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Download Judaism in the Modern World (The B.G. Rudolph Lectures in Judaic Studies) eBook

by Alan L. Berger

Download Judaism in the Modern World (The B.G. Rudolph Lectures in Judaic Studies) eBook
ISBN:
0814712231
Author:
Alan L. Berger
Category:
World
Language:
English
Publisher:
NYU Press (October 1, 1994)
Pages:
1 pages
EPUB book:
1760 kb
FB2 book:
1194 kb
DJVU:
1781 kb
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4.1
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927


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Judaism in the Modern Wo. Rudolph Lectures in Judaic Studies. Hardcover: 308 pages. Publisher: NYU Press (October 1, 1994).

While modern society is permitting Judaism a place, profound questions over Jewish identity are taking shape.

While modern society is permitting Judaism a place, profound questions over Jewish As anti-semitism finds new .

While modern society is permitting Judaism a place, profound questions over Jewish As anti-semitism finds new followers and Israel makes peace with old enemies, Jews in the modern world face constantly metamorphosizing relationships. From the eighteenth century to the present, unprecedented opportunities have grown up alongside new challenges for the Jewish people. While modern society is permitting Judaism a place, profound questions over Jewish identity are taking shape.

The Syracuse University Press launches the third series of . Rudolph lectures in Judaic studies new series.

Rudolph Lectures in Judaic Studies): Judaism in the Modern World (. Rudolph Lectures in Judaic Studies): ISBN 9780814712122 (978-0-8147-1212-2) Hardcover, NYU Press, 1994. Judaism in the Modern World (The . Rudolph Lectures in Judaic Studies): ISBN 9780814712238 (978-0-8147-1223-8) Softcover, NYU Press, 1994. Methodology in the Academic Teaching of the Holocaust. Coauthors & Alternates.

American Judaism itself. The Study ofAmerican Judaism: A Look Ahead 421 Notes I. 2. 3·4·5·6. 7·8. Lou H. Silberman, Amencan Impact: judaism in the United States in the Early Nineteenth Century. The B. G. Rudolph Lectures in Judaic Studies (Syracuse: 1964), reprinted in A. Leland Jamison, Tradition and Change in Jewish Experience (Syracuse: Syracuse University, 197~), 106-140. David D. Hall, LivedReligion inAmenca: TowardA History ofPractice (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997), vii.

Rudolph lectures in Judaic studies 504 Includes bibliographical references and index. 591 Record updated by Marcive processing 20 January 2012. 650 0 Jews xHistory y1789-1945. 650 0 Jews xHistory y1945-650 0 Judaism xHistory yModern period, 1750-650 0 Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) xInfluence. 650 0 Literature, Modern xJewish authors xHistory and criticism. 650 0 Judaism and literature.

The essays gathered in Judaism in the Modern World address the issue of Jewish persistence amidst changing forms of identity. Exploring a wide range of sources, the essayists examine historical issues, the Holocaust and its repercussions, literature, and theological dimensions while seeking the nature of Judaism in modern times. As they reassess Judaism's past while pursuing a meaningful Jewish future, these essays raise crucial questions about the tradition's central mythic structures, such as covenant and redemption

Judaism in world perspective. Relation with non-Judaic religions .

Judaism in world perspective. Exclusivist and universalist emphases. Judaism is characterized by a belief in one transcendent God who revealed himself to Abraham, Moses, and the Hebrew prophets and by a religious life in accordance with Scriptures and rabbinic traditions. In any event, the history of Judaism can be divided into the following major periods: biblical Judaism (c. 20th–4th century bce), Hellenistic Judaism (4th century bce–2nd century ce), Rabbinic Judaism (2nd–18th century ce), and modern Judaism (c. 1750 to the present). Salo Wittmayer Baron.

Three published volumes cover the history of Judaism from the Persian period up to the third century, and a fourth is in.As Western Christendom began its remarkable surge forward in the eleventh century, this progress had an impact on the Jewish minority as well.

Three published volumes cover the history of Judaism from the Persian period up to the third century, and a fourth is in preparation on the late Roman-Rabbinic period. The older Jewries of southern Europe grew and became more productive in every sense.

As anti-semitism finds new followers and Israel makes peace with old enemies, Jews in the modern world face constantly metamorphosizing relationships. From the eighteenth century to the present, unprecedented opportunities have grown up alongside new challenges for the Jewish people. While modern society is permitting Judaism a place, profound questions over Jewish identity are taking shape.

The essays gathered in Judaism in the Modern World address the issue of Jewish persistence amidst changing forms of identity. Exploring a wide range of sources, the essayists examine historical issues, the Holocaust and its repercussions, literature, and theological dimensions while seeking the nature of Judaism in modern times. As they reassess Judaism's past while pursuing a meaningful Jewish future, these essays raise crucial questions about the tradition's central mythic structures, such as covenant and redemption.

The contributors to this volume broach everything from feminism to the creation of the state of Israel. Sander Gilman illustrates how Jewish identity is inextricably linked to the physical, showing how racial identity both reflects and defines Jewishness. Raul Hilberg examines Holocaust remembrance, in the wake of Holocaust denial, as an act of revolt. A wide-ranging and thoughtful collection, Judaism in the Modern World will appeal to readers concerned with the fate of Judaism in the modern era.