tremendous--and growing--political clout it enjoys today.  A hundred years ago, scattered groups of conservative Christians worked fervently to spread the Gospel, but their involvement in politics was marginal.  Early in this century, however, a series of charismatic and ambitious leaders began transforming the movement; by the election of John F. Kennedy as our first Catholic president, the Religious Right had found its voice.  Politics and religion began mixing as never before.  From Richard Nixon's strategic manipulation of Graham's religious influence in the 1970s, to Ronald Reagan's association with Falwell's Moral Majority in the 1980s, to the Christian Coalition's emergence as a slick, sophisticated political machine, the line separating the pulpit from the presidency became increasingly blurred. Now, preachers such as Graham, Falwell, and Pat Robertson preside over ministries so vast and well organized that most politicians can ill afford to ignore their views--or lose their votes.In recent years, the Religious Right's political influence has propelled it into spheres beyond pure politics.  Race relations, abortion and reproductive rights, school curricula, the nature and role of the family--conservative Christians have embraced all of these socially charged issues, and their activism has irrevocably altered the way America confronts its thorniest problems.  How does a free society draw the line between Church and State without removing religious conviction from public life? What motivates individual Americans to do battle in the culture wars? Most importantly, when politicians and religiously motivated activists join forces, who holds the reins?Drawing on over 100 new interviews with key figures in the movement, William Martin brilliantly captures the spirit of the age as he explores both sides ofthis dramatic debate.  Written in conjunction with the producers of the public television series of the same name, this landmark book is essential reading for all Americans--conservative and liberal, fundamentalist and atheist--who care about the spiritual health and political future of our country.
  • ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
Martin's book is a fairly comprehensive review of the politics of the right - religious and political - in the twentieth century. It stands separately, but as a good companion to the PBS series of the same name. With God on Our Side has extensive tracts of information (mostly from interviews) on Billy Graham, Ralph Reed, Pat Robertson and the Christian Coalition, as well as Jerry Falwell and the Moral Majority. It seems fairly objective in its presentation. I highly recommend it for those wishing a deep and fairly well-balanced account of the Christian Right (it is better as a review or prep book for a professor or graduate than for an undergraduate text). The book's detail declines after the first Bush Administration. It has less information on the Clinton era, and almost none on the Presidency of Bush Jr. Overall a good work, rooted in what seems to be a solid review.
  • Skrimpak
Very thorough research. Tells the story in conversation after conversation, from people who were there. I was amazed, and somewhat horrified by what was revealed, for it is not only a story of belief, but a story of misuse of power to enforce those beliefs on others.
  • Dodo
This book was on a suggested reading list for one of my classes. I didn't finish reading it, but from what I read, it was a wonderful book.
  • Weiehan
really interesting for a european who does not know much about the USA
  • ZloyGenii
This book is pretty solid in documenting the history of the religious right in America. Although much of the focus is on the last half of the 20th century, the introduction and the epilogue give some background on the interaction between Christianity and government in the previous period.
I haven't seen the PBS television series that this book accompanies, so some things in the book probably impact a little differently than seeing video or audio accounts, especially so in a movement that makes so much use of oral speeches and broadcasts. But at least in the written account, the balance is kept between fair treatment and criticism of the different elements of the movement. This is no easy feat, given the sometimes inflammatory rhetoric both by the Christian right and against it.
The chapters of the book appear to reflect an episode format, with varying types of focal points telling the story in a roughly chronological order. One chapter profiles a person (--Billy Graham) while other chapters highlight in depth a local conflict (such as the battle over sex education in Anaheim and the school book battle in West Virginia), while others talk primarily about the formation of the major activist groups (Moral Majority, and then later the Christian Coalition). One trend appears to be that as the Judeo-Christian culture lost its monopoly in the political process, the struggle has been for the Christian right (in whatever form it took at the time) to keep its place at the table while keeping to its core values. Even at the end of the book (which ends with mid-1996), this conflict was not resolved.
The book also focuses on personal profiles of the individuals in the involvement, which also provides some more depth about what many people might lump together as monolithic. The differences between Jerry Falwell's background (the rural son of an alcoholic father) and Pat Robertson (the son of a U.S. senator) are pointed out in light of the interaction (or lack thereof) at certain points when they would be considered natural allies on the surface. And at a time in the 1980s when most Christian preachers and conservative commentators were considering the possibility of quarantining or tatooing AIDS patients, one televangelist said:
"How sad that we as Christians, who ought to be the salt of the earth, and we, who are supposed to be able to love everyone, are afraid so of an AIDS patient that we will not go up and put our arm around them and tell them that we care."
The televangelist? Tammy Faye Bakker.
For those seeking to learn about the movement without the whitewash or the ridicule that accompanies most assessments of the Christian right, this book is the best place to start.
  • Minha
This book is written as a companion the the PBS series of the same name, but it stands alone quite
well. The book is a detailed history of the influence of evangleical Christians in American
government, concentrating on the past twenty or so years. The book gives a detailed account of the
rise of the Moral Majority and the Christian Coalition.

The book is not very opiniated; it is mostly historical. It gives a fair view of many of the people who have shaped religion and politics in the past twenty years. The evangelicals are not treated as either heros of religious freedom or ruthless tyrants bent on theocracy, but as the ordinary people that they (most of them) are.

The book describes Billy Graham's initial foray into politics, commanding the ear of presidents
Johnson and Nixon. Battles over controversial textbooks in West Virginia are shown to be the first battles won by the Religious Right. Jimmy Carter is presented as a hopeful evangelical hero, and later a disappointment. Jerry Fal
  • Jerinovir
Martin is scrupulously objective in a responsible scholarly way: he is writing history, not passing personal judgment on what these people have to say for themselves. He is to be commended for this difficult integrity, as is the team of interviewers who did thousands of hours of interviews (an invaluable record available as a film documentary). Because their objectivity was beyond question, people spoke to them quite openly. And the plain scholarly facts of the matter are flat-out terrifying. Some remarkably naive viewers or readers have complained that either the book or the film are sympathetic simply because they are not outraged-and-condemning. They are not paying close enough attention: all the necessary facts are there, and we are presumed to have enough intelligence to draw the necessary conclusions ourselves. This is remarkably important, graceful, intelligent work.
William Martin's With God on Our Side offers a sympathetic yet objective look at the evolution of Christian fundamentalism in America over the last 50 years, culminating in the rise of the Christian Coalition and the Religious Right. Written in conjunction with a PBS series of the same title, Martin's book contains both a detailed overview and plenty of first-hand accounts of events that have transformed what was once a politically non-existent group into one of the most important voting blocs in America. No matter which side of the fence you fall on, this book is a must for students of both religion and politics.